Skip to main content

Full text of "The Pennsylvania magazine of history and biography"

See other formats


rvKX* XHI W' ViVr I ' I JV> F; j > 




IB HBH 



M 




p ■ 

I 



■ 

■ 1 






■I 



w^ALviivtl 



I i 



REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



? 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY ! 



3 1833 01749 3245 



! 



GENEALOGY 
974.8 
P3859 
1900-1901 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/pennsylvaniamaga24hist 



O?; 



~- — j 






«/ 



fw* HTlg HI J3 at I i i« 






I 1 



6' 



1 >/ rvB ft r All ^ fe tS 



OR 



VOL AAi. v c 



PHILADKI I'll I A: 
PUBLICATION r UN I) OF* 

THK HISTORICAL SOCIKTY O* PENNSYLVANIA; 

No. 1300 IXXTST STREET. 
i9cx>. 



X 707*0? 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME XX IV. 



1 



PAGE 

I'rfHt-iHlInpi of the Jlisiorieal Society of Pennsylvania on the 

Death of Charles Janeway Stille, LL.D., President of the 

Sxicty. {Portrait.) . . . . . . . i-xxviii 

"The AnVftean Society held at Philadelphia for Promoting Useful 

Knowledge.?* By Mrs. W. Lane Vcrlendcn .... 1 

"Old Mollies Cumberland." By George 0. Seithamer . .17 
Friends' Burial-Grouud, Burlington, New Jersey. By Rowland J: 

. DatUm: {IHuit rated.) . . . . . .48, 149 

Pennsylvania and the English Government, 1699--1704. By JI>r- 

nian V. Ames . . . . . ... . . .01 

\yniuuo Ilai-e. By Miles While, Jr SI 

A Ulster of Marrisre? and Deaths, 1802 . . . . 101, 207 
Ship Kciristers for the Fort, of Phpadclphia, 1720-1775. (Cbn- 

tinued.) . . 108,212,348,500 

Notes aiub Queries ... . . . . 116,230,367,520 

The Mother of Lincoln. By Howard M. Jenkins . . . 129 
Utters of the. Rev. Griffith Hughes of Si. David's Church, Radnor, 

Pennsylvania, 17;>3-17SG. By Benjamin F. Owen . .139 
The Penns and the Taxation of their Estates by ibe Provincial 

Assembly. [Continued.) 165, 308, 479 

An Old Pennsylvania Royal Coat-of-Arms. By Thomas Atlen 

Gtenn . . . . .- . . . .178 

The Names of the Early Settlers of Darby Township, Chester 

County, IVnnaylvaiuav- By Morgan Bunting. [Map.) . 1S2 

\A*\ t-.i foreigners who arrived at Philadelphia. 17111-1792. By 

Lather R. Kelker 187,334 

The two Kival Autobiographies of Franklin. By Richard Meade 

Ra:U* . . . . . . . . . .195 

An Itinerary to Niagara Falls in 1809 200 

Some of the Descendants of Evan Robert Lewia of Pton Goch, 

Waled . 203 

ktecord of the Descendants of James and Phcbe Gillingham . . 224 
Bojfc Notices ........ 252, 395, 527 

Lift or Margaret Ship pen, wife of Benedict Arnold. By Lc rti 

Kurd Walker. [IWrait.) [Continued.) . . . 257, 401 
lithographic Portraits of Albert Newsaui, By J). McX S -"■.'" 

V\>rtruit.) 267, 430 

(hi) 



iv Contents of Volume A 

A Letter of the Mother of Washington. [Fat 
Colonel "Ellas Boudinot's Xotea of two Co?;! 

American and British Commissioners 
Cartel for the Exchange of Prisoners of 
The First German Newspaper Published in Ai 
A Synopsis of Pennsylvania History. By Ch. 

DuCoudray's " Observations on the Forts ir.tv 

of the two Passages of the River Delawax 
Colonel Elias Boudinot in New York City, ] 

Helen Jordan ..... 
Letters of Rev. Richard Locke ami Rev. Georj. 

in Pennsylvania of the "Society for Prop 

Foreign Parts," London, 1747-1752. 1. 
Letter of Instructions of James Logan to J.i:. 

tary Affairs, 1727 .... 
Minutes of the Historical Society of Pennsyh 
Officers of the Historical Society of Pennsylvs 
Extracts from the Report of the Treasurer to L . 

ber 31, PJOO . . . ... 

Annual Statement of the Trustees of the 0" 

Historical Society of Pennsylvania, 1 DOC- 
Index 



IN MEMORY 

OF 

CHARLES JANEWAY STILLE, LLD. 



N 



^ 



is*) 



.v.^«i--,»-..^a-mI mu j»X . *A^x~^tmr* . - - .- .•>■_. ^ -J^ ... n . rfc . . 






PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF PENNSYLVANIA 



ON THE DEATH OF 



CHARLES JANEWAY ST1LLE, LL.D 



PRESIDENT OF TH:: SOCIETY 



HELD MAY 21, 1900 



PHILADELPHIA 

PRINTED BY J. B. L1PPINCOTT COMPANY 

1900 



PROCEEDINGS AND ADDRESS. 



A Special Meetes'g of the Society was held in the As- 
sembly Room on Monday evening, May 21, 1000, the Presi- 
dent, the Hon. Samuel Whitaker Ponnypaeker, LL.T)., in 
trie chair, and Hampton L. Carson, Ksq., Recording Secre- 
tary, A large and sympathetic audience was in attendance. 
•The President, on opening .the meeting, said : 

Ladies and Gentlemen*: 

Since the organization of this Society in the early part of 
the present century down to the time of Dr. Charles J. 
Stille, and including that time, it has been unusually f 
nate in the character of the men who have been called 
upon to preside oyer its deliberations. William Rawle, 
Peter S. Du Ponceau, Thomas Sergeant, George \Y. N orris, 
Joseph R. Ingersoll, John William Wallace, Brinton Coxe, 
and Charles J. Stille, were all of them not only of high 
position in the community, but of great intellectual vigor. 
Of them all, however, Dr. Stille has done the most to ex- 
plore and elucidate the history oC Pennsylvania, and in this 
respect to advance the purposes of the Society. 

It gives me pleasure to present to you Professor Robert 
Ellis Thompson, President of the Central High School, who 
will depict to you the life and career of this learned his 
torian and eminent scholar. 

Professor Thompson then said : 

Mr.. Piiesident, Ladies ani> Genu, km ex: 

It has been the glory of our city in every period of its 
historv to have been the mother of men. Vrom the time 



vi In Monocy nf Ckarka Janacay St'dli\ LL.D. 

of Story and Benezet to the present there has been an un- 
broken succession of citizens, whose nature ndorn the m 
and add to the lustre of her good name — men of i 
abilities, line achievement, distinct personal flavor, 
above all of that sterling social quality our fathers ( 
"public spirit." Such a man was the late President of I 
Society, in whose honor wc are assembled this evei 
and of whom I am to speak to you at the request of 
managers. 

CD 

Charles Janeway Stille was born in this city on the 23d 
of September, 1810. He was descended on his far 
side from Olof Stille, a member of the third Swedish 
colony which reached the shores of the Delaware in 1641. 
Jle came from the parish of Lanna in Roslagen, and settled 
at a place known to the Indians as Techoherassi, and to the 
..Swedes as " Olof Stille's land," on the Delaware, just i 
Upland, now Chester, Pennsylvania, ami afterwards re- 
moved to Passyunk, near the old site oi % the United S 
Xavy Yard. Olof Stille was a person of note, occnp; 
high otlices in the Swedish colony, and his descendants 
became prominent merchants ot y Philadelphia, at a time 
when commerce was the leading business inter* 
when the city clung to the Delaware front. This traditional 
employment continued in the family down to Johi S 
the father of our deceased friend, who lived in (be 0] I 
decades of the present century. 

While Dr. Stille's descent on the father'.- side thus 
minds us of the era which preceded Penn's ncqui 
the colony, and the settlement o\ Philadelphia ptOj 
on his mother's side carries us bavk t>» imcestow -til! 
widely known. His mother, Maria Wagner, uraa 
descendant of the Rev. Tobias Wagner, nn eminent 1- - 



Proceedings and Address, 



VI 1 



theran clergyman of Heading, who represented in America 
the. Wagner family of >Vnrtemberg, eminent in both the 
clerical and the legal annals of that kingdom The beet 
known member of it was Tobias Wagner, Chancellor of 
the University of Tubingen in the seventeenth • century, 
and a learned champion of Lutheran orthodox}', as weH 
a prolific author. 

The marriage of John Stillc and Maria Wagner tras un- 
usually felicitous. She was a lady of rare domestic virtu* 
and active in all good works; and she left the impress of 
her character upon her children. Charles Janeway Still*'- 
was their second son. 

His education was at the best schools accessible at the 
time, when the succession of Scotch-Irish clerical tep.«-l.- 
was still unbroken, and the excellent tradition of clas>: 
training they had brought to the New World enjoyed unim- 
paired credit. He studied under one of t]\(.^c, Rev. Dr. 
Steele, in his academy at Abington, Pennsylvania, and then 
at Edge Hill School near Princeton, New Jersey. From 
this he proceeded to Yale in 1S35, and graduated there in 
1839. 'To be a student of Yale was his ambition from an 
early age. In letters to his older brother, written when 
he was but eiffht vears old, he expresses this wish. 

Yale was then under the government of Rev. Jeremiah 
Hay, the successor of the first President Dwight. El 
a man of less inspiring influence, hut a faithful guardian of 
the traditions of this great college. Mr. Stille produced 
a marked impression on his fellow-students both by the 
character of his mental powers and the lofty ideals which 
controlled his conduct. Their respect for him waa shown 
by his being chosen the president ol their literar\ 5 

Brothers in Unity: and on his graduation in 183 



VI 11 



In titlemerff of Cfiarics Jannonj St*W; LL.h. 

nounced a valedictory oration on The Social Spirit,' vvl 
was tlic first of Lis pnhlishecl writings, but which exempli! 
the conservative and ethical spirit that pervades them all. 

lie returned to his Alma Mater again in 18C3, to addi 
her Alumni on the Historical Development of American 
Civilization; 2 and at her hands, in 1808, he : 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws, in recognition 
services to his country, and of the eminent and rcsj 
place to which he had just been called in his native city. 
And in his last will he bequeathed to his Alma Ma; 
third of his residuary estate. 

After his graduation in 18S9 lie entered upon the study 
of the law in the office of Joseph ft. Ingersoll, Esq., then 
anions' the leaders of our citv's bar, and afterwards P 
dent of this Society. lie completed his course and 
rnitted to practice; but his inclination led him rather to the 
fields of literature and of history. lie gratified hu 
for both these by repeated visits to Europe. One of tl 
took him as far as Moskow. He twice visited S\v< 
and on the second 01 these visits, which occurred in 1888, 
he pursued important historical researches in her arcl 
relating to the history oi' the colonists on the Dclav 
He thus obtained and translated trie rtcords of the 
which he afterwards presented to this Society. 

In 1845 he was commissioned by the Governor of iVnu- 
sylvania Second Lieutenant of the "Junior Artil 

1 The Social Siririt *\ Valedictory Oration 
pnrture of the Senior Cia&i from the Swicty of Drol 
College, June 2$, 1S30. By Charlc* Janewaj Stillv. 1*| 
Haven: IS39. 

1 The Historical DeTctoptncnt Of American e. 
before the Society of Gradual of Vale Col! e, Julj > 1) 

Charles J. Stille. Pp. 3-*. New Haven! \- 



Proctcdiflg* ami A'l h-> «.*. \x 

attached to the "First Regiment of Volunteer Artillery/ 1 

and, with his beloved friend W\ Ileyward I>: 
enlisted in the State service at the same time, was • 
ready to perioral military duty when exigencies demanded i 4 . 

It was, however, the war for the Union which g! 
departed friend his opportunity to use his talents fbi 
advantage of his country and of mankind. Two field 
activity were thus opened to him, as a man of letters and as 
a philanthropist, lie became the author of the mos1 im- 
portant pamphlet oi' the struggle, and as a member of the 
United States Sanitary Commission he contributed to the 
humanizing labors which both abated the sufferings and 
horrors of that fraternal but deadly strife, and prepared the 
way for reconciliation of the two sections of our country. 

As we now know, the American people began tlie war 
for the Union with a most inadequate idea of what if was 
to cost them. If indeed the curtain could have been rai 
on what was to come in the terrible four years of its i 
tinuance, and the sacrifice of hundreds of thousands of lives 
on the battle-field and in hospital had been forsccn, they might 
well have shrunk from such a costly undertaking, i 
looked for some other way out of the difficulty. At 
they entered upon the war, if not with a lig] I \ ;' 

any rate with no practical sense of what was ahead of them, 
and with confidence that it would ho brought' to an 
as easily as was the Whiskey Tuusurrcctian. Scv< 
thousand men on a service v( six months were all that the 
President thought necessary, and only a few n with 

General Sherman, what an undertaking was I 
of an area of five hundred thousand square miles, and a 
population of ten millions, most v( thein ^^ the fetme I 
stock as the Nation at larce. 



"The pamphlet is far the best production upon the subject U I 
that I have seen. The reading and re-reading of it bad afforded 
pleasure, and I believe alio some profit. May 1 exj nasi the h"i •- 
you will not allow your pen t-> rest." 

"I have often wi>he J io thank you,"\ write* Dr, K, CI 
11 lor the service you rendered to us all in the dark d 11 1 t/ war, I 
impressive story of 'Jlow a Free People C 



x /// Memory of Ch<>rl.s Jamcay S 7cV, /,/,./ A 

Exactly proportional to tins foolish conli<leitce wore the 
disappointment and disheartenmerd which grew and gatln 
as the years wont by. One hero of the hour aA< 1 ther 
failed the Nation. Capable leadership was Blowly evolved 

by survival of the fittest,. The armies learned bat slowly 
the necessary lessons of discipline and obedience, 
waste of life and the suffering of our soldiers through 
inexperience and incompetence of the bureaus snbsidarj 
the army were terrible. At times it seemed as if I 
struggle must collapse through the inability of the country 
to become really efficient for military purposes. Even in 
the army itself, and anions: its oilicers, there \ 
heart at critical moments. 

It was when this depression was at its worst that Mr. 
Stille published his pamphlet of less than fi rty pages with 
the title: "How a Free People Conduct n Long \\ 
(Philadelphia: 1862). Never was historical scholarship 
ployed more finely for a patriotic purpose. As J have I 
assured by some whom it readied as they labored 1 r 
at the front, that pamphlet itself was an event of the < 
It passed from hand to hand among the officers, and 
read aloud by the more intelligent of the common boW 
It was translated into several of the languages spoken by 
our soldiers, and half a million copies were disirih 
President Lincoln wrote to its author: 



Proceedings and Address. 



M 



■command was on one of the inlands of Port lloyaJ ! Arbor when fir~r I 
saw that work. Everything seemed against us at thai time, 

officers and men were alike despondent. I felt it my duty t > 
words of cheer, lour book fnmishrd mc with th- idea and tl 
ration of a sermon for tlie encouragement of those whom I mipmt in 
. ence, and I had reason to be profoundly glad in the results of the aj»| 

then made to the soldiers who Lad but lately been on the verge of 
I am sure that that work was a moral tonic to many others also. Y 
can never know how much it did [or the cause you espoused so heartily. 
It has occurred to me that it may be pleasant fur you to know of i 
• isolated case of the peculiar advantages of your srory to those then in 
peculiar need." 

Its picture of England in her twenty years' struggle with 
the imperialism of revolutionary France, and of the final 
triumph of the national principle in the liberation <»!' Spain 
from Xapoleon's yoke, was told in terms which made that 
jrreat chanter of history vivid and near to us. The story 
was the more effective because of the spirit which per- 
vaded, it. It was the voice of a soher, dispassionate, conser- 
vative patriotism which made itself heard. The freedom 
of this and tlie supplementary pamphlet 1 from the spirit 
bitterness and recrimination which characterized so much of 
the writing of that time, was especially no: aide In n 
to the latter pamphlet. he says: 

" We differ from Mr. Reed in many things, hut we coxdiallj . 
in his protest against dragging the private life and pers 
our opponents into the arena of party strife. Many, in : 
days, have reached Conclusions directly opp«*ite to those of Mr. 
through a path of duty beset with sore trial.-; and their rememl 
of the sacrifices they have made o( life-Ion;: frtcndshij *, I 
tenderer ties, is too fresh to |ierinit thew to judge, frith imRe 
harshness', the motives of those who may uut a. rec with them." 

1 Northern Interests and Southern rndependence : A Pie* t r I 
Action. Philadelphia: 1S63. 



xii In Memory of Cl><rrlc.< Jai*aco»i 8itHt\ JJ..I). 

But in both the note was one of confidence in the Nation's 

power to maintain its unity, and in its high and I 
purpose to re-establish its authority over the wliolc laud. 
The very sobriety of manner lent added force to the strenu- 
ousness of plea for heroic endurance for an end worthy of 
any sacrifice. 

It was no doubt the admirable quality and infiuc 
the pamphlet which led to Mr. Stillc's lMJing invited 
place on the Standing Committee of the United Bl 
Sanitary Commission, after having served for some time 
first as secretary of its Philadelphia branch. This excellent 
organization took its name from the Sanitary Comnris 
created by the British government in 1855 to click the 
abuses and retrieve the blunders of the medical and e 
missary department of the British army in the Crimean 
"War. It had a similar aim in that it labored to supple- 
ment the imperfect organization and spasmodic action of 
our medical bureau in the opening years Of the 
But it was given by the official class much less than 
the modest scope it asked for, and was forced to turn to 
the people for the moral and material rapport which it 
needed in its efforts io abate the Buffering*, diminish the 
the mortality, and guard against the diseases which atl 
military operations on a large scale. It was the lirsl fore- 
runner of the Geneva Commission and its humane 1. 
on the battle-field. As the work finally shaped itself, the 
Commission was obliged to ask large contributions in lu 
and supplies for the support of Us agents at th- : J ud in 

the hospitals; mid i»u city was more prompt than our own in 
response io this. The erowniug ettori w.»s in tl 
of. ISOo, which occupied Logan Sfilurc for a month, 
secured more than a million dollars for the relief and 



PrGLicdiiiys (uid Address, 



Mil 



teetion of our soldiers. In the managemcul ol the Fair, 

which had the co-operation of our two adjacent Si 

well as our own, Mr. Stiile, as corresponding secretary of 

the Executive Committee, took an active and most useful 
part, and afterwards prepared a history of it, which enables 
many of us to recall the stirring days of popular enthusiasm, 
through which we were then passing. 1 It was therefore 
natural that he was chosen by the national Commission to 
write the history of its labors, when the victory of :!.e 
national cause brought these to a close. His volume on 
this subject 2 is admirable in both spirit and execution. 
Although written and published at a time when the 
national exultation in the triumph of the Union cause had 
made the public indifferent to the blunders which made 
that triumph costly far beyond need, it is pervaded by the 
judicious criticism which was the truest patriotism. The 
purpose was to warn the nation and its rulers against the re- 
currence of such mistakes. As Dr. Stille says in the preface : 

''lie who, at the termination of a snccc.->hil irctr, bestowa indis Timi- 
nate eulogy on all the measures adopted for the prosecution, 
best friend of his country; but rather he. who, having clearly seen its 

shortcoming, does not hoiiatc to expose the evils which have 
from them, and raises a voice of warning a. v ai:^t their recurrence." 

Can we say that the warning was not needed, or that it was 
heeded when the occasion came? The book i tea a 

1 Memorial of the Great Central Fair for the United States Saj I • 
Commi^ion, held in Philadelphia, June, 1SC4. By CI 
Quart.., pp. 211, with three photographic illustration*. Phi 
United States Sanitary Commission, l.Sf.4, 

1 H^tory of the United States Sanitary Communion, bcii 
Report of its Work during the War of tie Ucbellion, I)} CI rlea J. 
StilK'. Octavo, pp. <"V>. Philadelphia : J. B, Lippine tt A CO., IS 



xiv In 3Ic/nor>; of Ckttrles Jonaroj S'-'l,\ LL.D. 

solid and important addition to the historical literature of 
that groat struggle, and a corrective of much ihat has been 
hastily and puiogistieally written of it. 

Another matter, in which Dr. StillC took great into 
about this time, was the ereetion of the statue in honor of 
President Lincoln in Fan-mount Park, and, as President of 
the Lincoln Monument Association, he had a principal port 
at the unveiling of it in 1871. 

The resignation of. Professor Henry Coppee, who in 1SSG 
left the Chair of History and Belles Lett res in the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania to hecome President of the newly 
founded Lehigh University, led to Mr. Stille's being invited 
to fill that place, — a chair consecrated by the memory r.f 
Henry Peed. lie accepted and entered upon its duties 
with characteristic zest, hut was at once impressed with the 
unsatisfactory condition of the University in its collegiate 
department. In its earliest years the College of Philadel- 
delphia — afterwards the University of Pennsylvania— had 
taken the foremost place among the higher instituti 
of learning in America. Its fust provost, Dr. William 
Smith, of whose career our. friend published an account in 
1809, J had attracted students from other colonies, including 
the J3odtish "West Indies. The curriculum of study is now 
recognized by the historians of higher education as the : 
liberal then known in America, and especially as the first 
in which time was given to the sciences of nature. Bn 
later years the institution fell upon evil days and declined in 
importance and efliciem-y, while its medical school incrci 
in both. At last in 1820 — tradition says — -•;•• Freshman 

1 A Mti.oirot* tho ttev, William Smith, D.P., IVovoal i ' '• C 
Asademy and Charitable S-1.-...1 o( IMiila K l^hia. By CL irli ► J. S 
Pp. CO. PJitSadvlpkia : ISCU. 






Proceedings ami Address. 



XV 



presented himself for admission. The trustees sot them- 
selves to restore its fortunes by a complete change of the 
teaching force, and under Provosts Pe Laneey, Ludlow, 
Yethake, and Goodwin there was a slow but steady advance. 
])r. Daniel I\. Goodwin, under whom Professor Still/- labored 
for two years, was especially useful in re-cstal dishing college 
discipline and elevating the tone of the institution. 

Professor. Still e found, however, that no change had been 
made in the course of study for two generations, and no ad- 
dition to its endowment except a single gift of five thou 
dollars. An effort made by Bishop Alonzo Potter in 1842 to 
enlarge and reform the course of study, had come to nothing. 
The later attempt to establish a " School of Mines, Arte, mid 
Manufactures" had resulted in nothing but the erection 
sign-board over the door of an unused room, no money being 
forthcoming in this manufacturing city to set the school on 
foot, and both Trustees and Faculty had come to acqui 
in this condition of affairs as inevitable and permanent. It 
was assured that the City wanted nothing more or hotter, 
and that any attempt to go farther would result in disaster. 

The resignation of Dr. Goodwin in 1SGS, to devote him- 
self entirely to the duties of his chair in the Divinity School 
of the Protestant Episcopal Church, left a vacancy, which the 
Trustees promptly idled by the election of Dr. Stille M 
tenth in the succession of the Provosts. He was inaugurated 
on the 30th of September, 180$, in the Academy of Music, 
and delivered an address ' in which he exhibited the uceds 
of the University, and o\" the city as regarded the i. ; 

.'The Claims of Liberal Culture in Philadelphia. An rnUnvd de- 
livered on the oceasiou of his public inauguration i* Proi 

l'hiver>hy*of Pennsylvania. By Char:- J. Stllle, 1.1. .P. 1'. 



xvi In Memory of Ckartes ./<>,>■ •>-,,, / Stifle, J./..D. 

education, lie had already been trying to stir the 
bones of conservative passivity, and Ins election was an in- 
dication that : the Trustees were awakening to the fact that 
a new era was dawning for higher education in America 
The American college had been a copy of the EhH 
college, when that was at its worst and lowest. The College 
of Philadelphia bad avoided many of these defects through 
the fortunate circumstances of its first Provost being a 
Scotchman, and a graduate of the University of Aberd< 
But both English and Scotch models had ceased to sal 
American educators, who had their attention drawn I Ger- 
many by loner contact with the scholarship of that country. 
This new influence became effective in the decade after the 
close of the war, leading to the establishment 
courses of study in place of the old nniform curriculum, 
which presented the same mental food for all. In this gen- 
eral movement the University began to share before Pro 
Stille's administration, when, in 18G7, clectives were intro- 
duced into the Junior and Senior years of the col 
in Arts. But now new departments were created within the 
College,— that of Science in 1SV2; that oi' Music in 187*3 j 
that of Dentistry in 187S. To ineel the needs o\ the i 
system two things were necessary. The first v.. < 
The two ugly ."barns on Ninth Street, which had rcpln 
old residence of the President of the United States In 11 
were now inadequate In size, and mispla i i - surrounded 
by the city. By purchase on wry low terms from the 
ten acres of irround were procured through Ins assuh 
endeavors, in West Philadelphia, and th« C 
the medical building, the dental building, and the lios] 
were erected dming the provrtetiMp of hr. Stille. 
Ninth Street prc»p*rty was resold to the national govern- 



Proceedings and Address. 



xvn 



ment, at a much higher figure than it got for it in 180L 
By these changes the University obtained adequate accom- 
modation ihv its expansion, in a flesirable quarter of the 
city, and v, as launched upon a new career. When Dr. 
Stille became Provost it was an institution of little note or 
prominence, being often mentioned by residents of our own 
city as " that medical college on Kinth Street.' 5 Under his 
rule it moved rapidly to its rightful place as a leading Amer- 
ican university, in touch with the throbbing life of the new 
time, and doing its share in the scientific and Bcholarly 
labors of an active generation. 

•Its professors were given the stimulus of publicity and 
recognition. Its work was" no" longer eminent merely 
through, the individual' labors of a Hare, a Reed, or a Lcidy, 
but the outflow of a new esprit de corps within the institution. 
Great as have been the changes since Dr. Stille resigned the 
provostship, they are not to be compared with those he 
effected, in reach and value. 

It would be pleasant to be able to add that the city rose 
to the needs of the new era in the University by an adequate 
endowment. But it is impossible to say that it did. One 
splendid gift, the reversion of the estate ef Mr. Henry 
Townc, promised to place the Scientific School above waul 
forever, feut the great collapse of the iron hush. 
the introduction of Bessemer Steel, caused a calamitous re- 
duction of the value of what he had bequeathed, although 
it still remains one of the largest additions to the I n 
resources. Other gifts were obtained, notably the endow- 
ment of the John Welsh chair by the people of the city in 
recognition of that -gentleman's grand services to the city 
during the Centennial year, the gift of ten thousand dollars 
from Mrs. filoomiield Moore for the cduci f women, 



xviii In Memory of Charf.ts Janemitj StilU\ LL.l). 

and the same amount to found the Tohias Waifiicr Libn 

But neither then nor since lias. Philadelphia shown I 
generosity needed for the adequate endowment of a great 

university. The spirit which made Leyden prefer a charter 
for a university to an exemption from taxes, is not lai 
poured out upon our wealthy citizens. There ie rendu 
enough in the community to call for an elective and varied 
system of the higher education, and to scorn that which it 
replaced; hut not the correspondent readiness to pay for it. 
I speak of this frankly, because his pamphlet on his pro- 
vostship shows this to have been one of the disappoint™ 
Dr. Stille felt very keenly. 1 

In the internal administration oft tie University, Dr. Si 
was unwearied in his efforts fur its welfare. Besides his 
own work as professor of history and literature, and at first 
Political Economy, he had direct charge of the discipline, 
oversight and care of the grounds and buildings?, the reception 
of visitors, and the general care of Faculty business. In 
his ideas of discipline he differed widely from his prede- 
cessor, perhaps not appreciating the condition of aiiairs 
which Dr. Goodwin found there in-lSCO. He leaned to 
side of mercy and patience, laboring t<> win the i • •:/ 1 i 
the pupil's and to inftueircc them for irood through land] 

• "To a singular extent," write.-* one yf Ids pupils, " Dr, SdlkS lived 

in and for the University. . . . fn History-ami l->..! : -h I 

his peculiar branches of (n>truetion, he w:h uii hi | . . hut 

more than tliat—perliajy* uncoii>ei«»u*ly to hit. i^ If- In - 

affections of his pupils ami -> imprc~ed up »u ll 

reality of goodneV?< r that (hi* impfc-^tui m-hlty survive* ta y\ 

separation and the friction* of active lit"--." 






» Remiuiscenees of a Prnv.-t, 1>< 1- '• rt I 
'mminimjucaW." IV- :,N - HiitoMi'M* iTiv; ,]. 



Proceedings and Address. xix 

He showed a persona] interest in them, especially in 
those who were struggling for an education in the la- 
difficulties which would have deterred less stout hearts. It 
came out quite incidentally that he visited some of them in 
their homes, when they were kept from their work by 
serious illness, and he showed a similar concern in the h 
of his associates in the Faculty. He was always the first to 
recognize any evidence of ability in the younger members 
of the Faculty, and to rejoice in their promise of useful] 
He took a personal interest in their welfare which evil) 
his sincere regard for their success and happiness. When 
any publication of theirs attracted favorable attention, he 
was among the first to praise it. His colleagues were to 
him not mere instruments to an end, even though that were 
the success of the University. They were human being.-, 
to be thought for and considered as such. 

For those of his colleagues who were his seniors in the 
Faculty, he showed an esteem which amounted to reverence, 
— for John F. Frazer, the versatile and encyclopedic pro- 
fessor of natural science; for George Allen, the gei 
cultivated professor of Greek, who won the love ol 
pupils; for E. Otis Kendall, the high-toned CI ri ti in gcutlc- 
man, at whose funeral I last met Dr. Still-': for CI.. 
Forteriield Erauth, the superb scholar in philosophy 
theology, whose vast attainments even were less impressive 
than his courtesy, his friendliness, and his unwearied : ^ 
ness; for Francis A. Jackson, last survivor of noW< 
and not less worthy than any. 

One feature of Dr. Stillc's policy m Provost was t.. bring 
the University into relation with the school systei 
city by the establishment of city scholarships foe L r v^\ 
of the public schools, his interest in which is i 



xx In Memory of CkoHes Janc\ray Sttlle, LL.Jj. 

by his service as President of the Board of Direct n 
the Eighth School Section of Philadelphia. Under his 

provostship, as well as that of his successor, this fa 
effected and extended as a matter of compensation to the 
city for grants of land to the University. He moved iu 
matter with hearty interest in the class thus beneGl 
being convinced that the University nrost be broadly b 
in popular esteem before it could attain iu proper | 
the hierarchy of our educational institutions. For the e 
reason he took the first of the few steps winch have I 
taken to extend facilities for the higher education of wo: 
The Centennial Exhibition, which occurred during 
occupancy of the office, and after whose success lie lab 
in many ways, laid especial claims on him, which he met 
more than amply. Scholars and educators of cmiu 
who visitedour city during that memorable summer, found 
in him a cordial and hospitable representative of (J 
intellectual life, and many of them entered into friendly 
correspondence with him which lasted the rest of his 
The Swedish Commissioner, Hcrr Dannefeldt, wi 
his welcome guest, as coming from the original home of the 
Stille family.- Also Baron Ilernielin, who laid chargi 
the exhibit of Fine Arts sent out by Sweden, a very charm- 
ing, man and an accomplished painter in oils, who became a 
dear and intimate friend of Dr. StllKs It lYUfl in taking the 
Swedish Commissioners to the anniversary of I 
Church', that he acquired his own interest in tl rable 

parish, founded by Swedish Lutherans, in whose eh 
yard rest the remains vf several of his ancestors! IK 
generously, fromthat time to it> support, and 
third of his residuary estate, to preserve intact the vcnei 
building in which his forefathers hud worship] 



Proceedings and Address. xxi 

The University kept open house that year and the noble 
and cultivated Emperor of Brazil was one of thousands 
who visited the University, hut the only one who had the 
indiscretion to select seven o'clock in the morning for his 
visit, Jfor was it 'only during the Centennial year that Dr. 
Stille/s hospitable home was open to such visitors. He loved 
to gather around his hospitable table whatever was most 
individual in intellect, most representative of the best in the- 
life of the city, and especially men of a somewhat earlier 
' generation than his own, on whom he looked with rever- 
ence. His annual birthday dinner to Mr. Henry C. Carey 
was an especially notable occasion, when such men as Joseph 
It. Chandler, General Robert Patterson, Morton McMichael, 
"William D. Lewis, George W. Childs, John Welsh, and 
John "W. Forney gathered to do honor to the greatest of 
American economists, and to express their hope that he 
miebt add manv more years to those he had used so well. 

.His provostship ceased in 18S0, and his occupancy of the 
John Welsh professorship a year later. His resignation 
grew out of his disagreement with the Board of Trustees 
on three important points. The first of these was his con- 
viction that the Provost should be a member of the board, 
as in our other universities. The second was his contention 
that discipline over the students should be vested abso- 
lutely hi the Faculty, without allowing any appeal from 
' their decisions. The third was the necessity of a united 
effort to place the finances of the University on such a foot- 
ing as would lift the burden of debt and put an end to 
annual deficits in the income. "When his resignation was 
announced his colleagues in the Faculty spontaneously and 
formally Expressed their regret at its occurrence, and their 
hope that some way might be found to meet his wishes on 



xxii In. Memory of Chnrbs Jiweiwy Stillc, l^L.D. 

the two iir.st points. But no shell basis of agreement was 
found possible. 

His successor in the office of Provost, in his Inaugural 
delivered in February of the following vcar, bore just testi- 
mony to the diameter and wdrtlj of Dr. Stille's services to 
the University. 



"It is impassible,' ' said Dr. William Pepper, <; to pass from this 
hasty summary of the advances in the strength and organization of the 
various departments of the University without pausing to pay a tribute 
of hearty admiration to the leader in this onward movement, to whose 
sustained enthusiasm and ceaseless energy its success is largely due. The 
task of inaugurating extensive changes in a long-established in-titution, 
— of arousing wide-spread interest and zeal at a time when they had 
flagged, — of organizing a complicated and yet thoroughly practicable 
system of education in two of the most important departments of the 
University, — of collecting a corps of highly competent teachers, imbued 
with earnestness and lofty aims similar to his own, — of winning the con- 
fidence of the community, the cordial co-operation of his colleagues, 
and the respect and affection of the students, — this task was indeed one 
requiring rare qualities as a:i organizer, a leader, a teacher, and a man. 
As an alumnus of the University, as a teacher in one of its departments 
during the period referred to, and now a* the represent alive of the Board 
of Trustees, I can testify to the general feeling of admiration for the 
work done, and for him who bore so hive a share of the burden. Well 
for our beloved University was it that at such a crisis in her history-, so 
able and devoted a leader wa- found. The good work he has done will 
long survive his departure from his official position ; and when, in the 
distant future, the historian of this University shall record the services 
of those who have most contributed to her proud position, among the 
foremast must stand the name of Charles J. Stillc." 






The retirement of Dr. Stille from the |>io\ostshi}\ after 
twelve years of memorable service, fcfi him free for those 
historical studies, which had !*«•» he«-n the favorite employ- 
ment of his leisure. The years of his [irovostship naturally 



Proeoyft ngs and Addrc, 



XX 11 1 



were not those of groat production. A biographical sketch 

of Horace. JBiniicy, Jr., in 1870, l a criticism of a plan to 
import the Harvard Examination of Girl's Schools into our 
City, 2 and a volume of studies in medieval history (dedicated 
to his .life-long friend, the Hon. John T. Clark Hare), 3 which 
grew out of the lectures of his professorship, constitutes the 
scanty harvest of his years as a teacher and provost. He 
now took the study of American history, especially oi' the 
colonial and revolutionary -periods of Pennsylvania history, 
in a manner both vigorous and fruitful of good results. 
There was need of such labors, if our State was to obtain 
the proper share of recognition for services rendered in that- 
great struggle. Up to the appearance of Mr. Bancroft's 
History of the United States, in 1834 and the years follow- 
ing, the early story of the country had been told mostly in 
a spirit hostile to Xew England, and with an evident pur- 
pose to make the most of the faults and the unhappy occur- 
rences of that section. Mr. Bancroft, with laudable devo- 
tion to his native State, set. himself to redeem the balance, 
but, as is not unusual, went much too far in the other direc- 
tion. In the first edition of his history a brief was held for 
nearly everything that had been done by the colonists and 
the patriot leaders of that section. Men like Samuel Adams 
were not Only awarded their full meed of praise for their 
real services, but were set up as a standard by which the 



1 A Memoir of Horace I!inney, Jr., read at a Meeting of the Union 
League of Philadelphia, June 1, 1SV0. £p, 24. Philadelphia: Henry 
1>. Ashtne:"!, 1 S. 0. 

'The Higher Education of Women and the Harvard Examination. 
In the Pom Monthly for February, 1S7S. l'p. J>3- 10 I. 

3 Studies in Medieval History. Pp. 47-"». Philadelphia I J. B. Lip- 
pincott A Co., ISS2. 



xxiv In Mnn>:>rj of Charles Jancwu.y Stifle, LL.D. 

popular leaders m other parts of the country, and especially 
in Philadelphia, were to be judged. The Boston method of 
procedure was the ideal method for Mr. Bancroft, and the 
more cautious and conservative course taken by the trained 
lawyers' of Philadelphia, was contrasted with it as tending 
to the pusillanimous. And what Mr. Bancroft did his 
successors in Xew England outdid, until an impression 
had been created that American history had been trans- 
acted in Boston and its vicinity, and that "Washington and 
Frankhn were the only men of real leadership in that time 
who were not residents of that favored section. Thanks to 
the judicious editing of Mr. Bancroft's great work by Presi- 
dent Scott of Rutgers, the most of these unfair judgments 
have been eliminated from, the hook, but their echoes arc 
heard in every work on that period which emanates from 
the Kew England press. Even our own writers have caught 
the infection, and one of these rpiitc recently, in an otherwise 
excellent history of our city, expresses a judgment of our 
revolutionary patriots which is as unjust as it is unfortunate. 
To set our colonial revolutionary history in its proper 
light was the chief purpose of Dr. Slide's literary activity 
in his later years. In 1SS5 he contributed to the Proceed- 
ings of this Society a paper on " Religions Tests in Penn- 
sylvania,''' showing the limits set by English law to the 
policy of religious equality inaugurated by Penh. In 1SS7 
he contributed a striking paper on a Beaumarchais and the 
<Lost Million'" to the Pennsylvania Magazine of History 
and Biouraphy (April number : pp. 1—36, with portrait), 
and in 18SS he wrote for it "The Life and Services of Joel 
E. Poinsett," the Confidential Agent in South Carolina of 
President Jadisoh during the X unification Troubles of 1SS2 
(pp. 84). In ISoS he also contributed to the Papers of the 



Proceedings and Address* xxv 

American. Historical Association one in which he disputed the 
claim of Virginia to have been in advance of Pennsylvania in 
adopting in 1 790 the principle of entire religious toleration. 
In 3 890 he gave the Pennsylvania Magazine a paper on 
"Pennsylvania and the Declaration of Independence" (pp. 
47) in which he began his vindication of our revolutionary 
patriots from the unjust aspersions which had been cast upon 
them, of " timidity/ 5 " weakness/' and " want of patriotism." 
This was the forerunner of the edition of the works of John 
Dickinson, undertaken by this Society, to which Dr. Stille 
furnished the first or biographical volume/ leaving the edit- 
ing of Dickinson's writings to another hand. The work 
is one of the greatest importance for the understanding of 
the time, dealing as it does, with the career of the ablest po- 
litical writer in defence of the patriotic cause, — a man whose 
state papers were praised by Lord Chatham in terms almost 
of hyberbole. It shows the complications which existed in 
the situation of affairs in this commonwealth, and which 
presented difficulties that only the finest sagacity could deal 
with. And it sets the work not only of Dickinson, but of 
General Mifflin, Charles Thomson, Benjamin Rush, and other 
patriots of the time, in the right light for historic judgment. 
A fit complement to this important work is presented by 
his biography of Major-General Anthony Wayne.' The 
popular impression of this bravo man and true patriot has 
been derived not from any acquaintance with his career, but 

1 The Life and Times of John Dickinson, 1732-1$'"'$. Prepare*] nt 
the Kequest of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Pp. -13$, with 
portrait. Philadelphia : IS02. 

* Major*Gencral Anthony "Wayne and the Pennsylvania Line in the 
Continental Army. By Charles J. Stille, President of the Historical 
Society of Pennsylvania. Pp. 10 au« I -141, with Pott-ait. Philadelphia: 
J. IB, Lippincott Company, 1803, 



; 



xxvi In Memory of Charles Janaray Stiltt, LL.T). 



' 



from a stray epithet applied to him by a drunken soldier in a 

moment of irritation. But he whom .men have called " Ma J 
Anthony Wayne" was one of the most cautions and eapable 
commanders of the Continental army, and as such enjoyed 
the confidence of the Commander-in-chief in an unusual 
degree. As he showed at the capture of Stony Point, he 
was ready for the most perilous task to which duty called 
him; but in every situation he exhibited the forethought 
and the steadiness of a born soldier. In Dr. Stille's work 
he becomes intelligible to us in his true character and his 
solid worth, as a conservative citizen, a capable commander, 
and a gentlemen of the finest instincts. 

Dr. Stille's last important piece of work was his historical 
introduction to the biography of Dr. George Logan of Sten- 
ton, the grandson of the Secretary of our Quaker Founder, 
and himself the friend and supporter of Thomas Jefferson. 
The biography is by Dr. Logan's brilliant and estimable 



wife, and was published by this Society at the instance of 
their grandchild. It was Dr. Stille's part to embody what 
we know of its subjects from memoirs and letters published 
since it was written, and this lie has done amply and well. 

These books and a few pamphlets l of less importance con- 
stitute the literary and historical labors of his later years, 
during eight of which he served this Society as its President. 
By his example, by his publications, and by his generous 
bequests, he encourages this Society to proceed with the 

1 Silas Deane, Diplomatist of the Revolution. A paper read before 
the Society of the Colonial Dames of Pennsylvania. Pp. 20. Pbila- 
<k-lj.hi:> : 1S1»4. 

The Historical Inflations of Christ Church, Philadelphia, with the 
I'lovin.-e of IVnn-ylvania. Au address delivered at the Two Hundredth 
Anniversary of Christ Church, 2vovember 19, ISOo. Pp. 27. Phila- 
delphia: 1S90. 



Procccduigs and Addnss. xxvii. 

good work of setting in fair light the work of tlic fathers 
and founders of the Commonwealth. 

In private life Dr. Stilie was an example of tlie solid Chris- 
tian virtues which are at once the ornament and the best 
support of society. lie was a devoted and tender hushand 
to the honored wife, who survives to mourn her loss in his 
death, and who encouraged him in his labors for the public 
good. Especially "beautiful was his relation to his niece and • 
adopted daughter Miss Anna Dulles, daughter of the Rev. 
John "Welsh Dulles, and his wife, the noted missionary, 
Harriet L. Winslpw* Her line intellect arid her beautiful 
spiritual character matured in the atmosphere of his home, 
and became to him at once a delight and an aid in his 
labors. To her he read his works in manuscript, relying on 
her fine tact and judgment for suggestion and correction. 
To her he turned for the playful gaiety, with which youth 
cheers our acre. Her death some three years asro .was a 
blow which he never ceased to feel. No less strong and 
tender were the affections which bound him to his kindred, 
especially his older and surviving brother. For more than 
fifty years, no matter what the weather might be, he paid 
his weekly visit to Dr. Alfred Stillc, until his filling health 
made exposure dangerous to him. And even then he often 
scanned the winter skies in hope of a break in their threat- 
cnings, which would permit of his going, lie was not a 
man who starved the affections of the inner eircle, to give 
his strengh to public objects, but one who found in that 
circle the best stimulus to public duty. 

Of his religious life, 1 need only say that it was sincere, 
devout, and earnest, burning with a quiet and unchecked 
fervor through all his \vars. His life was always puiv ami 
upright. He loved whatever was excellent and of good re- 






xxviii In Mtimry of Charles Janeway.StUle, LL.l). 

port, and lie thought on these things. His copy of the 

Bible and of the Imitation of Christ, always on his desk, 
gave indication of his constant and loving use. 

lie was sincerely loyal to the Protestant Episcopal com- 
munion, and Ins attachment to the venerahle Dr. Morton, 
iff H'fUa 7(on dmmadus laura, a Trustee of the University, I. 
always thought one of the most beautiful things in his life 
as I saw it. His intimacy with his rector, Mr. Phillips 
Brooks, was very close, and the latter frequently visited 
him at his home. For many years he was a -member of 
the Council of the " Church Home for Children," and was 
greatly interested in the " Home of the Merciful Saviour 
for Crippled Children/' to both of which institutions he 
left liberal bequests. But his churchmanship involved no 
narrowing of his sympathies, as was shown by his warm 
friendship for Rev. Dr. Henry A\ r . Bellows of Xew York, 
whom he learned to know and to esteem in their labors in 
the Sanitary Commission. For twenty-five years he was a 
sojourner during the summer at Lake Mohonk, and passed 
much of his time there in pleasant intercourse with Doctors 
Philip Schaft' and Theodore L. Cuyler, constant visitors at 
that place. 

When at last the end came, he had reached the four score 
years which the Psalmist specifies as the farther bound of 
human life. He died at the Hotel Brighton in Atlantic 
City, on the morning of August 11, 1899. But those who 
mourned his loss looked back upon those eighty years with 
the knowledge that they had been spent for useful end-, 
and were stained by nothing base. 

So we add his name to the list oi^ the worthies of Phila- 
delphia, — a- long anil noble series, among whom he takes 
an honored place through hl.-> labors, his influence, and his 
character, all of which told for social food. 






THE 



PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE 



OF 



HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY, 



Yol. XXIV. . 1900. No. 1. 



"THE A3I.EKICAX SOCIETY HELD AT PHILADELPHIA 
FOP PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE.'' 

CONTRIBUTED BY MRS. W. LANE VERLKNDLX. 

[Tjiat two contemporary societies, organized for the same object, — the 
advancement of useful knowledge, — should eventually unite, was to be 
expected from the character of their membership. The transactions 
which led to the union of these societies, "The American Society held 
at Philadelphia for Promoting Useful Knowledge," with "The American 
Philosophical Society," have been extracted from the records of the 
last-named society.] 

MhtH/es of February £>, 176$. 

" The following Paper from sundry Gentlemen of this 
City was read, viz. 

"A Society having subsisted for some time in this City under the 
name of the American Society held at Philadelphia for promoting and 
prop: gating useful Knowledge, whose Views have been nearly the same 
with theK> which are published of the American Philosophical Society, 
and it being judged that the Ends proposed by both could he c.uried out 
with more advantage to the Public if an Union could take Place between 
them, it i- proposed that such Union may take place. 

VOL. XXIV.— 1 ( 1 ) 



' 



2 The American &yekty fcW at Philaddj&ki. 

"Charles Thomson, Edmund Physiek, Isaac Paschal, John Morgan, 
Samuel Towel, Joseph Paschal, Owen Kiddie, Clement Bidrtle, \V" 
Bettle, Isaac Bartrani, Moses Bartrani, John Dickinson, Cadwalader 
Evans, Nicholas Wain, Benjamin Davis, John Lukens, Thomas Mifflin, 

David Evans, James Pearson, 

1 * G&rresp&n ding JAv?.' ber*. 
"David Rrttenhouse, W* Henry, of Lancaster, W" Johnson, of Caro- 
lina, Sam 1 Lard, of Xew York. 

" On perusal of this paper, signifying the Desire of those 
Gentlemen of uniting our common Design for the more 
effectually promoting useful Knowledge — it was resolved, 

"That tbey be introduced auiorg us by Election ; and on this Occa- 
sion to dispense with that Part of Rule made at the last meeting for 
members, which requires their being proposed at a previous meeting, 
and the List of their Names being read to the Society, it was agreed to 
•proceed immediately to ballot for them, and they were accordingly chosen 
agreeably to said List. 

"KB. Mr. Dickinson, Mr.' Lukens, Charles Thomson 
and Dr. Evans, having been formerly chosen in this Society 
are left at Liberty to come in om this, or their former Elec- 
tion ; and Mr. Rittenhouse being only an honorary member 
in the above List and being a regular member of this 
Society, and having by Letter signified his Desire of joining 
it, any Election of Him, was thought unnecessary." 

Minutes of Febrwty 0, 176& 

"Messrs Bond and Smith, reported that 'the Gentlemen 
of the American Society' had requested a copy oi' the min- 
utes, and had recM.it with the following letter, viz. 

"Gent.- — According to our Promi-e we semi you the Minutes, tho' we 
believe our Authority was only to ivad it to VQU, hut not to copy it, be- 
cause it was drawn up in Haste, and is not revised by any Order of the 
Society. However we give it, in Trust that will not think it proper to 
enter on your Books, till it is entered on ours ; for that might occasion 
Dittiealty in making any alteration, should any be judged expedient by 
you and us. 

"We have only to add, that everything respecting you itas conducted 
with the greatest marks of Kegard ; and that the same good Disposition 



I 

i 

i 
a 

: 



• 1 



The American Society held at Philadelphia. 3 

appeared among our members which your Paper declares of yours, for 
uniting our common Detijrn, for Lhc advancement of T'.-eful Knowledge. 

" Jt was agreed among us not to admit any new Proposal of Members, 
besides yours, at ou r !a<t Effecting; nor to proceed to the Election of Officers, 
which was to have been the Lkiaiuess of that Night, but to postpone this 
and every other Matter till next Tuesday, when you have an opportunity 
of being present to give your Votes and Advice. We are, with great 
Respect &c." 

Xtimdcs of March S, 17GS. 

" Minute of the American Society Feby 2 d read & ordered 
to be inserted in our minutes, viz. — 

"Tuesday Feby S' h 17GS. At a meeting of the American Society for 
promoting and propagating useful Knowledge, held at Philadelphia : — 

"The Minute of the American Philosophical Society of the 2'* Inst. 
which declares our Election into that Society, being considered it was 
unanimously determined, that as it was not on the Terms proposed, we 
are under the necessity of declining the union. Ordered that the Secre- 
tary deliver a Copy of the Minute to a Member of the Philosophical So- 
ciety, to be laid before them — 

"Owen P.idpi.i;, 

"Secy for the time being." 

Minutes of November 15, 17 OS. 

'•'This Society having been informed that there is a Disposition in the 
Members of the American Society for promoting useful Knowledge, to 
unite with us, & that they would appoint a Committee to treat wiih a 
Committee of this Society upon the Subject ; and we being desirous to 
promote such a Union do appoint I) r Shippen, D r Bond, Mr. Syng, Pr. 
Khoad-, D r Smith <£ l) r Ewing to be a Committee to concert Measures 
& prepare the way for such Union, & to make report of their Proceed- 
ings to the next Meeting." 

Minutes of December 20,. 1768. 

"The Committee ... to confer . . . acquainted the So- 
ciety that they hud drawn ttp their Report in Writing; which 
being twice read, an addition was proposed to the 4 :h Ar- 
i'Ho & some alteration in the 5^ ami S : \ and some memhers 
from the other fcecktjj having ;., the meantime delivered a 
message to this Society, importing that the. other Society 
were now met on Purpose to Wait the Result ^ this So- 



4 The Ameriecm Society laid at Philadelphia. 

cioty concerning the plan of Union; IV Smith and P r Ship- 
pen jun r were appointed to aeeoinpany the said members to 
lay before tliem the Proposed uddiiiyn and alteration*, who 
being returned, informed this Society tlwit tlie same were 
cheerfully agreed to by the other Society. Then ordered 
that the Report & Article:- as now amended, be entered on 
the minutes as finally settled, as follows, viz. 

"The Committee appointed at Inst meeting of this Society to confer 
with the Commitiec of the American Society held at Philad* for pro- 
moting useful Knowledge .0:0 report that they had twice met the said 
Committee in order to prepare the way for uniting both Societies agree- 
able to the Instructions given them 

"That the first meeting was at Mr. Bryne'son Tuesday Evening, No- 
vember the G ;V ' ; and the whole Terms as then settled are as follows, viz. 

"Whereas two Societies subsist in this City, whose Views and Ends 
are the same, viz. The Advancement of useful Knowledge- ; and it being 
judged that their Union would he of public Advantage ; it was agreed 
that such Union should take place, on Term? of perfect Equality ; & for 
that Purpose it was therefore reasonable — 

"That a new Name, made out of the former Nantes of both should be 
fixed for the United Society, and the following Name wns accordingly 
agreed to, viz. 

"The American Philosophical Society, held at Philadelphia, for pro- 
moting Useful Knowledge. 

"2. That besides the members which stand proposed, no new Mem- 
bers be proposed or elected by either Society till this Treaty is finished. 

"3. That the first meeting oi the united Society he at the College on 
Monday the 2' 1 of January next, at G o'Clock in the Evening. 

"-i. That there shall be one Patron, one President, one Treasurer, 
four Secretaries & three Curators ; ec that all the said Officers be 
chosen by Ballot, at the first meeting, viz. the said l x Day of January ; 
(excepting only that instead of electing a Patron, a. Committee 01 the 
united Society be appointed at said meeting to wait on the Governor of 
the Province & to request him to l.»j Patron) which Officers shall con- 
tinue in their Respective OHiccs till the lir.-t muting of the Ink 
ciety which. shall be in January 177o; when .v. at every !ir-t meeting 
of January wnieh shall he in -every Year there shall be a new Election of 
Oilicers'. 

" C>. That after the Union a Committee he appointed to form a new 
Sett of Paws, taking in what may he thought- proper out of the former 
Laws of both &ocivti< *. 

"G. That each Society, before the first oi January pay off their lie- 



The Ainerii'-an Socldj held at Philadelphia. 5 

spective Debts and the Treasurers of the former Societies sltall Account 
& settle with the New Treasurer to be chosen & pay him the Balances 

in their Hands. 

M 7. That the Books & all the Curiosities &c of the former Societies be 
deposited in the Cabinet or elsewhere as the United Society shall direct. 

"8. That in the joint Publication which it may be thought proper to 
make of the Transactions of the former Societies, no preference shall he 
given to the Papers of cither, but they shall be arranged tN: digested 
according to their Subjects & Dates. 

"9. That there shall he a New Bock of the future Transactions of the 
United Society, beginning with the follow ing Preface, or Declaration, viz. 

"Whereas [a repetition of the above] 

"This Book therefore is to contain only the Transactions of the 
United Society under the Name aforesaid. What further relates to the 
Terms of union, as, well as the former Transactions of each Society, being 
antecedent to the Commencement of this Book, may be found in the old 
Books deposited in the Cabinet." 

The united Societies met in January of 17G9, upwards of 
eighty members being present. 

The "Rules and Statutes,'' together with " The Obliga- 
tion." and a list of the " Fellows and Corresponding Mem- 
bers of the American Society," with fae-similics of their 
autographs are taken from the original Minute Book at 
the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 

[Title page.] 
RULES AND STATUTES 

01 

THE AMERICAN SOCIETY 

IIF.LD AT 

PHILADELPHIA 

FOR 

PROMOTING USEFUL KNOWLEDGE 

TOGETHER WITH 

A LIST OF THE FELLOWS AND CORRESPONDING 

MEMBERS. 






The American Society hid at PhUertJelphia. 

RULES ' 

OF 

THE AMERICAN SOCIETY 

HELD AT Till LA DELPHI A 

FOE PE03IOTIXG USEFUL KXOWXEDGR 



1. This Society shall consist of a President, Fellows & 
corresponding Members. AVhen any person is proposed for 
a fellow or corresponding member, his name shall he written 
on a card and hung up in the room, and his election shall 
be on the second evening after he is proposed. 

2. The Election of Fellows and corresponding members 
shall be by ballot. A majority of the members present 
shall be necessary for the election of a corresponding mem- 
ber, but the consent of four fifths of the company met shall 
be required to elect a fellow. 

3. Every fellow after he is elected shall subscribe the fol- 
lowing ObttgoMon upon his being admitted into the Society 
or his election shall be void. 

We who have hereunto subscribed do \ romi^e each for himself to pro- 
mote the good of the American Soeiety held at Philadelphia for promot- 
ing. useful knowledge, raid to pursue the ends for which' the same was 
founded ; we will be present at the meetin_r- of the ^Society as oft a* con- 
veniently we can and will observe the Statutes ami l)r«leH of the said 
Society, provided that whenever any of \\- A\A\ signify to the President 
under his hand th:it he desires to withdraw from the Society, he shall be 
free from this Obligation. 

4. Every fellow shall' pay the <nm of Ten ahWngs as ad- 
mission money and after .cards every year the sum of Ten 
Shillings as a eonU'ibutmh f«»r iletVayins the charges of Ob- 
servations experiments »ve of the Society. 






The American Society held at Philathlphia. 7 

5. The ordinary JLrf.ni'js of the Society shall be once a 
week, namely on friday evening, from the 22 1 of September 
to the 22' 1 of march at 6 ocloek, and from the 23 d of march 
to the 23 J of September at 7 ocloek. Business to begin at 
half an hour after the time of meeting and not to be con- 
tinued after 11 ocloek. 

6. The Ihmt(C>s of the weekly meetings shall be to order, 
take account, consider and discourse of philosophical experi- 
ments and observations; to read, hear and discourse upon 
"letters and reports, and other papers containing philosophical 
matters, as for instance the productions t tnd varieties of 
nature and Art, all new discovered plants, herbs, trees, roots 
&c, their natures, virtues, uses eve methods of propagating 
them and making such as are useful but peculiar to some 
plantations and countries, more general; Improvements of 
vegetable, juices as cyders, wines eve new methods of curing 
or preventing Diseases ; all new discovered fossils in different 
countries, particularly in America, as Mines Minerals, quar- 
ries tve new and useful Improvements in any branch of 
mathematics; new discoveries in chymestry viz in distilla- 
tion, brewing assaviiw of Ores kc: new mechanical iuven- 
tions' for saving of labour, as mills, carriages &c and for 
raising and carrying off water, draining meadows &c, all new 
arts, trades, manufactures kc that may be proposed or thought 
of, and all improvements in those already known: the best 
methods of improving our lands, recovering soils that are 
worn out guarding our fruits, trees, and plants from worms 
and insects; improving the hived oi^ useful Animals: intro- 
ducing others from foreign countries, the best methods of 
making and mending highways; improving inland naviga- 
tion, the course ami junction of Rivers, surveys, charts and 
maps of particular parts of the seacoasts or inland coun- 
tries ^ situation of kikes, mountains eve; nature of the soil| 
productions See, and in short every thing relating to the pro- 
moting of arts ami Sciences, improving of- agriculture, farm- 
ing, gardening, trade, commerce, and the general advance- 
ment of useful knowledge. Experiments when necessary 



8 



Th.c American Society held at Philadelphia. 



to he made at the charge mid defrayed out of the common 
Stock of the Society. — 

7. The standing officers of the Society shall he & President 
Viecprcsidcnt, two Secretaries three euraturs of natural history 
(viz one for each kingdom) & a Treasurer. 

8. The President or in his Absence the vice president or 
in the absence of both such fellow as the Society shall nomi- 
nate for the time being, shall preside in all meetings, regu- 
late all debates of the Society, state and put all questions, 
call for reports and accounts from committees and others, 
summon all extraordinary meetings upon urgent occasions 
and see to the Execution of the statutes and orders of the 
Society. In case the President or viccpresident during the 
term of his or their Office shall die, recede or he removed, 
then and so often it shall be lawful for the Society met 
together to choose one of their number for president or vice- 
president, who shall have and exercise the Office of Presi- 
dent or viccpresident for the remainder of the year. 

9. The Viccpresident shall keep a Statute book, wherein 
are to be fairly written all the laws, Statutes and constitu- 
tions made or to be made concerning the government and 
regulation of the Society; also a list of the fellows & cor- 
responding members of the Society. 

10. Of the Secretaries one shall be .called the Secretary 
and the other the corresponding Secretary. The Secretory 
shall keep a Register book, and enter therein all such dis- 
coveries, Inventions, Observations and histories of natural 
and artificial things as may be ordered. The dorrespondwg 
Secretary shall keep a Letter. book and fairly copy therein 
all letters from the Society, and all such letters and extracts 
of Letters to the Society as May he ordered. 

11. The Trvewi rcr shall receive and keep account ot^ all 
the Money due to the Society and discharge all money pay- 
able by the Society. lie shall pay small >ums by order o{ 
the President or viccpresident under his hand, but those 
that ex'eeed ton shillings by order oi' the Society. The Ac- 
counts of the Treasurer shall be audited twice a year by a 






• 



The American Society held at Philadelphia. 9 

committee of the Society ami a State of them laid before 
the Society at their last meetings in October ami April. 
The treasurer shall give boiul ami security lor the faithful 
performance of his duty and the trust reposed in Kim. 

3 2. Every Fellow except the President, Yieepresident and 
Secretaries for the time being shall serve as Journalist, four 
weeks in his turn according to the order of his name in 
the Society's books. The Business of the Journalist shall 
be briefly to enter in a book to be provided for that pur- 
pose, the transactions of each meeting with the titles of 
such papers and specimens &c as shall be laid before the 
Society. 

18. The Election of standing Officers, which shall be by 
ballot, shall be held once a year, viz at the last meeting of 
the month of April to enter upon their Offices on the anni- 
versary of the Society. 

14. The first day of May provided it fall not on a Sun- 
day, in which case the preceding day shall be celebrated as 
the anniversary of the Society; on which day the Society 
shall dine or sup together the better to preserve that friend- 
ship, which is proposed by the Members. 

15. The cause- of removing any officer or ejecting any 
member shall be for negligence in the atlairs of the Society, 
after receiving three respective admonitions, for fraudulent 
dealing for contemptuous disobedience to the laws and orders 
of the Society or for defaming or maliciously damaging the 
same. 

1G. The names of Benefactors shall be honourably men- 
tioned in a book to be provided for that purpose, which book 
shall be kept by the G<irafor$ and in it shall be partic- 
ularized the respective donations of the Benefactors. 

17. In case of death or the recess of any fellow, the Nice- 
president shall note it in the margin of the List in the statute 
book over against his name. 

18. When any matter come* before the Society, the fel- 
lows who speak to it, shall deliver their sentiments in as 
plain and concise a manner as they can. One only shall 



10 The American Society hdd at Ph&uddphia. 

speak at a time and none shall address the chair without 
standing. 

19. A Correspondence shall he attempted and kept up 
with other Societies of the same nature in Europe and else- 
whore. 

20. To render this Society more and more serviceable to 
the community and to encourage every man to excel in his 
respective profession, calling, tntde or occupation, and to 
promote industry and labour and to advance the manual 
arts, part of the stock of tlie Society shall be appropriated 
to he given in rewards and premiums to such merchants, 
artisans manufacturers and others as shall make any capital 
Improvements in their several branches, and likewise to such 
as shall make any important discovery and advancement in 
the arts of '"agriculture or anything relating thereto (as farm- 
ing, grazing <\:e) in minerology, metalurgy &c as the Society 
shall think proper from time to time. 

21. When any useful discoveries are made either by new 
Inventions or by the improvement of the old, these shall be 
published by the Society in the plainest and most intelligible 
manner and pains taken to introduce them into common 
practice, that all may reap benefit from them. 

22. To every corresponding member a certificate shall be 
sent in form as follows. 

A. ]}. is duly admitted a corresponding member of the 
American Society held at Philadelphia for promoting useful 

knowledge. Dated . . *. Day of a.d Signed 

by order of the Society CD. corresponding Secty. 

23. Any corresponding member being in Philadelphia 
shall have liberty to attend the stated meetings of the Society, 
and if at any lime he chusc to sign the Obligation, pay admis- 
sion money and the. yearly contribution he shall be deemed 
a fellow. 

24. No corresponding member, who is not a fellow, shall 
have any voice in electing members, enacting or repealing 
laws, for the government of the Sovivty, <»r in the disposal 
of anv money or effects of the Society. 



The Ariierkan Society held at Philadelphia. 



11 



gfoe ©Mioatlon. ■ 

We -who have hereunto subscribed do promise each for 
himself to promote the good of the American Society held 
•at Philadelphia for promoting useful knowledge and to pur- 
sue the ends for which the same was founded; we will be 
present at the meetings of the Society as often as conven- 
iently we can, and will observe the Statutes and 'orders of the 
said Society, provided that whenever any shall signify to the 
President -under his hand, that he desires to withdraw from 
the Society, he shall he free from this Obligation. 













S 



fyV?77JJ Sbf'p-i/' 



t/072. 



4 V^ £/ 




CL. 4^ 



VMmiM i 



12 



The American Soeh'ty hid at JVt/W.tyAw. 






M 



^^^m-ew^/ 



^5 






^ 



h?f777/£ 



1 J 



?r 



'Sdm/M 










• 



■ 






The American Sockt>j hid at Philadelphia. 
Z /^$ Q // / 



13 







r. 























14 



Hie Aiiicn.rGi) SjcU/tf held at PhlUtddphia, 



id? 












yLJ?J7j 









/ 




The Amcr^n Soekij hdd at Ph9.aMphia. 



15 



4^ &> ^-/ 




y 




/ 




£>Ls 



<S*% ^* i ff m t up * 



-'Jftt/: /promt 

S~r . > -k l . ,S / — . r . Z v ^ — \ s . > 



t^. 







»//^ 



'/? 




16 



The American Society held at Philadelphia. 



0^w-^>v. 



&&tr^? 




• ~»»#-.rE«r.*;T .,_ ■-<^Zy~ZCA&tt*sr3*.rz?jj*-<.s . ^. 



Zc&<r€&* i^^k. 




// — -z — ! 



7 









"Old Mother Cumberland." 17 



"OLD MOTHER CUMbEPLA^P." 

BY 'GEOKGE 0. SEILIIAMER, JESQ. 

[A paper read before the Kittocbtiuny Historical Society, at Chatn- 
bersbur£\ Pennsylvania.] 

. . 1 

Ix the march of civilization westward from the Delaware 

the Indian trader was always in the van. First among the 
Indian traders who penetrated the wilderness in advance of 
the pioneer were three Frenchmen, — Pierre Bizailon, Martin 
Chattier, and Jacques Le Tort. At IIlc beginning of the 
eighteenth eenturv these Frenchmen were ohiects of snspi- 
cion. They were harassed in their trade, "being often fined 
for alleged irregularities in their importations, and some- 
times sent to jail on frivolous charges. But within a year 
or two of his arrival in the province tliey found a friend in 
James Logan. From the outset Logan saw how they might 
he made useful to the Proprietary, and he used and rewarded 
them. .All of them were granted plantations on the Sus- 
quehanna, — Bizailon among the Indians of Peshtang, Char- 
tier at Turkey Hill, near the Conestoga reservation, and 
Le Tort in Donegal, above Shawneetown. The only one of 
these to establish a trading-post in the Cumberland Valley 
was Le Tort, who built a cabin at Ik-aver Pond, near Car- 
lisle, as early as 1720. 

As the first white man to obtain a foothold in the valley, 
Jacques Le Tort becomes an object of interest for all of us. 
Unfortunately, nobody ever took the trouble to write his 
biography, and such allusions as the colonial annals contain 
relating to his personal and domestic affairs tell us more of 
the traits and characteristics; of his wife, Ann Le Tort, than 
of the busy trader upon whom Logan depended for bis 
knowledge of the vast region west of the Susquehanna. 
Madame Le Tort was a woman of intrepid spirit., and some- 

VOL. XXIV. — 2 



18 



"Old Holler Cumberland." 



tliinu* of. a shrew withal. She seems to have remained at 
home and kept liou.se while Jacques traded with the Indians. 
At a very early period, while she still lived on the Schuyl- 
kill, she was accused of threatening the Province with the 
vengeance of the French and the Indians of the upper Dela- 
ware. She showed that the only foundation for the accusa- 
tion was the vigor with which she used her hroomhandlc 
upon the accusers. After she removed to the Susquehanna 
the Indians in the neighborhood complained that she turned 
them' out of her house, and that her hogs despoiled their 
corn. She answered vigorously that her house was her 
own, and the grievance concerning the rooters was smoothed 
over by the oleaginous Logan. These Indians were Shaw- 
anese, and it was probably owing to the madam's temper 
that Le Tort's first cabin at Beaver Pond was. destroyed by 
these treacherous nomads. How many. years Le Tort re- 
mained on the spring that now hears his name it is impossi- 
ble to say, but we know that before the wave of emigration 
began to ilow up the Cumberland Yalley in any considerable 
volume he had already established his trading-post on the 
Allegheny. 

At the time that Le Tort had his cabin at Leaver Pond 
the Shawanese were very uneasy. They were alien Indians 
on the Susquehanna, and at no time were they on terms of 
perfect amity with the white settlers. They were Ishmael- 
ites among the native races, and never for long had a per- 
manent settlement anywhere. They came among the Sus- 
quehanna Indians as refugees from the South, but proved 
troublesome from the outset. Their young men joined the 
hostile hands from the Five Xations in their incursions into 
Virginia, and when rebuked for their conduct the whole 
nation manifested a -pint of discontent that finally made the 
Shawanese the most relentless enemies of the Province. 
They forsook their towns on the Susquehanna and emigrated 
to the Allegheny, inducing many at' the Pelawaivs to go 
with them. Fearing that they would become the catspaws 
of the French, as afterwards happened, the provincial authori- 



; ; 



. 



"Old Mother Cumberland" 19 

tics sought to bring them back to the west side of the Sus- 
quehanna, and the whole of fna Cumberland Valley was 
allotted to them as a hunting-ground, but in terms so vague 
that the so-called Manor of Lowther 1 might comprise only a 
few miles of territory bet ween the Conodoguinet and Yellow 
Breeches, or begin at the river and end nowhere. 

Vagueness was the vitiating quality of nearly all the Penn 
deeds and Proprietary grants. In almost every case the 
Proprietary promises had a string to theim They were 
often intended to seem to mean more than they meant. 
The survey of the Lowthcr Manor was a case in point. In 
the autumn of 1731 John "Wright, Tobias Hendricks, and 
Samuel Blunston, all leading men of Lancaster County in 
the Proprietary interest, 2 wore directed by the Commissioners 
of Property and the Governor to lay out the lower end of 
the valley ostensibly as a reservation for the Shawanesc, but 
in reality jis a Proprietary manor. At this time Peter Char- 
tier, the half-breed son of old Martin, who, like his father, 
had married a Shawanese squaw, was living in the Indian 
village on the west side of the river, at what is now the site 
of New Cumberland. Young Peter was in the pay of the 
Proprietary, and was expected to exert a soothing influence 
over the Shawanese, whose attitude was menacing, and to 
induce them to return to the Susquehanna. "When Wright, 
Hendricks, and Blunston arrived at Peshtang they sent 
Chartier a letter announcing the purpose of their coming. 
They were, they said, to lay out a tract oi' land between the 
two creclcs five or six miles back from the river to aeeom- 

1 Adam Hoopes bought! two hundred acres of land on both sides of 
Le Tort's spring from John MeClure, eldest son and devisee of John 
McClure. Hoopes' s patent, dated in 1705, contains the phrase " to be 
liolden of us, our heirs and successors, as of the Manor of Lowthcr in the 
county of Cumberland aforesaid." 

1 Wright and Blunston, who were settled on the site of Columbia on 
the Susquehanna, were Quakers.. They were both justices of the peace 
for Lancaster County. Kkuiafeon issued the licenses that authorised >et- 
tlenunts west of the river before the purchase of 1730. Hendricks was. 
a Presbvterian of Donegal. 



20 "Old Mother OumMrmd." 

modate the Shawaneso, and defend them from encroach- 
ments; and tl icy added that they had orders to dispossess 
all persons settled on that side of the river, M that those 
woods may remain free to ye Indian? for planting and hunt- 
ing." Chartier was asked to convey this information to 
the Indians at " Alleghening." As the Indian title had not 
yet been extinguished west of the Susquehanna, this was a 
promise to the Shawanese of what belonged to the Five 
Nations, and the promise was so worded that the Indians 
were expected to believe that they were to have the whole 
of the Cumberland Valley, while in reality they were re- 
stricted to the narrow strip five or six miles back from the 
river. The Indians refused to return and none of the squat- 
ters was dispossessed, but the whole valley was openly 
treated as a reservation, while the settlers were secretly en- 
couraged to possess themselves of holdings alomr the Cono- 
doguinet and Conococheague from the Susquehanna to the 
Potomac. 

It maybe inferred from the fact that intruders were to be 
expelled from the valley by the agents of the Proprietary in 
.1731 that actual settlement had already begun. A few fami- 
lies claim that their ancestors crossed the Susquehanna as 
early as 172o, and in many cases the date is put not later 
than 1730. I put little faith in mere family tradition, as in 
the cases of the four Chambers brothers, but we have some 
written proofs that are worthy of acceptance. In 1727 
Tobias Hendricks, the younger, wrote from some point in 
the valley to John Harris, at •Pcshtatn* enclosing a letter for 
his father, Tobias Hendricks, of Donegal, one of the three 
men who laid out Lowther Manor, in whieh he spoke of 
" the grate numbers coming this side of ye Sasquehanna." 
It is likely that at that time voting Hendricks was in the 
Indian trade, for he also spoke of haying skins from a trader 
at the Potomac. His brother Jo\in had charge of the 
Springettsbury Manor, opposite Columbia, where he owned 
a plantation. Tobias was given charge o[^ the Lowther 
Manor. He settled at Oyster Point, where he kept a tavern 



"Old Mother Cumberland." 21 

i 

at a later period. His son William was enplain of one of 
the two companies that went from the Cumberland Valley 
in 1775 to assist in the leaguer of Boston, and he was the 
first officer from Pennsylvania to fall in the Revolution. 

The only documentary evidence of actual settlement in 
the valley prior to 1730 of which I have knowledge was in 
the case of Andrew Ralston, of Big Spring-. 1 Ealston ob- 
tained a qualified Blunston warrant for two hundred acres 
of land, January 14, 1737. In his application for the war- 
rant in 173G he said it was for a tract on which he had lived 
" for ye past eight years.'' This would make the year of his 
settlement 1728. The Ralston warrant contained a phrase 
that disturbs the tradition in regard to the four Chambers 
brothers. His land was described as situated " on the Great 
Spring, a branch of Conodogwainet, joyning to the Upper 
Side of a Tract granted to Randel Chambers, for the use of 
his son James Chambers." An eminent jurist of this valley 
is fond of relating a story, originally told by one of the lay 
judges who helped to give dignity to the court over which 
one of his predecessors presided, concerning a member of 
the bar who had previously been a preacher. In a sermon 
on the Prodigal Son the preacher said, " AVe know all about 
the prodigal, and about his father, and about his dissatisfied 
brother, and about the fatted calf, but we know nothing 
about the mother. Where was the mother? My brethren, 
I have thought long and seriously over the silence of Scrip- 
ture in regard to the mother, and have" been able io reach 
no other conclusion than that she was in the kitchen cook- 
ing the calf." Wc know something about the four Cham- 
bers brothers, and the three plantation's at the three springs, 
— Big Spring, Middle Spring, and Falling Spring, — but we 
know nothing about the father. Where was the lather ? If 

1 J. McAllister Ralston, of Mcchanicsljurjr, has in his possesion the 
original warrant. I have soon similar claim- in behalf of Richnrt] Parker 
and Archibald McAllister that would place the date of their settlement 
even earlier, but I regard these claims as traditionary. There may, 
however, be documentary proof to sustain them. 



00 



"Old Mother CumkrltmfU' 



the description in the Kahston warrant was correct, lie must 
have been on his plantation in Taxton fattening the calf for 
James, if not for Robert rmcl Benjamin. 1 

It is clear from IlendfieTcs's letter to Karris and from the 
Ralston claim, as well as from the averments of the letter to 
Chartier, that settlers began, to pick out. plantations west of 
the Susquehanna before 1730; but my own impression is 
that the wave of emigration djcl not obtain a steady flow be- 
fore 1733. In that year Shinpensbnrg, the oldest town in 
the valley, began its existence. 2 " "We have eighteen cabhins 
hilt here now, and it looks a town, but we have no name 
for it," James Magaw wrote to his brother John, May 21, 
1733. Four years later Edward Shippen, of Lancaster, ob- 
tained a patent for the land on which the town was situated, 
and imposed upon it his quit-rents and his name. From 
that time the settlement of the valley was rapid and almost 
simultaneous. 

We have no way of measuring the increase in population 
and the material prosperity of the settlements except by 
events that we know arc historical. We can infer, for ex- 
ample, that the valley had become politically important in 
1735 from the fact that in that year it was divided into two 
townships, — Fennsborough and Hopewell. The dividing 
line was at the Big Spring. In that year also the first road 
was laid out from the Susquehanna towards the Potomac. 

1 The names Handle, Ronald, and Rowland Chambers arc of frequent 
occurrence in the early record-. Randle v.; 1 -. one of the viewers to lay 
out a road from Donegal Meeting-House to Lancaster in 1732. The name 
also occurs among tbe taxable* of .Mil ford Town-hip, Juniata County, 
1700-03. Ronald died December '2 1, 1740, and was buried in Meeting- 
House Springs graveyard. Rowland was an Indian trader, and kept the 
ferry three miles below Harris's, afterwards Simpson's. James Chambers 
was still a taxable In Hopewell in. 1702. There is no trace of his sons, 
if he had any, in the devolution. A James Chambers obtained a war- 
rant for land at Thonipsohtowh, Juniata County, in L7.">.">. The occur- 
rence of the names of James and Handle in the Juniata Valley is sug- 
gestive, but proves nothing. 

'Some writers make the date 1730. 



I 

■ 






"Old Mother Cumberland." 23 

Tlic report of the viewers, which was made February 3, 
1736, was unsatisfactory to many of the inhabitants, — to 

those of the lower end of the valley because its course was 
almost as sinuous as that of the Conodoguinet, and to those 
along the North Mountain, above the Big Spring, because it 
passed through the Oakville Barrens to Shippensburg, in- 
stead of following the course of the creek to Middle Spring. 
Reviewers were appointed, and they reported, May 4, 1736, 
making many alterations below but none above the Big 
Spring. The inhabitants of Middle Spring held an indig- 
nation meeting at the tavern of the Widow riper in Ship- 
pensburg in the spring of 1736, but the reviewers failed to 
see why they should straighten the course of the road below 
Newville and twist it above. Li 173G the provincial tax- 
collectors made their first appearance among the inhabitants 
of the valley. The fact that most of the early settlers were 
Scotch-Irish has been emphasized by every writer who 
treated the subject, but Jacob Snebly, or Snivel v, an honest 
Swiss, who lived near Shady Grove, in Franklin County, was 
a tax-collector for the south part of Hopewell as early as 
1739, Antrim Township, embracing the whole of what is 
now Franklin County, was detached from Hopewell in 1741, 
and Lurgan was carved out of Antrim in 1743. Penns- 
horough Township was not divided into East and "West 
Pennsborough until 1745. The last of the Lancaster County 
townships to be created was Peters. 1 Pupp fixes the number 
of taxables in the valley in 1743 at about eight hundred, 
and the population as rising three thousand. 

A better method of measuring the influx of immigrants 

'This statement occasioned some discussion, as the date usually given 
is 1751. As a matter of fact, there is no known record of the creation 
of either Lurgan or JYters Township. In the case of Peters, the proof 
is stronger that it was created before 17o0 than in 1751. It has always 
been customary t<> credit David McCoy, one of the commissioners to 
settle the hounds of the new county, and William Maxwell, one of the 
first justice's, to Peters, and Henj&min Chambers, who filled l»<»th posi- 
tions, to Antrim. This seems to me conclusive of the existence of 
Teters Township at the time of the erection of the county. 



L 



24 "0$d M&tlter Gwriberteind" 

and the clfaracter and condition of fliQ settlers than these 
references to the political history of the valley will be found 
in a study of the early churches. Wherever there were 
Presbyterians there was sure to he a church, and wherever 
there was a church there was pretty sure to he what James 
Magaw would have called " a good wheen" of Presbyterians. 
It is an interesting fact that the live earliest Presbyterian 
churches of the Cumberland Valley — those of Silvers's 
Spring, Meeting-House Springs, Big Spring, Middle Spring, 
and Falling Spring — date their actual history from 1737-38. 
The two Pennsborough churches claim an earlier origin, 
placing their beginnings as early as 1734. Although priority 
is often asserted for the church at Silvers\s Spring, 1 am in- 
clined to accord it to the Meeting-House Springs Church. 
It seems to he clear that (he fust church edifice in the valley 
was built on the bluif, on the south side of the Conodoguinet, 
near the head of the beautiful stream to which this early 
meeting-house gave the name of Meeting-House Springs. 
It was a wooden structure, situated about two miles north- 
west of Carlisle. It was erected as early as 1736. Xo 
vestige of the building remains, and onlv the old graveyard. 
with its neglected tombs, tells of the pioneers who wor- 
shipped within its walls. 

The first preaching in the Cumhcrland Valley was in 1734. 
As a part of Lancaster County, " the people of Conodoguinet" 
were under the care of the 1'reshytery of Donegal, organ- 
ized in 1732. On Octoher 16, 1784, it was "ordered that 
Alexander Craighead supply over the river two or three Sab- 
baths in Xovember." It is not known where he preached, but 
it is probable that lie ministered both at Silvers's Spring and 
Meeting-House Springs. Craighead had beeti licensed by 
the Presbytery only eight days before. The next supply, in 
April, 1735, scorns to have been the Rev. William Bertram, 
who was then settled at Paxton ami DerrV. In the autumn 
the Rev. Samuel Gelstun, who had a varied career in Xciv 
York and Pennsylvania, was directed by the Donegal l'res- 
bvtery to visit the Presbyterians on the Conodoguinet. The 






"Old Mother Cumberland:* 25 

next year, 1736, the Bev. Thomas. Craig head, the father of 
Alexander, 1 Was sent to the two congregations of Pcnns- 
borough, — Silvers's Spring and Meeting-llouse Springs. 
The Craigheads were a family of clergymen, and were iden- 
tified with the valley churches during the rest of the century. 
When he came over the rivev, Thomas Craighead was already 
an old man, and was reverently spoken of by his associates 
in the Presbytery as <; Father" Craighead. This visit led to 
a call from the Presbyterian congregation that was organ- 
izing at Pig Spring. There was opposition to the new 
church from the older congregations at Meeting-House 
Springs and Silvers's Spring, but the Presbytery determined 
to authorize the charge, and " Father" Craighead accepted 
the call in 1737. This year the older congregations obtained 
a preacher that finally became their pastor. He was the 
Pew Samuel Thomson, a licentiate of the Newcastle Presby- 
tery: It is a curious illustration of the eagerness of the 
pioneer churches of the valley to secure pastors in despite 
of the older congregations that Falling Spring attempted 
to obtain Mr. Thomson in 17-38, as Big Spring obtained 
"Father" Craighead in 17-37. The application of Benjamin 
Chambers and Thomas Brown on behalf ot the people of 
Conococheague was not acceded to, and in 17-30 .Mr. Thom- 
son was ordained and installed pastor of the two Penns- 
borongh churches. In 1745 he was released from the charge 
at Silvers's Spring u on account of bodily weakness," al- 
though directed kt to be generous and industrious in preach- 
ing there, according to his conscience and their necessity." 
lie lived in the parsonage at Meeting-! louse Springs, and 
cultivated the globe lands. His wife died there in 17-1-1, and 
was buried in the old graveyaul. Silvers's Spring Church 
was named alter Silvers's Spring, which entered the Conodo- 
guinet near the site of the .meeting-house, and the spring 
was named after James Silvers, who was one of the earliest 
settlers in what is now Silver Spring Township. 

"Father" Craighead's call in 17o7 was made for lTopc- 
1 Thc authorities are con Hiding in regard to this >iatenu-nt. 



26 "Old Mother Otmbaiand." 






veil, not simply for Pig Spring", and. as it was presented to 
the Donegal Presbyter* by Robert Henry, it is not unlikely 

that Middle Spring was included in the application. Henry 

was an elder at Middle Spring. One of the causes of the 
opposition to Craighead'* installation, voiced by Anderson, 
the pastor in Donegal, and Thomson, of Pennsborougli, was 
the venerable divine's family troubles. For some reason 
Craiirhcad's wife and his son John refused' to live in the 
same house with him at Pcquea. lie suspended his wife 
from the communion, and declined giving his reason for it. 
The suspension occurred in the winter of 1735-3G, and com- 
plaint was made to the Donegal Presbytery in April, 17 30. 
An investigation was made in May, the charge being that . 
the suspension was without the privity of the session. 
" Father" Craiirhcad's answer was that, the reason being 
known only to himself, the session was not competent to 
advise, and that there was no time for consultation, as he 
had not resolved on the suspension until the Saturday night 
before the sacrament. The Presbytery indeed that he was 
laboring under a delusion, or delirium of the head, and 
directed him to restore Mrs. Craighead to church privileges, 
and not to insist that his wife and son should live under the. 
same roof with him. As he was unyielding, his dismissal 
from Pequea followed, September 7, 1 73G-, and barred his 
way to the acceptance of the call from Hopewell in 1737. 
Through Mrs. Craighead's representations to the Presbytery 
that she had no cause of complaint against her husband, the 
trouble was smoothed over in J73S,and the people of Hope- 
well were authorized to build a .church at Great Spring. 
The Pew Alexander Craighead was directed to install his 
father. The family dissensions do not seem to have been 
entirely healed, for Alexander, who was as inflexible as his 
parent, failed to accept the duty, and the service was per- 
formed by Pcrtram in October, 1 738. In the mean time, it 
is probable, the iirst church edifice at Big Spring had been 
erected. Like all the early churches in the valley, it was 
built of logs. It stood in the western part oC the graveyard. 



"Old Mother Ctuabcrbmdr 27 

and was occupied until 1790, when the present stone edifice 
was erected. "Father" Craighead's pastorate lasted only 
six months, as his death occurred in the pulpit while pro- 
nouncing the benediction in April, 1739. His grave in the 
Big Spring graveyard is without a tablet, hut it is said he 
was huried where the church now stands. 

The "beginning of Middle Spring Church as an organiza- 
tion is involved in some obscurity. Its historians date its 
startfrom 1738, because "Father" Craighead became pastor 
at Big Spring in that year, claiming him as the pastor of 
both conicrejrations. It is not unlikely that he preached at 
Middle Spring while the questions relating to his call to Big 
Spring were pending before the Presbytery, and, perhaps, 
occasionally during the winter of 1738—39; but the history 
of Middle Spring Chrueh cannot be said to begin until 1742, 
when the Rev. John Blair was called to the pastorate at the 
Three Springs, — Big, Middle, and Rocky. In the mean 
time, 1739-41, the Rev. Mr. Calls, of Ireland, and the Rev. 
Mr. Clarke, of Scotland, arc named as preaching at Middle 
Spring. It has been assumed that the first church edifice — a 
log structure thirty-five feet square — was built in 173S, but 
there is no proof that the building was erected until the set- 
tlement of Mr. Blair. It is not unlikely, however, that the 
place was selected as a convenient locality for a meeting- 
house a number of years before the church was built. Meet- 
ings in the woods and in tents were not unusual at the period 
of the settlement of the Cumberland Valley. Indeed, there 
is a tradition in the Johnston family that John Johnston, the 
settler, was accustomed to ride from his house, three and a 
half miles above Shippensburg, with Ids wife behind him, to 
Middle Spring to attend preaching in the woods before there 
was achureh there. After the little church — not larger than 
one of the log schoohhouses that became so common in Liter 
years — was built, Mr. Blair preached in it to a people scarcely 
less noteworthy than their pastor, lie ca-me as the rcpre* 
senlative of the new and ardent element in the Presbyterian 
Church that was the result oi the preaching of George 






28 "Old Mother Cambrland.". 

WhiteiieM and tlic revolutionary policy of tlic Tennents 
and ilicir fiery followers in the New Brunswick Presbytery. 
The way had been paved for hira by the visits of Campbell 
and Rowland in 1741- and he was received by congregations 
fully in accord with the movement of which he was to be- 
come the exponent in the Cumberland Valley. lie was 
ordained pastor of the Three Springs December L'7, 1742, 
the ceremony taking place at Middle Spring. This is proved 
by an entry m the sessional records, which is still preserved. 
During Mr. Blair's pastorate of fifteen years Middle Spring 
was his place of residence and the centre of his activity. 

The eagerness to invest Poekv Spring Church with great 
antiquity, manifested in recent years, has not resulted in giv- 
ing it priority over Falling Spring, or in demonstrating that 
it was more than an adjunct of .Middle Spring before 17G3. 
•That there was a controversy with the people of Conoco- 
cheague at a very early period is clear. The Hopewell 
charge — Big Spring and Middle Spring — manifested at the 
outset a determined opposition to the erection of a church 
at Falling Spring. Robert Henry going to the meeting of 
the Donegal Presbyter}', in 1738, to complain that Falling 
Spring was about to encroach upon Hopewell. Henry was 
6o strenuous in his opposition to the pretensions of Falling 
Spring that he got into trouble with the Presbytery in con- 
sequence of his zeal. That, the people for whom Pocky 
Spring was a convenient point for a meeting-house were with 
him in his contentions was a fact due as much to affinity 
with Middle Spring as to the superior claims of Rocky 
Spring. The two congregations were in fact one people, 
allied by close family ties. Put, apart from these considera- 
tions, the controversy finally turned upon a question that 
made Pocky Spring essential to Middle Spring and Pig 
Spring. When Mr. Blair was called by these churches in 
1712, the call was made to the Newcastle New Side Pres- 
bytery. The contentions now concerned not so much the 
encroachments of Fulling Spring upon Hopewell- as the ex- 
tension of the bounds of the new Presbytery ot Newcastle • 



"Old Mother Cumberland." .29 • 

i 

in the territory of the old Presbvtcry of Donegal. Meeting- 

House Springs and Silvers's Spring adhered to ilie Old Side 
Presbytery, while Big Spring and Middle Spring repudiated 
its authority. The Rev. Samuel Caven, the pastor at Cono- 
cocheague, was in sympathy with the Old Side. The people 
of Moss Spring, Greencastle, were of the same way of 
thinking, while those of Falling Spring, Chambersburg, 
were Xew Side. This enabled the Xew Side Presbyterians 
of Lettcrkenny and Hamilton to divert those of Falling 
Spring to Eocky Spring. Accordingly, Mr. .Blair's authority 
was extended from mountain to mountain, and as far east- 
ward from Big Spring and as far westward from Middle 
Spring as was possible. The three congregations were made 
parts of one charge, and Mr. Blair's labors were divided 
equally between them, as the session-book of Middle Spring 
shows. The first Rocky Spring ehureh was built about this 
time, not as early as 1738, as has been claimed. 

In 1739 there was a supplication to the Donegal Presby- 
tery for authority to build a church at Rocky Spring, but it 
was ordered that "the house for public worship be erected 
as near to the Falling Spring as conveniently may be." That 
it was erected at the Falling Spring the events that followed 
seem to prove. Disappointed in securing the services of 
Thomson in 1788, the Conococheague churches were com- 
pelled to content themselves with Caven. The records of 
the Donegal Presbytery distinctly show that when a supplica- 
tion was made in 1739 that Mr. Caven's ordination be has- 
tened, it was expressly declared that there was to be a meet- 
ing-house at Falling Spring. "When Pocky Spring is next 
heard from it no longer acknowledges Donegal, but marches 
under the banner of Newcastle. That the Falling Spring 
and Pocky Spring Churches were built simultaneously is 
highly improbable; that the Falling Spring Church was 
built in 1739 in the romantic cedar grovo where the present 
church stands need not be doubted. Tradition has given 
us a very full description of this primitive structure. It was 
built of logs, and was entered by doors on the eastern and 



30 "Old Mother Cumberland^ 

southern sides. The windows were long and narrow, reach- \ 

ing from one end of the building to the other. Caven's 

pastorate was brief, lasting only two years, 1730—11. In 

1741 a part of the congregation accused him of immorality, 

and it was shown that ho spoke of his sacred office as a 

trade, and talked of his IJ running to drive the devil." Ilia 

dismissal, which followed, was granted at his own request. 

After that the Falling Spring Church was without a history 

until 17G7. 

It docs not follow that Caven's dismissal from Palling 
Spring was immediately followed by his withdrawal from 
East Conococlieague, a^ the congregation at Moss Spring was 
called. The Moss Spring Church, known in local annals as 
the "Old Red Meeting-ltouse," remained faithful to the Old 
Side, to which the pastor adhered. The relation, however, 
could have lasted only a short time, for he accepted a call to 
Silvers's Spring as the successor of Thomson in 17-15, and 
died there, November 0, 1750, aged forty-nine years. Subse- 
quently East and West Conococlieague were united, but this 
was not effected until 175 1, when the Rev. John Steel, who 
had adhered to the Old Side, and who was an Indian tighter 
as well as preacher, became, the pastor of the two churches. 
The Upper church was on Church Hill, near Mereersburg, 
called in colonial annals, Mr. Steel's Meeting-House. 

The establishment of these seven churches at the seven 
springs within ten years of the beginning of the settlement 
of the valley shows that the pioneers, who had spread them- 
selves from the Susqueh-mna almost to the Potomac, pos- 
sessed a remarkable genius for organization. TTith such a 
people the reasons that influenced them to demand the cre- 
ation of a new county only twenty years after the erection 
of the county of Lancaster arc not far to seek. It was a 
long journey to the county-seat at Hiekorytowii. Thieves, 
rascals, and disorderly persons made the valley and the adja- 
cent mountains a secure retreat from pursuit by the officers 
of the law. Lancaster County was German and Quaker, — 
that is, Quaker in rule through affiliation with the Menuon- 



"Old Mother Oumbertefld." 31 

itcs,— except in the upper fcoaviiships of Donegal raid Deny. 
In the Cumberland Valley the population was homogeneous. 
The people was almost wholly Presbyterian. "Witty the in- 
dependent spirit of Presbyterians they were eager for home 
rule. The demand for a new county was most strenuously 
urged in the upper part of the valley, — in the townships of 
Hopewell, Lurgan, Antrim, and rotors, — all intensely Irish, 
or Scotch-Irish, as it is now the fashion to call the descend- 
ants of the pioneers. 

Petitions from the inhabitants of the North or Cumber- 
land Valley for a new county were presented to the Assembly 
in 1749, and the act creating it was passed January 27, 1750. 
The commissioners named to carry the act into effect were 
David McCoy, of Peters, Benjamin Chambers, of Antrim, 
David Magaw, of Hopewell, and James McJntire and John 
McCormick, of East Pennsborough. These appointments, in 
a territorial some, were adjusted with great nicety, two of- the 
commissioners belonging to the lower, one to the central, 
and two to the upper part of the valley. The new county 
was the sixth organized in Pennsylvania, and it embraced 
the entire region west of the Susquehanna, except the terri- 
tory that comprises the counties of York and Adams. There 
was a boundary dispute with York County that the commis- 
sioners of the two counties failed to adjust, but which was 
finally settled by the Assembly, Februnry 8, 1751. 

The great question pending the erection of the county 
was the choice of a county-seat. Five places were visited by 
Thomas Cookson, a deputy surveyor of the Province, more 
than a year before the act creating the county was passed, 
and in his report, dated March 1, 1749, he described four 
sites, each of which he said had advocates. — the Manor, Le 
Tort'3 Spring, Big Spring, and Conocoeheague. Shippcns- 
burg, then the only town in the valley, lie curtly dismissed 
as unsuitable, because of the Shippcn grant and the warn of 
water. 1 L; regard to the Sfanor, at the extreme lower end 

1 This fc'aa manifestly a sn:'.j> judgment It was believed that the 
Proprietary interest require*! the selection of L e Tort's Spring, mil it was 



82 



"Old Mother Cumberland;' 



of the valley, lie said that the great body of the people were 
loudly against its selection, as lying in a distant corner of the 
county. The principal advantage of Le Tort's Spring was 
that it was convenient to the new path to Allegheny, being 
only four miles from the Gap. Of Big Spring he said it 
was five miles from Running's and seven from Shippenshurg. 
In both cases he must have included a " bittock," as the Scotch 
say. lie did not overlook the fact that the Proprietary had 
four thousand acres of land on the north side of Conodoguinet, 
opposite the spring. lie pointed out what seems to have 
been the most important point in locating the county-seat, 
— that the road to Allegheny could be brought through a 
gap called MeChuv's Gap. He favored either Le Tort's or 
Big Spring, but he said, the situation of Conococheague, 
where the road crossed the stream, was very stood. He rives 
us an intimation' of what were Colonel Chambers's arguments 
for its selection, — that it was the most conveniently situated 
for the Indian trade, and opened a shorter and better passage 
through the mountains. As we all know, Le Tort's Spring 
— that is, Carlisle — was chosen. There was not a house in 
the neighborhood' at the time, and the county-seat had only 
five buildings in 1753. 

Let us endeavor in imagination to follow in Cooksoirs 
footsteps, and to see with our mental .vision what he saw 
with his eyes. In our journey we will use the modern no- 
menclature, so that we may know " where we are at." Our 
starting-} joint is Tohias Hendricks's tavern, at Oyster Point, 
on the Manor, where his son William is at play.' A quarter 
of a century later this boy fell in the unsuccessful attack upon 
Quebec, and was buried in the same plat with the gallant 
General Montgomery. From Hendricks's we take the pub- 
lic road, laid out in 1736; to the house of James Silvers, 
where we can look about us. Silvers came " over the river" 



chosen by the Governor in defiance of the wi-hes of the majority of the 
people of the valley. Hat I Shippenshurg been made the county-seat, 
there is no reason t<> doubt that Cumberland County would still eom^rUe 
the whole of the Cumberland Valtcv, 



"Old Mother GimMand," S3 

about 1730, and took up lands in what is Silver Spring 
Township. His plantation, '.which comprised, five hundred 
and twenty-five acres, was in one of the loops of the Oono- 

doguinet, nowhere more remarkable for its serpentine course < 

than between Silver Spring, as it is now called, and the Sns- i 

quehanna. This spring rises from a large fountain about a 
mile north of the creek. If we stroll along its banks we 
shall come to the mill built by James Pollock at the conflu- 
ence of the two streams. "Whether we shall find Pollock at 
the mill is more than I can say, and for his neighbor, Rob- 
ert Buchanan, we shall have to look farther up the Conodo- 
guinet, for he has already sold his lands on the creek, at the 
mouth of the spring, to George Croghan, the celebrated 
Indian agent. Crosrhan is probably at home, for he has just 
bought the lands adjacent, settled by William Walker, from 
William Trent. "Walker was a captain under Marlborough 
in Queen Anne's wars, and was the greai-STeat-gTandfafhcr 
of Robert J. Walker, Secretary of the Treasury in Polk's 
Cabinet and Governor of Kansas under Buchanan. He was 
killed by the Indians at McCormick's Fort in 1757. Trent's 
Gap, Mount Holly, was called after William Trent. Trent 
and Silvers were both active in promoting the organization 
of the county, and were prominent in the atfairs of the val- 
ley, but neither left descendants here to perpetuate his name. 
Before 1750 there were a dozen farmers on the Oouodogui- 
net almost within sight of Pollock's mill. 

Prom the house of James Silvers the next stage in our 
journey is to the house of John Iloge. Hoge is on his 
death-bed, and Ilogestown does not yet exist. The dwell- 
ing-house was not on the site of the village. ] loge's Run 
ri>es on what was the Iloge tract and empties into the Cono- 
doguinet. John Iloge was born at Perth A mboy, Xew Jer- 
sey, and settled in Lancaster County before becoming a 
Cumberland Valley pioneer. His wife was Gwenthlene 
Bowemwho claimed to belong to the royal family of Wales, 
and retained her maiden name after her marriage as due to 
her royal birth. A better reason, perhaps, wa* that the 
von. xxiv. — 3 



34 



"Old Mother CambirkuuV'. 



Huge name was generally pronounced Hogg. They had two 
sons, — David and Jonathan. David was sheriff of Cumber- 
land County, 1708-71, and Jonathan was a member of the 
Pennsylvania Convention of 177G, and of the Council of 

Safety and the Supreme "Executive Council. Other descend- 
ants of John Hoge were distinguished as soldiers in the 
Involution and as ministers in the Presbyterian Church. 

Before reaching Hoire's we passed the farm of Thomas 
McCormick, which was northeast of the village, lie was 
the ancestor of the McCormick family still represented in 
Silver Spring Township. J lis son John was one of the com- 
missioners to settle the boundaries of the new county and a 
trustee to buy the ground for a court-house. Cyrus II. Mc- 
Cormick, the millionaire inventor of Chicago, was of this 
family. As your guide lias not learned the place of resi- 
dence of James Mclntire, John McCormiek's colleague from 
East Pennsborough on the County Commission, we shall not 
visit him on this trip. As we proceed on our journey we 
pass the house of John Oliver on the ridge west of Iloges- 
town. lie was the ancestor of Isabella Oliver, the first poet 
of the Cumberland Valley. She celebrated a number of 
localities on the Conodoguinet in verse. Among her poems 
was one on the poisoning of the whole family of John Ca- 
rothers by a jealous servant, Sallie Clark. Carotbers was 
settled at the mouth of IIoge ? s Run. His son John became 
prominent in the affairs, of the county; was county lieuten- 
ant in 1777, and sheriff and a member of the Assembly 
afterwards. Another son. Andrew Carothers, who was always 
a cripple in consequence of the poisoning, became a distin- 
guished lawyer in Carlisle. "We are now in a thickly popu- 
lated neighborhood, hut we cannot stop to recount the virtues 
of. the Armstrongs, 1 ruins, Mitchells, Clendcunins, and the 
other Presbyterian lathers who worshipped in the sanctuary 
at Silvers'.- Spring. I regret this all the more because 
Archibald Irwin, son of dames, one of four pioneer brothers, 
was an ancestor oi % Governor Francis ){. Shunk and Presi- 
dent Benjamin Harrison. 



V 7(^807 



"Old 'Mother Cumberland r ." 35 

At New Kingston, or what was to be the site of Xew 
Kingston, we shall iind Joseph Junkin. Junkin was a 
Covenanter wlio would not sit under the ministrations of 
Thomson or Caven, hut worshipped in the celebrated "Jim- 
kin tent" which stood on bis land. lie buik a stone house 
that is still standing. His son Joseph was in the battle of 
Prandywine, and was wounded at the A\ nite Horse in Ches- 
ter County. One of his grandsons was the Rev. Dr. George 
Junkin, an eminent Presbyterian divine, and Judge Benja : 
min Junkin, of Perry County, is one of his descendants. 
One of Joseph Junkin's Covenanter neighbors was Robert 
Bell, whose son Samuel had a thrilling battle with three 
Indians on Shearman's Creek, in which lie killed all of his 
red foes. 

I would like to carry you backward from New Kingston 
for a visit to Samuel Lamb, the stone-mason, famous for his ] 

chimneys, of whom it was said " he plumbed his corners 
with spittle," — that is, he would spit down the corner to see 
if it was plumb, — and Ids patriotic daughter Peggy, who 
said to one of her brothers during the Revolution, " Go] and 
sooner come home a corpse than a coward;" and to the 
vigorous James Galbraith, whose son Andrew was major of 
Culonel "Watts's battalion in 1770, and was captured at Fort 
"Washington. James Galhraith's wife was a daughter of 
Bertram, the pastor at Perry. Their descendants are .-till 
represented in many of the prominent families of the valley. 
From Galhraith's it would be pleasant to go to the mill huilt 
by the Rev. Richard Peters, the speculative secretary of the 
Province, and from there to make an excursion along the 
Yellow Breeches as jar as Craighead's and Mount Jlolly,but 
we must, keep on the high-road to Meeting-] luiise Springs. 
which is as near to the future county-seat as we shall be able 
to find shelter. 

As we stand among the few tombs, some ot % them with 
armorial bearings, in the ntw burial-ground oh the bluff 
above the* Conod^guine!, a delightful panorama unroll.- be- 
fore us. Around us are the lands of John Davis* afterwards 



3G "OW Mather Cumberland." 

colonel of a regiment of Associatora that saw service in the 
Revolution; William Dunbar, collector of taxes for "West 
Pennsborough. who was still living at the close of the een- 
tury; Andrew Forbes, whom some of our early historians 
called Forbush; David Williams, an elder of Meeting-House 
Springs Church; James Blaine, tlie father of Colonel 
Ephraim Blaine, of Revolutionary distinction, and immi- 
grant ancestor of James Gillespie Blaine; Richard Parker, 

the grandfather of Alexander Parker, also a distinguished 

- 

Revolutionary soldier; William Armstrong's " settlement, " 
between the springs and the cave; and Thomas Wilsuii, one 
of the first justices of the county, on the Conodoguinet, 
near the mill-seat where Colonel Blaine built a mill in 1772, 
afterwards Henderson's, but no lunger in existence. East of 
Blaine's mill, or rather mill-seat, is James Smith, by some 
writers believed to have been the signer of the Declaration 
of Independence, and at the mouth of Ee Tort's Spring is 
the mill built by Poland Chamber*, one of the first on the 
Conodoguinet. Jonathan Holmes, a lieutenant in Colonel 
Benjamin Chambers's battalion in 1748, is south of Smith, 
and. Patrick and William Davidson, William Gillingham, 
James Kilgore, Peter Wilkie, and John MeClure are on and 
around the site of Carlisle. It may be that William Thomp- 
son, a captain of horse in the French and Indian War, 
colonel of the First Pennsylvania Battalion of Riflemen in 



i 

I 






1775, and a brigadier-general in 1770, had already built his 
mill on the Conodoguinet, above the primitive church-yard 
where we are taking our survey of the valley. 

It is a striking attribute of our pioneers, wherever we find 
them, that most of them were the ancestors of a distinguished 
posterity. The Blaine example is too familiar to need am- 
plification. Alexander Parker served in the Pennsylvania 
Line throughout the Revolution and rose to the rank of 
major. He afterwards founded the town of Parkcrsbursf, 
West Virginia. Jlis sister Agnes married* William Penny, 
and their son Ebeiiezer was the first mayor ot % Pittsburgh. 
William Armstrong was a brother vt General John Arm- 






"Old Mother CttmHtrlaud." .. 37 

strong, a lieutenant in Colonel -Jbhn Armstrong's battalion 
in 17.55, and a captain in the Kit tanning Expedition in 1764. 
John .Armstrong was one of the founders of Carlisle, and 
the most distinguished of the Cumberland Valley leaders in 

the Indian wars. His son John, author of the famous Xew- 
burg letter in 17S3, was Secretary of War in President 
Madison's Cabinet at the beginning of the War of 1812. 
Through him the Astor family secured a Revolutionary an- 
cestry. Thomas Wilson's son, dames Armstrong Wilson, 
.was a captain in the devolution and an eminent lawyer. 
Roland Chambers was the first BcWor at the village of Mid- 
dlesex. His son John inherited the mill property and 
founded the village. One of Patrick Davidson 's sons, G eorge, 
removed to Kbrth Carolina, and was the father of General 
William Davidson. William B. McClurc, the eminent law- 
yer and jurist of Pittsburgh, was descended from John Me- 
Clure, of Carlisle, and Charles McClure, another descendant, 
was a member of the Legislature in 1835, and Secretary of 
the Commonwealth, 1843-45. Probably no oflicer of the 
Revolution was more intensely American in his environment 
than General Thompson. Not only was his wife a sister of 
George Ross, one of the siirncrs of the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence, but one of her sisters married George Read, an- 
other signer, while one of his sisters became the wife of 
G cor ire Read, the son of the siirner. 

If we were able to make a detour into South Middleton 
Township we should find some families fully as interesting 
as those we have already met. The most noteworthy of 
these are the Moore, Weakley, Craighead, and Denny fami- 
lies. James Moore came from Ireland byway ot^ Maryland 
and took up several thousand aeres of land on the Yellow 
Breeches soon after 1730. His eldest son, William, was 
active with the Cumberland County Associates in the Revo- 
lution, and was Associate Judge in 1800. Another eon, 
John Robert, was with Wayne at Paoli and Washington ul 
Valley Forge. John R. married Xaney, daughter v\ Colonel 
Thomas Johnston, of Greeneastlo, The venerable Johnston 






38 



"Old Mother Cumberland." 



Moore, who lives at " Mooreland," in Carlisle, and is the 
owner of "Bonny Brook," one of the finest trout preserves 
in the State, is their son. James M. Weakley, Professor of 

Pleading in Dickinson Law School, and a State Senator, 
1871-7-1, is a son of the third James Weakley. The first 
James, it is claimed, settled on the. Yellow Breeches as early 
as 1725. The Craiirheads oi Craighead's, who recently held 
a family reunion on the homestead, are descended from 
John, a cousin of the Rev. Thomas Craighead. John was 
the father of the Rev. John Craighead, the celebrated pastor 
at Rocky Spring. William and Walter Denny, brothers, 
came from Chester County in 1745. Walter was a captain 
in Colonel Davis's battalion, and was killed in the affair at 
the Crooked Billet. 1 One of his sons was with the company 
and was captured. Walter was the father of the Rev. David 
Denny, for thirty-eight years pastor .of the Falling Spring 
Church. 

Resuming our journey and passing westward along the 
Iiigh-road, we come to a large tract of land, four miles from 
Carlisle, owned by Archibald McAllister. He was the an- 
cestor of the family of which the late Ward McAllister, the 
leader of the Four Hundred in New York city, was a scion. 
It lias been claimed that he built the second mill west of the 
Susquehanna, on McAllister's Spring. His son Richard was 
the founder of McAllisters '-Town, now Hanover, in York 
County, and lie was colonel of a battalion of York County 
Associators, which he carried io Amboy as part of the 
" Flying Cam])' ? in the summer of 1770. Another son, 
Archibald, was a captain in Colonel Hartley's regiment, 

1 This is asserted in a memoir of Ebenczcr Denny l>y William II. 
Denny, published by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania its an intro- 
duction to Khenezer Denny's " Journal." The statement is questioned 
because Captain Walter Denny's name is retained in the ro.«tcr of the 
Associated Dattalions, May 14, 177\ and in the incomplete roster, May 
11, 1770. As the affair- at the Crooked Pallet occurred May i, 177S, it 
would have been easy to include his name tw<> weeks later, through igno- 
rance of his death. The rtister of 177'.' mvius to be mere guesswork. 
John Jordan was captain of the company in 17^e. 






"Old Mother CumhedaiuL" ■ 39 

Pennsylvania Line; lie acquired the estate that hail be- 
longed to Joseph Chambers, at Fort Hunter, and it is still 
in the possession of his descendants. The. McAllister family 
is scattered all over the country. 

Among "Archv" McAllister's neighbors we must visit 
Robert thinning, who was lieutenant-colonel of Colonel 
Chambers's battalion in the Indian alarm of 1 7 -1 S , and his 
brother Ezekiel, sheriff, 1762-05. Robert was an Indian 
trader, and his trading-post, according to Cookson, was five 
miles from Big Spring. "We shall also visit James MeFar- 
lanc at the " old fort," as the stockade on this tract is called 
in Ins warrant, and, perhaps, look over bis " New Farm" 
adjoining. ' The ; - old fort" was built long before the Indian 
wars, and descended to the Laughlins, who had settled on 
the site of Xewville. One of the grandparents of the pres- 
ent generation of Laughlins was born in the u old fort." 
William McFarlane, a son of dames, was a captain in Colonel 
"Watts's battalion, " Flying Camp," and was captured at Fort 
Washington in 1776. On Mount Rock Spring is the farm 
of John Davidson, which is still in possession of his de- 
scendants. 

Before proceeding farther westward it is only proper that 
we should make a detour through Frankford Township to 
"ye Blue Mountains" to visit Thomas and Bfeanor Butler, 
and their children, " the Fighting Butlers;" and also their 
neighbors, the Gibsons, scarcely less distinguished as soldiers. 
From the latter family came the eminent jurist, John Ban- 
nister Gibson. 

It must have been at the mouth of Big Spring, and not 
at Xewville, that Cookson designed to place the county-scat, 
if this locality was chosen instead of Le Tort's Spring. 
From here, instead of going up by the high-road, through 
the Barrens, to. Shippensburg, we shall follow the Cono- 
doguinet to Maclay's Mill. This region was prolific in In- 
dian lighters and Revolutionary heroes. On the James Jack 
farm near Green Spring, in Newton Township, Fort Carna- 
lian was built. It was the centre of a number of sanguinary 



40 '<M Mr.'hvr Cumhcdtwdr 

conflicts. On th« opposite side of the Conodoguinet was 
the William Carnahau tract, and James Carnahan,a brother 
of William, bought lands on Green Spring. From William 
came the Rev. J. /Y. Carnahan, a pioneer preacher in the 
"West,' and from James the Rev. Dr. Carnahan, President of 
Princeton College. Robert Shannon, of Mifflin Township, 
was the ancestor of Wilson Shannon, of Ohio, Governor of 
Kansas. The Xicholsons on Whiskey Run, even at the time 
of our journey, were extensive slaveholders. This family was 
one of the first to be attacked by the Indians. While the 
men did the fighting the women moulded the bullets and 
loaded the iruns. The Williamsons were another family in the 
neighborhood of Fort Carnahan associated' with the Indian 
massacres, but the story is only traditional. Still other 
families in Mifllin and Hopewell Townships connected with 
Indian history were the Aiders and Bradvs. Joe Amer, 
sometimes identified as Captain Jack, the wild hunter of 
the Juniata, and Samuel Brady, the famous " Captain of the 
Spies" of the Revolutionary .epoch, have both attributes that 
were borrowed by Mcllenry for his novel, " The Spectre of 
the 3 ? orest." We cannot stop to recount their romantic 
histories. 

In Hopewell, near Xewburg, we shall find David Magaw, 
one of the live commissioners to. Fettle the bounds of the 
new county. He was the father of three distinguished sons, 
—Colonel Robert Magaw, in command at Fort Washington 
at the time of its capture; November 16, 1770 ; Dr. William 
^lagav, a practising physician at Mcrcershurg, and surgeon 
of Colonel Thompson's P>atta1ion of Ixifiemen, in 1775; and 
the Pev. Dr. Samuel Magaw, one of the first graduates of 
the College of Philadelphia, and Yice-Provost of the Univer- 
sity oi Pennsylvania. The distinction of the sons is a me- 
morial of the f.thcr. 

Along the North Mountain in Hopewell and Lun*an a 
sojourner at the middle of t\\t*. last century would have heard 
some remarkable stories <^ early settlement. For instance, 
there is a tradition that Thomas Pomorov settled on a largo 









"OLdMotkr Camber!* w*L" 41 

tract on the Box-bury and Nefwburg lioad, two miles from 
Koxbury, about 1780. lie was the ancestor of the Pomcroy3 
of Franklin and Juniata Counties. Although born in Ire- 
land, lie wad of Huguenot extraction. 1 am inclined to be- 
lieve that the year of his settlement has been antedated. 
Again, it is asserted that Joseph MeElwain settled in Three- 
Square Hollow in 1717. J^i sustained this would antedate 
the erection of Le Tort's cabin at Carlisle. It Bounds like 
a three-square story. Furthermore, it has been supposed 
that the Jlerron, Young, and Watt tracts, above Middle 
Spring, in what is now Southampton Township, Franklin 
County, was the first land taken up in the Cumberland Val- 
ley, because they were, it was alleged, previously assigned to 
Benjamin Furley. Furley lived in Holland, and his dealings 
with Teim date back to 1080. The use of his name sounds 
very much like a trick upon the actual settlers. 

And now we are in the heart of the Middle Spring settle- 
ment. Standing on the hill overlooking Maclay's Mill we 

have a glorious vision before us, The winding Conodojnrinet 

. . ... 

glitters in the sunshine from so many points in its tortuous 

course that it seems to be playing "hide and seek" with 
the pine thickets that mingle their resinous breath with the ■ j 

haze that hangs over the stream. The mountains that mark 
the two sides of the valley seem so near that they give the 
impression that they once had a mind to embrace each other, 
and cut the broad vale in two midway between the Susque- 
hanna and the Potomac. At our feet arc the paternal acres 
of the Maelays. The immigrants were two brothers, Charles 
and John, and their children. Charles had fair sons, — John, 
A\ illiam, Charles, and Samuel. This John was a member 
of the Carpenters' Hall Convention in 1776, that framed 
our first State Constitution. William was the colleague of 
Robert Morris in the United States Senate in the first Con- 
gress, and the first Democrat Samuel was also a United 
Stales Senator, but was compelled to resign at the dictation 
of Miehavl Leih, the muster of the Democratic "machine" 
in Pennsylvania at the beginning of the nineteenth century. 



42 



"Old Mother Cumberland." 



The Maelavs have always been prominent in public affairs. 
William, a son of John, of Carpenters' Hall fame, was a 
member of Congress, 1815-10. John's sun, David,- wns a 
member of the Legislature, 1812-1-1, and David's son, David, 
now living in Chambersbnrg at the age oi' ninety-two. in 
1851-52. The first David's grandson, David, is chairman 
of the Franklin County Republican Committee. John, a 
brother of "William and David, sons of John, was sherilf of 
Franklin County, 1820-23. John Mac-lay, a brother of 
Charles the immigrant, and an elder in Middle Spring 
Church in 1747, had two sons, John and Charles. This 
Charles was a captain in Colonel Dttnlop's battalion, and was 
killed in the affair at the Crooked Billet. The Maelavs are 
descended from the Barons Fingal of Ireland. 3>y inter- 
marriage the Maclay family is one of the most' extensive in 
its ramifications in this country. 

South of us is the Middle Spring Church, around and be- 
yond which are Robert Chambers, a brother of Benjamin; 
John Williamson, the grandfather of the Rev. Dr. John 
"Williamson Xevih, and the father of the celebrated Dr. 
Hugh Williamson, whose name was associated with that of 
Franklin in the matter of the Hutchinson letters; the Mor- 
rows, of whom one Charles was a captain in Colonel Ben- 
jamin Chambers's battalion in 1 74S ; the Kaunas, from one 
of whom came General John Andrew llanna, the lawyer o{^ 
Carlisle and llarrisburg: John Reynolds, an elder in Middle 
Spring Church, ami the head of a family prominent down 
to our time; Colonel James Dunlop, father oi^ Andrew 
Dunlop, of the Franklin County Bar, who married Sarah 
Bella, daughter of General James Chambers, and grand- 
father of James Dunlop, the compiler of Dnnlop's " Digest ;" 
John Culbertson, 1 the ancestor of the Culbertson families ol^ 



1 This statement Is vigorously denial by some of the descendant) of 
the "three Irish brother-," Alexander, J<>-reh, and Samuel, who settled 
near on o another in "Culbertson 'a K<»\\," Franklin County. But the 
denial involves the necessity of ignoring J«*Un, wit » was. one of the orig- 
inal settlers of Shtp|»on^ur,g J 1730-I»&j James, who was a taxpayer in 



"OM Mother Cimberlmtd." . . 43 

Franklin County, and the father uf Captain Alexander Ctil- 

bertson, killed in battle with the Indians at Sidling Hill, in 
1750, with twenty of his command ; nnd John Rippey, whose 
son, Will ia m, was a captain hi Colonel William Irvine's bat- 
talion in the second Canada Expedition, 1770-77. Captain 
Kipper's company, one of the most typical of the Scotch- 
Irish companies from the Cumberland Valley in the Revolu- 
tion, was almost wholly a Shippensburg and Middle Spring 
organization. 

Above Maelay's IN rill emigration followed "(he course of 
the Conodoguiner to Roxbury Gap and into Path Valley, 
but the most important settlements were on Ilerron's Branch, 
and its tributaries, on both sides of the ridge that marks the 
divide of the water-sheds of the Susquehanna and Potomac. 
At the mouth of the branch were the JTerrons, from one of 
whom the Rev. Dr. Francis Herron was descended/and near 
them was "William Linn, die father of Rev. Dr. William 
Linn, pastor of a Dutch Reformed Church in New York city, 
and grandfather of the Rev. .John Blair Linn, poet and 
dramatist as well as divine, 1 Others equally noteworthy 
were the Trwins, Breckenridges, and Culberlsons, of Culbert- 
sou's Row. The Irwin family produced many prominent 
business-men; the Breckenridges were allied with the 



Hopewell nnd Lunran, 17o0 ; Oliver, also of Lurgafi at the same time ; 
and Robert, who took up lands in Peters as early as 17-13. The first of 
the Culbcrh-on name to come to America was John, who emigrated in 
1712 and settled in Chester County. His name disappeared from the 
tax records after 172G. The account of him and his descendants in the 
"Culbertson Genealogy" is very obscure. One son, John, died in 
Chester County in 1 7*57. Uobert, of Peters Township, may have been 
the elder John's son. In that ease he is the ancestor of the Culhert.-ons 
of Virginia and North Carolina. All this bringd us no nearer to John, 
of Bhippeiisburg, and leaves James and Oliver unaccounted for. Oar 
information touching the antecedents of Alexander, Joseph, ami Samuel 
of the " Tow" is equally meagre. How I reached the conclusion that 
John, of Shippensburg, 'was the ancestor of the Culbertsons ^>( Pranklin 
County I do not remember: hut 1 found it in my notes, made a number 
of years ajro, and I have concluded to let it htand until refuted. 



i 
\ 

4 

i 

44 "Old Mother Cumberland." 

J 

Breekenridg;c families of Virginia and Kentucky ; ami of 
the Culbcrtsons, one, Samuel, was colonel of a battalion of 
Associators, while his cousin Koljcrt was lieutenant-colonel 
of Colonel Dimlop'a battalion. 

Sweeping westward, north of the ridge were more Cul- 
bertsons, and the Cessna, Pinky, Henderson, MeConiiell, 
and MeCammont families. James MeCammont, the younger, 
who lived near Upper St rasburg, was almost as celebrated an 
Indian fighter as the Bradyg, and he had an interesting Rev- 
olutionary history. He was major of Colonel Culbcrtson's 
battalion, but, as a member of the Convention in 1788, he 
was opposed to the ratification of the Federal Constitution, 
and absented himself from the House to break a quorum. 
He was taken out of his bed by Captain John Barry and 
thrust into the Chamber, after which the doors were locked 
and the Constitution ratified. In what is now Hamilton 
Township we shall find Joseph Armstrong ntid JM atthew 
Patton. That Armstrong was a very early settler .we know 
from the fact that he joined with Benjamin Chambers and 
others, in 1738, in the agreement te~pay the Rev. Samuel 
Thomson the arrearages due him for preaching to the people 
of Conocoeheague. lie commanded a company in Colonel 
John Armstrong's battalion at the beginning of the French 
and Indian "War, and was a member of the Assembly in 
1758-59. His sbny'born in 1700, known as Colonel Joseph, 
commanded a battalion of Cumberland County militia in 
J776, one of the battalions of which we have meagre knowl- 
edge. One of the companies in this almost unknown bat- 
talion was commanded by Captain Samuel Culbertson, with 
John Culbertson as lieutenant, and the Rev. John Craighead, 
Robert and Joseph Culbertson, and James Finley as privates. 
Another company was under Captain dames MeConnell, 
with John MeCohnel! as lieutenant. Lieutenant Matthew 
MeConnell, of Captain James Chambers's eompanv in 1775, 
was of this family. Matthew Patton Was the ancestor of the 
Patton family of Peters and Montgomery, prominent down 
to our time. Samuel Patton is imoted as a captain in Colo- 



"Old Mother Cumberland." 45 

nel Joseph Armstrong's battaHom, as well as Robert Cul- 

bertson, Charles Maday, and John Pea. . j 

In what is now St. Thomas Township wo shall find Robert 
Clugjctfge, James Campbell, James MeParland, and John 
Hollidav. Cluiriraire removed to the neighborhood of Shir- 
kysburg, and bis son Robert was captain of the Bedford 
County company in Colonel Thompson's Battalion of Rifle- 
men in 1775. Campbell, a captain of horse of the house of 
ArgrVb in the Scottish rising of 17-15, was the grandfather 
of General Charles T. Campbell. McFarlandwas the ances- 
tor of our McFarlands, and llolliday was one of a family 
that was very active in the development of Southwestern 
Pennsylvania. All these are represented in the rosters o^ 
officers of the Revolution. St. Thomas was a part of Peters 
Township at the time of the organization of Cumberland 
County. In what is still Peters the earliest settler was Wil- 
liam McDowell. The McDowell tradition is that he settled 
on his farm near Bridgeport, where was McDowell's fort of 
Indian warfare, about a year after the settlement of Ben- 
jamin Chambers at Falling Spring. This was probably in 
1735. He was driven away by the Indians in 1750, and 
died at Wrightsvillc, in York County. He was buried in 
the graveyard at Donegal. Of his sons, William was an 
ollh-er of the Pennsylvania Line in the Revolution, John 
became Provost of the University of Pennsylvania, ami 
Thomas was the father of our venerable townsman, "William 
II. McDowell. John was the first native of the county ad- 
mitted to the Franklin County Ban Darnell's Knob, under 
the shadow of which the McDowells lived, has been so called 
beyond the memory of man in this section; we know noth- 
ing of Pnrnell, not even his Christian name. Robert Mc- 
Coy, one of the commissioners to settle the bounds o( the 
county, lived in what is now Montgomery Township. It is 
evident that he was a prominent man in the a Hairs of the 
valhy, but we have entirely forgotten him.- His neighbor, 
William Maxwell, was one of the first justices of the 
county. James Plaek was the first settler on the site <>t' 



46 "Old Mother Cmibeiioml" 

Mereersburg. Black' was quickly followed by William 
Smith, also one of the justices of the peace at a later period. 
AVilliam was the brother-in-law of James Smith, the hero of 
the opening chapter in ii Border Life." Even at this early 
period Dr. Hugh Mercer was practising physic in the 
families of these pioneers. But the parents from whom 
came the two most distinguished of the sons of Franklin 
County were yet to come, — those of William Findlay, Gov- 
ernor of Pennsylvania, and James Buchanan, President of 
the United States. 

.Swinging from West to East Conococbea&ue, we cannot 
tarry long hy the way. When we reach the crossing west 
of what is now Greencastle, we will find James Pody settled 
on the tract which Audrew G. MeLanahan sold to the Mor- 
mons more than half a century ago. The Kennedy settle- 
ment is not far away at the continence of the two brandies. 
Lazarus Kennedy, a descendant of John, the settler, died 
there within four years. Where Greencastle now stands is 
the farm of William Allison. It was many years later that 
the town was laid out by his son John. John Allison was a 
member of the Pennsylvania Convention of 1776 and of the 
convention to ratify the Federal Constitution of 1787. He 
was also colonel of one of the Cumberland Valley regiments 
of the "Flying Gamp" in the Jersey campaign of 177G. A 
mile to the eastward is the " Old Bed Meeting-JTouse," and 
around it are some of the earliest settlers of Antrim,- — Jacob 
Snively, James Johnston, ami Joseph Crunkleton. Crunkle- 
ton attempted to found the town of Crunkleton, hut it died 
" a-horni ng." The present Snively family of Greencastle and 
its vicinity are descendants of the " honest Swiss," Jacob 
Snively, at whose house the Rev, Michael Schlatter was a 
guest in 1749. James Johnston was the ancestor of a dis- 
tinguished posterity. Three of his sons — James, John, and 
Tliomas 1 — were respectively lieutenant-colonel, major, and 
adjutant of Colonel' Abraham Smith's battalion of Cumber- 
land County Associators in 1777--7S. In 1780 James Johns- 
ton commanded the battalion and Thomas) was a captain. 



"Old Maker Cambcrltml." 47 

Another son, Dr. "Robert Johnston, was a distinguished sur- 
geon in the Revolution, and it was with him that President 
Washinsjton stopped to dine when he was on his way to 

quell the "Whiskey Insurrection in 17 ( J4. Thomas Johnston 
was an ancestor on the maternal side of Johnston Moore, 
of Carlisle, and Dr. Johnston McLanahan, of our Society. 
Abraham Smith, who commanded the battalion in which the 
Johnstons held such conspicuous rank, was in Antrim 
Township before 1 7 -J Y , and James McLanahan, the ancestor 
of the McLanahans, before 1742. One of James McLana- 
han's grandsons was James X. McLanahan, member of 
Congress from this district, 1849-53. Others of the early 
settlers whose posterity I might trace for von if I had time 
were John Mitchell, David Scott, Joseph Alexander, Thomas 
Brown, and Henry Pawling. Xear Brown's Mill was John 
Potter. He was the first sheriff of Cumberland County. 
One oi" his sons, Thomas, was hilled by the Indians at the 
time the Bard family was captured in Adams County, where 
he was on a visit. Another, son, James, was brigadier- 
general of the Pennsylvania militia with Washington's a'rmv 
in 1777. Whether he was a good fighter I cannot say, but 
1 know that in his letters to Washington his spelling was 
execrable. 

But here we arc at home. We have little knowledge of 
the early settlers near Falling Spring, outside of Colonel 
Benjamin Chambers, upon whom the Muse of History con- 
ferred her most precious gifts, to the exclusion even of his 
own son, Colonel James Chambers, who took a company of 
ritlemen from this part of the valley to Cambridge in 1775, 
and was -lieutenant-colonel and colonel of the First Regiment, 
Pennsylvania Line, 1770-81. dames Chambers's son Benja- 
min bore a conspicuous part in the organization of Indiana 
as a State, but we have entirely forgotten him. 

Such were the men of whom *' Old Mother Cumberland'' 
was the mother. 



48 Friends' BitTrial-GrQttttd, JBurloifjtvn^ Xac Jersey. 



FRIENDS' BUIUAL-GBOUND, BUKLIXGTOX, NEW 

JERSEY. 

BY ROWLAND J. DUTTON". 



i 



The writer has been requested to prepare a sketch of the 
title to the Friends 3 Burial-Ground in Burlington, Xew 
Jersey, and to furnish a list of the interments therein, so far 
as a record of them lias been kept, under the belief that 
there are many descendants and collateral relatives of those 
named upon the record who would be interested in such a 
paper. In colonial times Burlington was closely allied with 
Philadelphia in its social and business interests and inter- 
course; consequently, many families residing in Philadel- 
phia and its neighborhood are included in the above-men- 
tioned descendants. 

Charles 1L of England having granted to his brother, the 
Duke of York, his heirs and assigns, an extensive, tract of 
land, part of which was what is now the State of Xew Jer- 
sey, the latter "by his deeds of lease and release bearing 
date. 23rd and 24th day of June 1604" granted to John 
Lord Berkley and Sir George Carteret the tract by which 
they became sole proprietors of Xew Jersey. About 1075 
Lord Berkley gold his half to John Fenwick in trust for 
Edward Byllinge and his assigns. There being some differ- 
ences between Fenwick and Byllinge, they were settled to 
their satisfaction by the otliees of "William Perm. The latter 
was prevailed upon by Byllinge to take the trust o l i said 
tract in connection with Gawen Laurie and Nicholas Lucas, 
two of Byllinge's Creditors. 

Among the purchasers of portions of the above-named 
tract were two companies, one o\^ Friends from Yorkshire, 
and- the other ^^ Friends from London, who* together founded 
the town on the present situ of the city of Burlington. 

The first deed found relating to the property upon which 









■•-. c 



* • V 7 *i 









V ' -~ 



VS "■■' 






■J(: 



7. 



v» -^ 



•.« k - -•-!*- 



/ 



/'/N 



-v 



■ •-/;;•* .•- V r - 



V* r. > . 






•\ : 



v. S 






■ i7<' 



I . 






Friends' Burial- Ground, Burlington, Awe Jersey, 49- 

the Friends' Meeting-] louse stands, ami which includes the 

burial-ground, is as follows, viz. : 

" tjbtS UtlCCUtUVC, Made the fourteenth day of the Twelfth Month 
Commonly Called February, in the year of Our Loid, according to the 
Computation used in- England, One thousand six hundred and ninety & 
two — Betweene. Sarah Farr of Farrsfield in the County of Burlington, in 
the Province of West New Jersey, widdow, Relic & Executrix of Lli.is 
Fair late of Farrsfield afores'd yeoman, deceased, of one part And Thor as 
Gardner of Burlington in the said County of Burlington Yeoman, dieh- 
ard Bassnett of the same, Innholder, James jSIarslldll of the same M'ch' : 
Henry Grubh of the same Innhold"", John Dave of the County of Bur- 
lington aforesaid, Yeoman, Isaac Marriott of Burlington aforesaid M'eh 1 : 
James 11 ill of the same, Cord wayner, and Peter Frettwell of the same, 
Tanner, of the other port. 

"Whereas, the aforesaid Elias Farr (the late husband of the said 
Sarah Farr) bv his last Will and Testament, bearing date the Five & J 

Twentieth day of December Anno 1001 — after several sums of Money or 
Legacies by him therein given, and bequeathed, did nominate make and 
ordayne the said Sarah Farr (his wife) full and sole Executrix of his said 
Last Will and Testament, to whom he did therein give & bequeath (after 
sundry Charges, Debts and Legacies paid and discharged) all the residue 
of his Estate both rcall and personall whatsoever and wheresoever not 
therein given and bequeathed As by this same Last Will & Testament 
(duly and legally proved att Burlington aforesaid, and remaining in the 
Begisters ofilce there) reference thereunto being had may fully ami att 
large appear. 

"Now this INDENTURE WITNESSETH, that as well for ami in Con- 
sideration ofTenn shillings currant money within the Province a fore-aid 
by the said Thomas Gardner, Richard Bassnett, James Marshall, Henry 
Grubb, John Dave, Isaac Marriott, James Dill & Peter Frettwell to her 
the said Sarah Farr, before the sealing and delivery thereof, in hand paid 
whereof 'and wherewith slice doth hereby acknowledge herself fully satis- 
fied, contented and paid — as also, and more especially for and in con- 
sideration of the love, favor and affection which she hath and bcarcth 
towards that Society, Body or Congregation of Friends in Burlington 
aforesaid (commonly called Quakers) with whom ahec doth now join in 
fcllowshippe, congregate and walk: And to the intent therefor, that the 
land and premises hereinafter mentioned and expressed, shall and may 
from henceforth forever hereafter, Enure, continue, remain, and U» to 
and for the peculiar benefit, accommodation, advantage, and behoofc, el 
the same society, or body of Friends, successively; sheo the >aid Ktarati 
Farr hath given, granted, and Sold, Allycned, Enfeoffed, and Continued, 
VOL. XXIV. 1 



50 Friends' j&maf'&rinwd, Burlington , New Jersey. 

and by these, promts doth fully, clearly ami absolutely five, grant, and 
Sell Alycu Enfeoile and Confirm unto tin: said Thomas Gardner, Richard 
Bassnett, James Marshall, Henry Grubb, John Paye, Isaac Marriott, 
James }fill e>: Peter Frettvell Feoffees in Trust and to their successors 
from time to time successively to be nominated, elected, and chosen upon 
the decease of any of the Feoffees by their surviving Feoffees or tbe major 
}>art of them forever — One peece or parcel of land fronting the High 
Street in Burlington aforesaid being part or parcel! of the land to her the 
said Sarah Farr there laid forth and surveyed i'<>r her Towne Lot and to 
her appertcyning in right of her *hare or shares of Land in the said Prov- 
ince of West New Jersey which said granted or hereby mentioned to be 
granted peece or parcell of Land container in Breadth Seavcniy four foot 
and in Length extending to the next street called Wood Street Westerly 
and agjoyning southerly upon the other Parcell of Land to her the said 
Sarah Farr belonging, Coiiterriing Forty foot in Breadth (and which was 
with the. said Seaventy foure foot of Land hereby granted also laid forth 
and surveyed to and for her the said Sarah) And adjoyning northerly 
upon the Land commonly called John PenrifoixFs Land.— Together aisoe 
with all and singular waves, waters, easements, priviledges. advantages, 
and appurtances whatsoever to the said granted or mentioned to be 
granted premises belonging or in anywise apperteyning — And all the 
Estate, Right, Tytle, Interest, use, possession, property, Clayme and de- 
mand whatsoever of her the said Sarah Farr as well in Law as in Equity, 
and cither of them of in or unto the same, or any part or parcell thereof. 
— And the Reversion and Lever-ions Remainder and Remainders thereof 
— and of every part thereof — To HAVE and to hold the said Lott of Land 
and granted Premises and even' part and parcell thereof with the Ap- i 

purtenances unto the said Feoffees and to their Successor and Successors, 
successively elected and chosen from time to time as aforesaid forever — 
In tru>t nevertheless to and for the onely use and uses herein.-. iter per- 
ticularly mentioned and expressed and to or for noe other use intent, or 
purpose whatsoever — That is to say such part thereof for a convenient 
Burying place or burying ground and the other part thereof for the 
Erecting of such Building and Buildings thereupon with such suitable 
conveniences to the same As in the judgement and discretion of the said 

Feoffees and their successors lor the time then heinir or the major imrt of 
.... 

them from time to tunc seem most meet and expedient — The same Bury- 
ing ground when laid forth, and Building and Buildings when erected 
with the Conveniences thereto as aforesaid, and the issues, prolUus and 
advantages thereof, to be, Continue and Remain to and fox the use, 
benefit and advantage of the same Society or body of Friends as afore- 
said forrvermore — And the said Surah Farr for l»er*elfe. her lleir-^ Ex- 
ecutors and Administrators doth covenant, grant, and agree to ami with 
the said Feoffees and their successors by these presents in manner and 



Friend* Bur'ad-Gronnd, Burlington, Kan Jersey. 51 ■ 

forme following (That is to say) That sUec the said Sarah Farr att the 
time of 111- ensealing and delivery of those pre.-ents hath good rijrht, full ; 

power, and absolute and lawfull authority to give grant Alyen, Convey 
and Confirm the said peece or parcel! of Land and nil other the suitl 
granted or mentioned to he granted with tli' appurtenances (to and for 
the use and behoof aforesaid) unto the said Feoffees and their Successors, 
as aforesaid forever, according to the tcnour true intent and meaning of 
these presents, And alsoe that shee the said Sarah Farr and her JUir-, 
Executors, and Administrators, tire said peece or parcel! of Land hereby 
given, granted and sold or mentioned or intended to he. herein and hereby 
granted and sold with the rights priviledgcs advantages and Appurtaiices • 
thereto belonging unto the said Feoffees and their successors forever 
(from time to time to be elected as aforesaid) against her the said Sarah 
Farr and her Heirs and against the Heirs of the aforesaid Elias Farr and 
against all and every other person and persons whatsoever lawfully Clayra- 
ing or to Claym by from or under her, them, or any of them, shall and 
will Warrant and forever defend by these presents — And further that the 
said Feoffees and their successors as aforesaid (for by and under the yearly 
Quit Rents accustomarily from henceforth issuing and payable forth of 
the said granted premises unto the Chiefe Lord or Lords of the said 
Province) shall or lawfully may from time to time and att all times for- 
ever hereafter peaceably and quietly have hold occiipie poscsse and injoy 
the said peece or parcel of Land and granted premises and every part. and 
parcel thereof with th' appurtenances and take and receive the issues 
prolitts and advantages thereof to the oncly use and uses in these pres- 
ents before declared without the Lawful Lett, Suit, Trouble, denyal, 
Eviction and Ejection, molestation or disturbance of her the said 'Sarah 
Fair, her Heirs, Executors or Administrators or of from or by the 3 lei res 
of the aforesaid Ellas Farr or of any other person or persons whatsoever 
lawfully Clayming or to Clayme by from or under her them or any of 
them, or by her, their, or any of their means assent, consent, act, Title 
privity or procurement. 

"Axj> Lastly that slice the said Sarah Farr and her Heires, shall 
& will at all and every time and times, hereafter during the tyme and 
space of Scaven yeares next ensuing the .date hereof, att the reasonable 
request, Costs and charges of the said Feouees and their Successors afore- 
said or the major part of them, make doc, acknowledge, and execute or 
cause or procure to be made done, acknowledged and executed all and 
every or any such further and oilier lawful Act and Acts, Thing and 
Things Conveyances and Assurances in the Law whatsoever for the far- 
ther, better, more full, and perfect Conveying Confirming, and Assuring 
the said granjed premises and every and any part or parcel! thereof with 
th' appurtenances unto the said lYotlees ami their successors for the time 
being aforesaid forever to tlie use and uses aforesaid according to the 



52 Friend*? JBuritd- Ground, Burlington, Xeic Jersey. 

purport, true intent and meaning of these presents As by the »:»id Feoffees 
and their fc"ucee^?ore for the tyme then being or tlie major part ot' them 
shall be reasonably devised, advised, or required Sue as t lie Person or 
Per.-on* to whom such request shall be made be not Compelled or hereby 
or thereby Compel lably to Travel or goc further than to the Town of 
Burlington aforesaid for the making doeing or Executing thereof And 
soe as such further Assurance Contained noe farther or other Covenants 
or Warranty than according to the Tenour of these presents. 

"Ix Wrrxiss whereof the said partie First above named to this 
present Indenture hath sett her hand and hereunto ailixed her seale the 
day and yeare First above written. 

(Signed) "Sarah Fare [seal] 

"Signed, sealed and delivered 
the day and yeare that 
is withiu written 

"In the presence of us, 

* ' Edwa kd H cslok e 

Ik p. Gov r . 

"Tuo. Jlr.viiL Justice 
"Thomas; Bibb 
"William \V. Gill 

hi* 

"Michael X Bould." 

mark 

The next deed in order of date is the following-, which 
conveys what is now the whole property occupied by the 
meeting-house and hurial-^Tounds, extendiup; from High 
Street, uniform width, to Wood Street, which is as follows, 
viz. : 

"tEWS HUfcCntUrC, Made the Twentieth third day of October in 
the Seventh yeare ot* the Keigne of Anne of Great Britiatn, France & 
Ireland Queen ^c and in the year of Our Lord One thousand Seven 
hundred and Eight 

"J'ltwlkx John Uudyard of Pertli Am boy within the County of 
Middlesex & Province of New Jersey, Mariner, of the One uart, And 
Samuel Uuuton, ot* Che*terlivM, l\.ur Frettwcll, Thomas Gardiner, and 
Thomas Raper of the Town uf Burlington, all of the C »unty &f Burling- 
ton and rroviuee uftore^aid, of the other part — Witnesseth 

11 WmiREAS Thomas Rudvurd K~q. did tn^etnei with John Riges Cit- 
izen and Skinner of Lon<V>u luteins 8 of William IVnnof !!.• . rth, 
in the County of ilert&rd l*-[, G&wen J.aurie of Loi Ion M reliant, 



Friend*'' ]3>/riaLGro<>rj>, BnrliJig{on, JSctr Jersey. 53 

Nicholas Lucas on Hertford in tlio County of Hertford, Midster, and 
Edward ByHiiig of Wcstmin-ter, County of Midel-cs Gen*', one equal 

and undivided hundredth pare of that tract of land in America Culled & 
known by the name of W&*i New Jersey now the Westerly Devision of 
New Jersey, to be Equally Divider! between the send Thomas Riidyard 
& Joan' Rfgea as tennants in Comon, as by tin-Ire Deed of Lease and 
Release barring Pate the first and second days of March Anno y e 
Dorui 1076 Relation thereunto being had is may & will more att Large 
Appear. 

"And WllERfiAS the Said Thomas Rudyard, Deceased, by his Last 
Will and testament bareing Date on or about the seventh day of Decem- 
ber in the year of Our Lord for One thousand Six hundred Eighty and 
five Did Give and Devise unto the said John Rudyard party to these 
presents by the. Name of John Ritdyard his Natural son, the above men- 
tioned and Recited halfc propriety or hundred part, but for want of Words 
of Inheritance, in the Said La.-t Will and testament doth only Extend to 
an Estate for Life, As by Said Last Will and testament may snore alt- 
Large Appear.- — Axr> Whereas, Benjamin Rndyard Deceased, the Son 
and Dei re of the Said Thomas Rudyard Deceased, Did by Good and 
Sufficient Conveyance in the Law Did Grant Bargains Sell Release 
Assure Confirm unto George Willocks of Perth Amboy Within the Prov- 
ince, Merchant, And Margaret his Wife Daughter of the Said Thomas 
Rudyard Deceased, all the Lands, Propriety^ Plantations Reversions, 
Remainders, and Appurtenances Which Descnded to him as hcire 
abovesalrl A\'ithin the Provinces of East and West New Jersey — now the 
Province of New Jersey to them and theire heirs forever, as in and by a 
Cartaine Deed or Instrument Remaining upon y* Publick Records of 
New Jersey and bareing Date the ihirteiuh day of Eebuary Anna Domini 
1602 may more att Large Appear. Now the said George Willocks and 
Margaret his Wife by their Indenture of Convayance bareing Dated the 
twelfe day of October Anno Domini) 1708 hath in these "Words ("oven 
Granted allei ned Itemized and Released (amongst other Lands) one tract 
of Land Lying and Being in Burlington aforesaid Containing One acre 
and halfe and Lveth on y e West Side of the High Street, and so back- 
ward^ to the next Street. 

" WiT.\j>sr.Tii that the said George Willocks and Margaret his Wife, 
the only surviving Child of the said Thomas Rudyard Deceased for the 
Love and Affection they bare nnto the sakl John Rndyard as will as f.-r 
and in Consideration of y° snme of live Shillings the Receipt Whereof 
they do hereby acknowledge //■•(•'• (iiven Granted AHeined Remised Ke- 
lea.-cd and forever Qtiitetl 'Clarnic unto y* said John Rndyard his lairs 
and A-signe> all the E-tate, Right title Intrust Reversion Rem:'.: wler 
Clayme and Demand that they the said George Wilh»cka aud Margaret 
his Wife have <-r ought to have Either bv vertue of the Above Mentioned 



54 Fririids' Biirbil-Grttiwd, JSarVnfft'jn, Xar Jersey. 



Conveyance from Penjamin Pudyard 01 by Pight of Inheritance as being 
the only surviving Child of >:ti<! Thomas Pudyard Deceased to y" Lands 
therein mentioned &c 

''Now this IxnKXTri'.r. \\~iTNK3.sr>T|l that lor and In Consideration 
of the Just and full Snme of Sixty pounds Cnrent silver money within 
the Westerly Division of .-aid Province of New Jersey by theju Lbe said 
Samuel Bfthton, 1 Peter Frettwell, Thomas Gardiner, & Thomas Paper in 
hand paid att and befor the En-ealing and Delivery of these presents the 
Receipt whereof bee the. said John Pudyard doth hereby acknowledge 
and therewith boldeth himselfe fully Sattisficd Contented and paid — doth 
hereby fully and Clearly and Absolutely Acquit Release and Discharge 
them the said Samuel Buntun Peter Frettwell Thomas Gardiner, and 
Thomas Paper, their and J Aery of their heirs, Executors Administrators 
and Assignee forever by these presents — by these presents Hath Granted 
P>argained and Sold Aliened Enfeoifed and Confirmed and by these pres- 
ents doth fully and Freely Grant bargaine and sell Enfeofe and Confirm 
unto them the said Samuel Bunion, Peter Frettwell, Thomas Gardiner 
and Thomas Paper theire heirs and Assigns forever — One tract of J. and 
Lying and being on y' ; We-t Side of the High Street in Burlington afore- 
said Containing One acre and halfe and Runneth back to the Second 
Street and it that tract of Land whereon the people called Quakers hath 
Builded their Meeting house &c — 

"To Gether With all and singular the AVays Passages Yards Backsides. 
Buildings Mines Mineralls and all other the Poyaltics Prolliltes Comud- 
ities Hereditaments and appurtananecs unto the Said One Acre and halfe 
of Land, belonging or in any Wise Appertaining. And all the Right 
title Intrust Possession Propriety Clay me and Demand Whatsoever of 
him the said John Pudyard both in Law or Equity of into or Out of the 
hereby Granted Land and Premises with their Appurtenances and Every 
part and pareell thereof and the Peversion and Reversions Remainder 
and Remainders thereof, and of Every part and pareell thereof. To 
Have and to hold the One Aere and halfe of Land and hereby Granted 
and Bargained Premises and Every part and parcel! thereof unto them 
the said Samuel Buivton, Peter Frettwell. Thomas Gardiner, and Thomas 
Paper, their heirs and A«sijrnes loreveimore — And the said John Pud- 
yard for himself, his heirs Executors Administrators and Every of them 
doth Covenant and Grant to and with them the said Samuel Punton, 
Peter Frettwell, Thomas Gardiner and Thomas Paper, their heirs and 
Assigns by this present-, that- att the time of the Ensealing and lVliverv 
of these presents lice the slid John Pudyard Hath Good Light full 
Power Lawful] and' Ah-utute Authority to Grant liargaine and Sell the 
said One, acre and babe of Lain! and. premises and Every part and par- 
cell thereof with appurtenances unto thorn the said Samuel Run ton, Peter 
Frettwell, 'J Lenas Gardiner, and Ihoinas Paper their heir- and Assigned 



Friends' Burinl-QrotriHl, BurlittgtQtt, New Jersey. 55 

/V.rvvor, — according to the purport true intent and Meaning of these 
presents. 

"Ami Aloe that the sajul One acre and halfeof Land and premises, 
and Every part and parcell tliereof with Appurtenances shall from hence- 
forth forever Pemaiue and Continue unto the said Samite! Bunton, Petti 
Frettwell, Thomas Gardiner and Thomas Raper, their heirs and Assijrnes 
Freely and Clearly Acquitted Exonerated and Discharged of and from 
all and all manner of other and former Bargains, Sales, Gifts, Grants, 
Dowers, Joyntures, Leases, Rents, Charges of Rents Entails, Judgements, 
forfeitures, Executions and all or any other Incumbrances Whatsoever 
further than the Quirt Rents thereout Issueing to our Soreren Lady the 
Queen, her heirs and Successors, and the Arrerages thereof IT any he. 

"And Alsoj: that them the said Samuel Bbntoii, Peter Frettwell, 
Thomas Gardiner, and Thomas Kaper their heirs and Assignes Shall and 
May from henceforth forever Peaceably and Quietly have hold use occupy 
posses and Enjoy the Said One acre and halie of Land and premises and 
every part and parcel 1 thereof and Receavc and take the Rents, Issues 
and Profitts thereof Without y e let or interuption Denial! or Contradic- 
tion of the said John Rudyard his heirs or assignee or the licirs of 
Thomas Rudyard Deceased or George Willoeks or Margaret his Wife or 
their or Either of their heirs or of any other person or any other person 
Olayming or to Clayme under him her or any of them by these presents 
Shall forever be utterly Excluded and Debared 

" And Fukther, hee the said John Rudyard and all persons Claim- 
ing or to Clayme by from or under him Shall and Will att all times here- 
after During the Space of Seven Years next Following Date of these 
presents Shall and Will att the Peasionable Request Cost and Charge of 
them the said Samuel Punton Peter Frettwell, Thomas Gardiner, and 
Thomas Paper their heirs and Assignes make doe and sutler or cause or 
procure to be made don or sutl'ered all such Further and Other Lawi'ull 
Cost and Costs Matters or things Whatsoever for the further better mure 
full and perfect Convaying and Assuring of the hereby Granted and bar- 
gained Land and premises and Every part and parcell thereof with Ap- 
purtenances unto them the said Samuel Punton, Peter Frettwell, Thomas 
Gardiner and Thomas Paper, their heirs and Assigues forever, according 
to the true Intent and Meaning of tluve present- as by the saifl Samuel 
Bunton, Peter Frettwell, Thomas Gardiner, and Thomas Raper their heirs 
and A>signes shall be Reasonably devised, advised, <u- Required S-v as 
the person or persons to whom such Request shall be made be not hereby 
compelled or compelable to travill not above the Space of twenty miles 
from the place of his or her usual aboad for the Docing and Executing 
thereof. 

"And soe as Mich Further Assurances Contain noc other nor Further 
Covenants than in these procnts is comprised. 



5G Friends' Burial-Ov&iwd, Burlington, New Jersey. 



"In \ViT3fES3 Whereof the forty rcfSt above named to these present 

Indenture Hath liucKaangahly Sett hi* Jiund and Scale the Day mouth 
find year first above written $rc — ' 1705. 

(Signed) *'JX0. KUPYAEP [SEAL] 

"Sealed and Delivered 
in tire presents off 



his 

"Geo. WrLLixg 

mark 

"Samuel Fuettwell 
"Emanuell Smith" 

" October 23rd J70S 

"Keceived then of y- above named Samuel Bunion Peter Frettwell, 
Thomas Gardiner and Thomas Raper y c above mentioned sume of sixty 
pounds being y e full consideration sume for me. 

"John Rudyakd 
Attest 

".George O V/ii.ling 

"Samuel Fi:ettv.*ell 
"Emanuell Smitil" . 

The above deed is endorsed upon the back : 

i 

" October 8$rd 17 OS — 

"Then came before me Richard Ingoldsby Esq Deft. Gov r of the 
Provinces of New Jersey and New York the -within named John Rud- 
yard and acknowledged the Within Deed to be his act and Deed therefor 
I allow y c same to be Recorded. 

"Rich Attn Ingoldsby 

"January -i l!i 1711 Entered in the Publique Records of New Jersey 
Lib. A. A. A. Fob 385 & 3?0 bv me 



i 

i 

[Ihc Thomas Kudyard referred to in this (hvd was a lawyer of 
London, noted for his csstetnAoe at the trial of Peun arid Mead. He v.:is 
appointed by the Twelve Pruprh tors of East Jersey deputy-governor. 
Robert Barclay (author of the Apology) having been appointed fbr Ufa 
Die governor in lo$3. — See "Smith's History of Now Jersey."] 

On the 9th day of'Fourth month, 173C. all the trustees, 
Samuel Bunting, Pbter Frettwell, Thomas Gardiner, and 
Thomas IJaper, bving deceased, — 



Friends' Burial- Groin* J, JBurlwgton, New Jersey. 57 

" John Punting the Son jtnd Heir of Samuel Bunting the 
surviving Feoffee who was the longest liver of the afore- 
mentioned Feoifees,'/ conveyed the one acre and a half to 
""William Morris, Hiehard Smith, Joshua Raj^er, Daniel 
Sraitlr, '.Robert Smith, Joshua Parker, Thomafc Pitch*, John 
Buitin, Marmadukc Watson, in trust. 

The declaration of trust, being signed by all the above 
the same day. 

On the 28th day of Xinth month, 1770, William Morris, 
Robert Smith, and Thomas Pryor, surviving trustees under 
the deed of the 9th day of Fourth month, 173G, conveyed 
the one acre and a half in trust to John Hoskins, Daniel 
Smith, Samuel Allinson, Clayton Xewbold, Stacy Potts, 
Caleb iS'ewbold, Henry Burr, John White, Joseph Smith, 
William Dillwyn, Joseph Sclioley, and Isaiah Pobins. 

The declaration of trust is dated fifth day of Eleventh 
month, 1770, and signed by all the above-named trustees. 

On the 14th day of Twelfth month, 1810, John Hoskins, 
Clayton Xewbold, Joseph Smith, Isaiah Robins, and Wil- 
liam Dillwyn, by his attorneys, Samuel Fmlen and John 
Cox (W. D. at that time living in England), conveyed the 
one acre and a half (and defining the courses and distances 
and position of party lines' fur the first time, as agreed upon 
between a committee appointed by the Quarterly Meeting 
on the 10th day oi' 12th month, 1707, and the owners of 
the adjacent properties) to John Deacon, William Allinson, 
Caleb' Gaskill, Richard M. Smith, Peter 11. Ellis, Samuel 
Punting, Penjamin Zelley, Charles Gaskill, Benjamin Sat- 
tertliwait, and Benjamin Clark, Jr. 

All of them signed the declaration of trust, dated 2Cth 
day of Second month, IS 11. 

On the 21st day of Sixth month, 1S37, John Deacon, 
William Allinson, Caleb Gaskill, Peter IL Ellis, Samuel 
Punting, and Penjamin Satterthwaile conveyed the one acre 
and a half (defining the courses and distauees) to Robert 
Thomas, Daniel Wills, Thomas Dutton, Joseph Porton, 
William J. Allinson, Joel Ik Middle ton, Samuel Allinson, 



oS Frknits' B*triaf -Ground^ Burlington^ New Jersey. 

Jr., Isaac Crnttj Daniel Satterthwaite, and Watson Nev- 



boJ 



The declaration of trust was. signed by all the above- 
named trustees on. the 29th day of Eighth month, 1837. 

On the 27th day of Fifth month, 1800, Isaac Craft, being 
the only surviving trustee of the above, conveyed the premi- 
ses, defining lines and distances, to Rowland J. Button, 
Richard Mott, Thomas Lee Haines, William Bishop, George 
Wood, Samuel P. Barttett, Merritt W. Pharo, Charles 
Wright, Jr., John B. Comfort, and John Dalzicl, and the 
declaration of trust was signed by all of them at that date. 

The portion of the ground that was laid oil* for a burial 
ground contains about an acre. It was formerly enclosed 
by a paling fence on the east end and by a close board fence 
along the driveway to the carriage-sheds on the south side. 

About forty years ago the old fence was removed. 

It is to be regretted that there was no careful record kept 
of the interments there until about the year 1823, at which 
time Robert Thomas and Thomas Button, with the assist- 
ance of a former aged sexton, Joseph Pearcc, and of John 
Weaver (acting in that capacity at that time), prepared the 
first map of the ground, and made a record o{ the inter- 
ments, so far :is the sextons could locate them. 

The removing of the old fence took away some of the 
landmarks, which were guides in locating the graves and 
spaces upon the ma};, and it became necessary to make an- 
other plan, which was done principally by William F. New- 
bold in the year 1870. 

In the new map the plot is laid out in twenty-eight 
sections, — thirteen sections being on the north side of the 
cement walk and the remaining fifteen on the south side 
of said walk. 

Tin* numbering of the sections commences at the west 
end on the north side and ends at the west end on the south 
side. 

Most of the corners of the sections on the south side have 
been marked by marble posts with section numbers upon 



Friends' JBmrtl-GroKfid, Biniwgtoiu New Jersey, 59 

them. The sections of tlie north side are designated by the 

panels of the brick wall, which extends the whole distance 

on that side from Ili^h to Wood Streets, excepting the \ 

eastern section, Xo. Io. which takes in one and a half panels. 

lire large buttonwood-irees at the eastern end of the yard 
are supposed by many to he original forest, trees. Henry \ 

Ariniit Brown, in his oration on the occasion of the bi-t-en- 
tennial of the settlement of Burlington, referred to them as 
follows: "The twin sycamores by yonder meeting-house 
stand guard above a soil enriched with the bones of six 
generations of your kindred/' . 

It is believed that a portion of this ground was used for 
burials from the earliest settlement of the town, — 1678, — al- 
though the first deed is dated "J 092. There has been a 
tradition that the ground occupied by a portion of this and 
where Broad and Wood Streets are was an Indian burial- 
ground; but the only evidence of burials has been the find- 
ing of portions of skeletons or. the south side of Broad 
Street east of Wood Street when digging the trenches for 
the water-pipes. 

The first record of interment in Burlington is the follow- 
ing extract from " Smith's History of New Jersey*' (sec note * 

foot of page 93) : 

"dohn Kinsey wa3 one of the Commission sent in 1677 
by the Proprietors of West Jersey to buy the lands of the 
nathes, &e, ; he died at Shackamaxon soon after his land- 
ing; Ins remains were interred in Burlington in ground 
appointed for a burying ground hut now a street.''' 

It is reasonable to suppose that this interment Mas in the 
street at the western end of the present burial ground, and 
that the street referred to is Wood Street, as Broad Street 
and Jligh Street were laid out immediately by the settlers. 

From the time ot' this interment up to that within the 
memory of the old sextons consulted in 1 S - 8 , — a period of 
considerably over n century, — there must have been buried 
in this ground many persons who were actively and usefully 
prominent in the affairs of the Province and Stale, such a- 



CO 



Friends* Burial-G found, Burlington, Nac Jersey. 



Governors Samuel Jennings and Thomas Olive, ami other 
leading men, as William Peachy, Thomas Gardiner, Robert 
Stacye, and many others. ... 

The Indian king, " Ockaniclcon," died about 1681. 
"Smith the Historian" states "lie was attended to his grave 
in the Quakers' burial plaee in Burlington with solemnity 
by the Indians in their manner, and with great respect by 
many of the English settlers, to whom he had been a sure 
Mend/' 

For an interesting interview with his nephew. shortly be- 
fore his death, see " Smith's History,'' pages 148 to 150. 

By reference to the memoir of John Smith, who married 
the daughter of James Logan, of Srenfon, it appears that he . 
was interred in this burial ground, but there is no record of 
the locality of his grave. 

In the early minutes- of the meeting there is an entry, — 

"Peter Wooleort is willing to make Graves — and Friends 
are willing to see him paid an Old English Shilling for such 
mens and womens graves y* may not be paid for by y e per- 
sons y* employ him.*' 

Bernard Davendish 1 was sexton in 1GS9. James Sat- 
terthwaite succeeded him in 1G95.. 

John Jny Smith, in his M Recollections" (page 356), states 
that his great-grandfather, Richard Smith (No. 4), died at 
Amboy 11 mo. 9th, 1751, and was interred in Burlington, 
New Jersey. 

The Pt/ui.^/lrani'a Guzetfa of 11 mo. 21, 1751, records, — 

"Xastwcek died Richard Smith Esq of Burlington AVest 
New Jersey, and was l)uried in Friends burial ground in 
that city; in whom the character of a generous, good na- 
tured, hospitable man, of a true patriot, ami a good Christian 
were so truly blended, that lie lived beloved and esteemed 
by all that knew him, and hi- death is lamented as a public 
loss by the people of that province/' 

1 Spoiled in jsoine old document* " l^vouieh." 
(To be continued.) 



Pcnnsjhania and the Eojlish Government, 1609-170^ 61 



PENNSYLVANIA AND THE ENGLISH GOVERNMENT, " 

1G09-17U4. 

BY HERMAN V. AMES, UNIVERSITY' OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

[The following transcripts of manuscript documents in the British 

Record Ofiice, London, were made by the undersigned duriug tlie past 
summer. These extracts are typical of the valuable unpublished ma- 
terial relating to the Colonial History of Pennsylvania, which is con- 
tained in two series of Colonial Entry Bootes, entitled "Proprieties" and 
"Plantations General" respectively. A half a century ago the Histori- 
cal Society of Pennsylvania published in its series of Memoirs (Vol. IV., 
Part II., pp. 225-885) "A Catalogue of Papers relating to Pennsylvania 
and Delaware, deposited at the State Paper Office/' covering the period 
1670-1718. This catalogue is not complete, and the references; cited 
have been to a considerable extent superseded, owing to the fact that a 
few years after its publication all the papers were removed to the new 
Record Ofiice, where they have been rearranged and reclassified. 

An excellent description of the number and classification of the docu- 
mentary material relative to America, preserved in the Record Office, is 
given by the late W. Noel Sainsbury, formerly Assistant Keeper of the 
[Public! Records, in an article entitled "The British Record Otliec, and * 

Materials in it for Earlv American Hi-torv," in American Antiquarian 
Society Publications, meeting held in Boston, April '26, 1SI»3 ; Worces- 
ter, 1£ ( J3; as also in a paper by Professor Charles M. Andrews on 
American Colonial History, 10(»0-17f»0. in the Annual Rc]H>rt of the 
American Historical Association, 1S*)8, pp. 55-57*^ No more important 
contribution could be made to the Colonial History of this State than 
the publication of all the important documents calendared in the above- 
mentioned catalogue, as well as others now in the Record Office col- 
lections, relating to Pennsylvania, By so doing this State would be 
following the example of several of the. other original Slates. 

The following documents fall into two groups, the first comprising a 
selection of Letters of Colonel Robert Quary, the second 1. -tiers ami lie- 
ports of the Pvjard of Trade. The author of these letter.-, ( Vn-nel Robert 
Quary, after having been Governor of South Carolina in ! ;< 1 and 1 01*0, 
and, at one period intervening, Secretary of the Province* \v;u* appointed 
Judge of the Admiralty in New York and Pennsylvania, where he i> 
first met with about K'JT. In 1701 he w.'s promoted to the itfhcc of 
■Surveyor-General of the Customs of America t<» succeed Kdward Ivan- 



62 Ptimsifhania and the ErirjUsJi Government, 10^0-170!,. 

dolph. Jji addition to filling the-e.oi'.iees. lie was a member of the Coun- 
cil of at least four of the Colonies at the game time. (New York Col. 
Doc., V. 471.) From the character of his voluminous correspondence 
it is apparent that he was an cnoray of proprietary governments in een- 
cral, and that of Pennsylvania in particular, and in consequence waa 
very zealous in presenting accusations against both JYim and the people 
of Pennsylvania. His own character was not above suspicion, as he had 
been charged, at two different times, with complicity with pirates. Vvnii 
describes him as " the greatest of villains and God will I believe, con- 
found him in this world for- his lies, falsehood. and supreme knavery." 
(Pcnn-LogaO Corresp., JI. 2S9l) The Loard of Trade, however, seem 
to have relied quite fully upon his reports of the condition of the diiTer- 
cnt colonies, as they frequently cite his letters in their reports to the 
Crown or .to Parliament. His death occurred about the year 1712. 
New York Col. Doe., V. 1 1>'J, note; New Jersey Arch., II. 2S0, note; 
Shepherd, Proprietary Government in Pennsylvania, 399, 502, note, 
503, iT.; Holies, Pennsylvania, I. 177-179. 

lit the catalogue published »n Memoirs of the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania (Vol. IV. Part II.) forty letters and memorials (between 
1697-1709) of Colonel Quary are calendared. Six of these have been 
published, in whole or in part, as follows : 

1G99, June 1. Cited Men*. IV., Part II. 289; published X. J. 
Arch., II. 277. 

1G90, June o. Ibid., 2*9, 290; N. J. Arch., II. 2S0. 

1703, October lo. J bid., 34-1 : X. J. Arch., III. 7. 

170-1, May SO. IbiL, ?,-l$ ; X. Y. Col. Doc, IV. 10S2 ; X. J. 
Arch., III. 52. 

1707, June 2*. Ibid. f 303 ; X. Y. Col. Doc, V. 17. 
. 1709, Decembers. Ibid., o72 ; X. Y. Col. Doc, V. 111. j 

Five other letters of his, not cited in the above-mentioned catalogue, 
are in print, as follows : _ i 

1702, June 17. To the Lords of Trade, opposing appointment of 
Andrew Hamilton as Governor of -We-t Xew Jersey, X. J. Arch., 

II. 179. 
170o, June 16. To the Lords of Trade. An Account of the Condi- 
tion of the Colonies, X. Y. Col. Doc, IV. 1045. 

1707/8, January 10. To the Lord- of Trade. An Account of the 

Defences of the Colonics, X. Y. Col. Doc, V. 80; X. J. Areh., 

III. 271. 
1709/10, February 10. To the Lords of Trade. An Account of the 

Maryland Assembly, X. V. Col. Doe., V. 161. 

1710, July o. Letter to Mr. I'ultcncy. An 'Account of Governor 
Hunter's Administration in Xew Jersey and Xew York, X. Y. Col. 
Doc, V. 165: X. J. Areh., IV. 0. 



JPem t st/l V on (a and the English Government, 1G99—170£* b'3 

The foltenrkt* extracts from six letters of Colonel Quary are selected 
from the period l*tiML704, and, as far as known, have not been before 
published. All but the first are apparently cited in. the catalogue, al- 
though in the ca^e of the- third under a different date. 

The second group of extracts arc taken from ileports and Letter.- of 
the Board of Trade of the period 1G99-170D, and relate to the atlUirs of 
Pennsylvania in particular, or to the Proprietary Colonics in general.] 



I. 

Extracts from a Letter of Colonel Robert Quart/, June 19, 1700} 

"The next thing that I will offer to your Honour consid- 
eration to the present State [of] this Province, it grows 
very Populous, and the people are generally very laborious 
& industrious, they have improved tilledge to that degree 
that tlicy have made bread, flower and Beer a drugg in all 
the Markets in the W&st Indies, so that finding that Truth 
over done they resolve to go on with the" planting of Tobacco 
in the three upper Countys where never any was planted as 
yett, the land is very proper for it and will produce very 
bright Tobacco, the number of people, and their Industry 
will produce vast quantitys, they find the necessity of going 
upon this Coinodity for they have no oilier way of making 
returns home for England, the want of which makes this 
place at present very miserable; I niu sure there is more 
than six times the value of Goods imported than is exported 
winch is the reason that the money is carried away, T can 
assure your ]Ion r Mhat it will be as much for the Kings In- 
terest to secure the Trade of this Bay as that of Maryland, 
and in a little time they will vie with that Government.'' 

Extrorts from a Letter of Colonel Robert Qmry, fated Pi^'t- 
delph.kt, Koeembvr 14, 1700.- 

"I do humbly beg your Lords tups patience to lay before 

you the elfeets which this extraordinary Inhibition or Coiii- 

1 Proprieties, 15. 22$, 229; Plantations General, IV JS4; cf. [feard 

of Trade Journal, E. S3. 
5 Proprieties, H. -121-27. 



G4 Pennsylvania and the English Government, 1699-1704.. 

inlssion hath already produce*!, 1 and what the consequence 
of it will be, they have already raided all the reflections and 
affronts they could devise on the Kings Advocate and my 
self, giving out that we were sent fur to England and there 
to be find to our ruin, and whatever we have or shall do 
will be made void at home; but all this noise made no im- 
pression on me, nor did I take any notice of it, till I found 
that they had prevailed on Gov. Tenn, so far as to make him 
violate that Solemn promise which he was pleased to give 
me and so often confirm (ed), viz : That he would not in 
the least invade the Eights and Jurisdiction of the Admi- 
ralty, but that I should excreise all the powers of your Lord- 
shins Commission though he thought there were some things 
that bore hard on him, however he would content himself 
with a representation of it to your Lordships and Expect 
your opinion and directions in the Matter. * I gave your 
Lordships an Account of this in my former, but now his 
Friends have so far prevailed on him that with out any re- 
gard to this promise he hath lately granted Commissions to 
all the Sheriffs- of the Counties (a copy of which with the 
Decree I have here inclosed to your Lordships) by which 
3*ou will see that in effect he hath broke into the Jurisdiction 
.of the Admiralty, and invaded all most all i\\c powers, I 
have discourst him about it, who is pleased to assert it as his 
right & that the Admiralty hath no jurisdiction within the 
body of the County, so that consequently, if I must not Exe- 
cute the powers of vour Lordships Comniission within the 
body of the County, then I must go put of the Capes, which 
is oill of this Province, and that of West Jersey & beyond 
my Commission, I am empowered to Act within these Prov- 
inces but have no power to act without them, I was ex- 
tremely surprised to hear this Doctrine from Gov. Penn 
after so many promises to the contrary, and alter I had done 
him the Justice of representing all things home to your 
Lordships as much to his advantage -as I could, all the dis- 

1 A decision o[ ^ir Charles Hodges in the High Court of Admiralty 
releasing a vessel which had been ?ei«ed in Pennsylvania. 



Pcmixylcania and the English Government, lG90-17Qi, 05 

course of the Country is that the Admiralty Court Is taken 

from this Province, and that now Gov. "Perm hath appointed 
officers to Execute the powers of that Court, for my own 
.port I hwvc charity enough to believe that Gov. Perm would 
never have taken those measures were he not under a neces- 
sity of complying wiih his Quaker Friends especially at this 
Juncture when they arc setting in Assembly k he expects 
considerable supply from them, I know the temper of those 
men so very well that I am sure that .they will not part with 
their money unless they can govern as they please, so that 
Governor Pcnn is reduced to this great straight, if he com- 
plys with his here; then he must violate all his promises 
which he hath made at home, for supporting the Kings 
Authority in his Government, and if he doth not comply 
with them, then he must not expect any money from them. 
I doe heartily wish that silence in this case were consistent 
with my duty and the Trust which your Lordships base re- 
posed in me; I am sure it would he far more satisfactory 
than to complain. I have a great regard for Mr. Penn and 
have not been wanting in my due respect to him, but I can 
not with out betraying your Lordships, omitf the Represen- 
tation of those Matters. I will beg leave farther to mind 
your Lordships, that there ought to be no time lost in re- 
establishing the lung's Authority, and your Lordships powers 
in the Government, the proper method \i>v effecting if is 
humbly submitted to your Lordships wisdome, and the effect 
these measures will have. in the neighboring Cblonys to the 
discouragement of the Admiralty (which is so much relied 
upon to secure the King's interests) is recommended to your 
Lordships thoughts, I have nothing farther to offer to your 
Lordships in relation to the Inhibition but to desire that you 
will be pleased to order that the King's Advocate c~nd Coun- 
cill may attend this Cause to defend his Majesty's Interests 
k stop the.reversall of this decree. 

"I do not question but that your Lordships will (\o us 
justice and not suiter the malicious underhand contrivances 
Vol. xxiv. — 5 



CG Pennsylvania and the Entilish Government, 1600-T70/ f . 



Extracts fro ni a Letter of Colonel Qmr^ nlatlnrj to Irregularities 
committed in tJ>.e Plantation as also to the Treah and Defence 
thereof, .March 31, 1702} 

"I now come to Pennsylvania, the circumstances of which 
place in relation to its illegal Trade would require a longer 
memorial, but this being designed only as General Heads, I 
shall at present confine my Self to the General Charge that 
an illegal Trade is carried on in that country and neighbor- 
hood rather wurse than ever . . . 

" Mr Teim hath' made a great noise about his Acts to pre- 
vent illegal Trade, but they have not been two pence advan- 
tage to the Queen, or so much as taken notice of since they 
were made, nor have they answered any one end, but that 
of his own, which was to make fail* weather. at home, and 
impose on the world, which point he hath gained. 

"I must now beg leave to lay before your Lordships the 
State and condition vi these her Majesty's provinces as to 
their State of Defence. Should any Incursion or Invasion 
be made by the Indian-, and here 1 shall consider that the 
great number of her Majesty's subjects on the main are 
divided into a great many provinces, and in every one they 
are scattered and dispersed very wide asunder, So that it is 

1 Plantations Ccncr.il, (\ 86, 90, Pi, 9S-10C, 



of our Enemies to take place. I have no favour to ask of 

them, being fully satisfied in my own conscience, that I have 

in all Matters that ever came before me Judged and Decreed 

betwixt the King and his Subjects according to Law and 

Justice, I am sure no Man in America ever took more pains 

to serve his Majesty than I have and perhaps with as good 

success, especially considering what a sort of perverse people 

I have had to struggle with; I should not have found the j 

effects of their Mallice could they have frightened or whecded ' 

[wheedled] me from my Duty, and whenever I qui 1 1 the 

Kings service, I shall have their favour as much as any man, 

if I valued it." \ 



Pmisykcaua and the English Government, 1GOO-I70 f h 67 

impossible for anv province to fortify the Frontiers against the 
Indians, nor con they maintain a constant Force in Anns to 
secure them. What then can hinder the Indians from tailing 
into any of the plantations, and half mine fhem'beforc they 
con he in a condition to defend themselves. I do very well 
know that Virginia and Maryland arc under the best circum- 
stances, both in respect to the great number Of men, and the 
advantage of having such experienced and vigilant Generals 
to command them on such Occasions, yet considering how 
they are dispersed and how badly most of them arc armed; 
Some Iiave Guns, some none, but little amunition, and the 
most of them not fit for service, or action should there be 
Occasion ; All which considered, it is much to be feared, that 
should an Enemy fall into these Countries, it would be of 
fatal Consequence, many of the out Settlements must be cut 
oil' before the rest can be drawn into a Body to resist and 
repeli the Force. Tho' I am sure at the same time nothing 
would be wanting in the Governour that is in the power of 
man to do. 

" Pro]uieties : — Xow if we consider all the proprietary 
Governments, we shall find them in no wise capable to de- 
fend themselves. — Carolina nothing but anarchy ami confu- 
sion,. Some places perhaps have the name of a Militia, and 
that is all for they want arms and amunition and all things 
else for their defence, nor have they any act to enforce it. 
They will it may be once or twice in a year under the pre- 
tence, of Exercise, when their buisness is wholly to bo drunk. 
In some provinces there is neither Militia, arms nor amuni- 
tion, no not so much as a Military Commission, but the 
Queen's subjeets are exposed to all the Miseries Imaginable 
both by Land and Sea, which is the Case of Pennsylvania. 
And yet Mr. l.Vnn Endeavours all he can to invite all foreign 
Indians known to be Villains, and some French lately come 
from Canada, to come and settle in his Countey only for the 
benefit vi' a Trade with them, which he takes care whuly to 
ingrosjj to himself by ordering the Indians not to permit nny 
to trade with them, but siieh as can show an Indented 



OS Fetiwyh-mnn nod the fiwjlkh Gormmpxt, 1000-1704. 

Lyeenec and Ins Seal, What Mr. Penri's profit from this 
tattle may be I know nolj but am nineh-^fraid it will prove 
to be the loss of many J. hoi;.-;!' ids Subjects Lifes, if not 
speedely prevented by her Majesty's Cave I will now with 
all due submission to your Lordships better Judgment pro- 
ceed to show the Cure and remedy of all these Evils and 
mischeifs. 

"I do propose, as si most essential thing, that her Majesty 
do take all these proprietary governments into her own 
hands, That she will be pleased to appoint prudent Gover- 
nours and particularly in the province of Carolina. .. . That 
a law may be made to regulate the Indian Trade which will 
improve that Trade to a vast advantage, and may be a Fund 
to defray all the charge of the Government. ... I propose 
likewise that a Good Militia be settled in every province, so 
well fitted & armed, that they may be aide and always in 
readiness to defend themselves and their neighbors* . . . 

" As for the other Governments to the Xorthward of Caro- 
lina, I can not for my part see any thing that can prevent 
great Destruction amongst them in Case of an Invasion by 
the Indians but a Considerable Garrison on the Frontiers of 
Albany, well supported and supplied. Nothing else can 
steady the five Xations to the English Interest For when 
they find those Frontiers are -so supported as that they may 
depend for security and Defence from thence, they will then 
continue firm and steadfast which is o( no small consequence, 
and if this was duly considered it ought (I think) to make 
the several Governments Sensible of their Danger, and exert 
their utmost endeavours to provide tor their Common Se- 
curity, For whenever we loose those five Xations, it will not 
only be the loss of so many Friends, but the adding so many 
powerful nations to our hnemicis; There will be nothing 
then to hinder them from ranging over the Maine, and bring- 
ing mine and destruction, on which Government they please. 

" Virginia and Maryland have often felt fatal and evil 
effects from these very Indians, even when they were 
Friends, and therefore ought to dread their Revolt. 



Pennsylvania and the English Government, 1000-170//. 09- 



"But so far are they from such necessary and reasonable 

consideration that the J 'resent Assembly of Virginia are of 

Opinion that the support of Albany doth no way concern 

them, which, I must confess ] could never have believed, 

Had I nut been an Eye k an Ear Witness of it. and had 

I not seen those many powerful, significant and weurhty 

rcasons, which his Excellency the Goy r of Virginia made use 

of in his Several Speeches to show them their true Interest 

and Danger, and which he pressed with a generous and 

candid Temper and all the endearing calmness imaginable; 

hut all to no purpose. They were resolved neither to give 

anv monev nor send any Quota. Neither Reason, their own 

Safety, nor Ins late Majesty's Commands could prevaile. 

Thev were, so possessed with these following mistaken 

/ ] ° j 

notions . 

"-.That the Government of Xcw York liad misinformed 
his majesty. 

" That the support of Albany was only to maintain an 
Indian Trade for that Government. ' 

" That considering the Distance. It did no way effect 
them; whether the Frontiers of Albany were maintained or 
slighted* 

"That in Case of War they had enough to do to defend 
their own province, and that therefore their Country could 
not spare cither Men or Money; not considering that at the 
same time they put the Country to three times the Charge 
(in the time they spent in debating these matters) more than 
would have paid wind the King required of them, and I find 
that this malignant humour is not confined to the Govern- 
ment of Virginia,, but is diffused more or less through all the 
Settlements on the Maine. I have indeed spent some time 
and thoughts to find out the true Cause of this Strange Al- 
teration and Change, which is so remarkable in the humour 
and Tempers of the people in those parts. My long F.x- 
pcrience in the several Governments under her Majesty on 
the Maine gives me ye Advantage of knowing that no 
people could he more Loyal to their prince, more Ohedicut 



70 Pivnstjh'onm (w<l the JSrigtisfi Government, 1699-1704.. 

to Law,- more respect full to Governour and more ready to 
Answer her Majesty's Commands. 

"That their Humours are of late Soured, and their Tem- 
pers in some respects changed, is Obvious to every Man. 
And for me to consider that it is (as indeed it is) the Interest 
and Security of all the Plantations on the Main to contribute 
towards the Support of Albany and its Frontiers, and that 
the Charge is so very inconsiderable. I say when I seriously 
consider all This, to see the Security and Unconecrncdness 
of most Provinces on the Maine, and to see them so averse 
generally to the raising their respective Quota's, not only 
the proprietor Governments but those of the Xing Govts, it 
doth amaze and astonish me. I have sometimes believed 

that it- might proceed from those late Licentious Common- 
er i 

wealth principles, too much improved in England and which 
hath been the Subject Matter of so many Scurrilous and 
Scandalous Pamphlets, enough to corrupt the Morals and 
Principles of good Men, if not well guarded against the per- 
nicious & subtle poison. Put upon more Mature Considera- 
tion I have good reason to conclude that the Cause and Foun- 
dation of this Malignant humour is to he found near home ; I 
mean from the Severn! Xeighhouring Charter Governments. 
And this may he easily demonstrated, if we consider that the 
people under the proprietors do very Seldom or never pay 
any Taxes for the Support of the Church or State. They 
entertain and eneourage pirates. They carry on all Manner 
of Illegal Trade, violate all the Acts made to prevent those 
Evils. The\ ail'ront the King, his Laws, Authority and 
Officer*, and by all those Pisloyall and unjust Actions they 
grow Pieh and get Estates, and have hitherto escaped the 
punishment and ju-t-reward of their Wickedness. This 
makes the people of the -Queen's Government murmur and 
repine and puts them on thinking, what should be the reason 
that their next Neighbours and Fellow Subjects should enjoy 
more Ease, Liberty and Frecdonie, under the proprietor's 
Government than they do or can under her Majesty, 

".And that which njjtrravutes their Discontents, these 



Pennsylvania oral ti>c Ettfjlish Gov eminent, lG!)d-170L 71 

people of tlic proprietory Governments make it their Bnis- 
ness to upbraid and reflect on them, h$. being Slaves and 
Miserable in Comparison of Themselves This ] know to be 
a Constant Practice and produces ill EibVts, I heartily wish 
proper and effectual Remedies may be applied before these 
discontented humours were improved to a greater height; 
and none other or better Expedient can be found than her 
Majesty's taking all the Governments into her own hands, 
Governing all, as near as possible may be, by One and the 
Same Law. This would make all Easy, Satisfied and Con- 
tented ; And untill this can be effected and Cornplcated, I 
can propose a plain, Easy and Expeditious way for her 
Majesty to oblige all the provinces on the Maine, to pay 
their Several Quota's with out Murmur; But to do that, 
shall wait your Lordships Especial Commands. . . . 

"And since it is not possible for the Government of New 
York to support the Charge of all this alone, and as unrea- 
sonable that her Majesty should send money out of England 
for this purpose, There can be no better meanes or Expedient 
found out, that what his late Majesty hath already in his 
AVisdome proposed, that is by an equal proportion or Quota 
of the Several Governments in proportion to their Circum- 
stances; than which nothing can be more just or reasonable. 
Especially since the Interest, Safety and Security of all the 
provinces depends so much upon the well guarding and de- 
fending those Frontiers. The Charge is very Easy and 
inconsiderable not to be felt by any of the people of the 
Government; I will give your Lordships a late Instance. 
The Assembly of Pennsylvania gave Mr. Penn at one Sitting 
two thousand pounds Clear of all Charges, Besides they have 
settled upon him in Taxes to the Value of one Thousand 
pounds per Annum and upwards; And this was lookM 
upon as a verj menu inconsiderable Present. He expected 
at least ten thousand pounds and perhaps in a little time will 
gain his point. 

"Then please to consider how very inconsiderable their 
Quota is in Comparison of this, And as I am informed he 



72 Ttimstylcama and the English Grocernmcnt, 1699-1704.' 

has set on foot a Subscription lor several thousands of pounds 
amongst the Quakers on his icoing home to prevent the Bill 
for-Jxe-iuiitiiiLr the Charter Governments to the Crown, Ami 
sets forth that the Consequences of her Majesty's taking that 
Country into her hands will if not depopulate it. at least 
stint its Growth. So formidable is the Queen's Government 
rendred to those poor deluded people, and rendering her 
Majesty's other Subjects of Equal numbers inconsiderable, 
in the most cTcpraviating Terms his Pen could invent, as I 
have it from so) Ac of themselves, that the Ohureho's Xumc 
is only taken in vain here. 

"But before I conclude I must beg Leave to tell your 
Lordships that J have been so happy as to see two Memo- 
rials relating to the proprietary Governments given by your 
Lordships to the Right Honourable the House of Lords. — 
Isothini; could brimc oreater Satisfaction to me than to find 
your LonUhips so Zealous and Active for the Queen's Ser- 
vice in that particular, as to inform yourselves so fully of the 
illegal proceedings and abuses of these proprietary Govern- 
ments, and which indeed, may it please your Lordships, hath 
much encouraged me to lay this also before your Lordships 
and to assert that what was before by your Lordships, laid 
before the Right Tlon b; ° : the House of Lords, is plain Matter 
of Fact, and the Greatest part of all .which is with in the 
compass of my knowledge, besides abundance more of as 
great moment and consequence. I dare not in the least 
doubt but that your Lordships will make the proper use of 
this Memorial in and to her Majesty's service, "which is the 
onlv End 1 aim at." 



Extracts from L,.ff, r from 0><>>hd Quory to Board^ dated in 
Pemtsi/hama, Dccanlcr 7, 1702} 

''Inclosed is a. Copv of what I writt to your Lordships 
from Plymouth the very day that I suyled thence where you 
will find Some remarks on some of Mr. Pcnu's late (fraud 

1 Plantations General, C. W4, 200, 501, 208, 200. 



Pewisylcania and the English Government^ 1000-170//. 73 

Charters which lie parsed a few days before lie left this 
Country; As also on several other papers which I then did 
Inclose to your Lordships I did then promise your honours 
the attested Copy of the Several Charters. I was then afraid 
that T should meet with difficulty in procuring the said 
Coppys with out some order from your Lordships, which 
proves a certain truth. I have tryed all ways to purchase the 
said copys at any rate, but can not. prevail, they Govern the 
Country by these Charters, and yet arc afraid or ashamed to 
have them seen. Mr. Penn as it seems now having groat 
assurance of Continuing his Government, then he had when 
lie granted these extravagant Charters which Destrovs the 
very being of Government, is now endeavouring by his 
Agents to recall or overthrow his late Charters, but the top- 
ping Quakers of this Corporation are resolved to hold their 
unbounded power as fast as they can ; So that all things is 
in a very great Confusion they flatter themselves that left 
what Government will Come they are above it all, having 
the Choice of all their Magistrates k Officers which can not 
be removed by any power or Assembly what ever. They 
have not only the Government of the City, but of the wh.de 
province, to that Degree that the Country is very uneasy 
what the Consequence will he time will shew. 

" I have thought it had been Mr. Penn's duty to have layd 
those Charters before your hon We Board, the Members of 
the Lower Cpuntys in their Address to your Lordships do 
sett forth that they cannot get Copys of them. I wait your 
Lordships directions in this point. 

44 At my arrival here T found that Mr. P,enn had tilled the 
heads of all his friends witli strange notions of his e\: in- 
ordinary great Interest at Court, & that her Majesty was 
pleased to blame him for not coming oftner to visit her & 
had given him assurances of Continuing his Government, he 
hath giw-n full encouragment to his Corporation to exercise 
the powers of the Amiralty; so that her Majesty's Olivers 
of the admiralty are but as so many Cyphers, nor doth the 
Custome house otliee signify much more. . . . 



74 Peimsybywia ami the English Government, 1C09-170/+. 

" I must not oniitt to acquaint your I^ordshipa there hnth 
been a great deal of Arts Industry used to impose on your 

Lordships a Second Sham Militia to Serve a turn, great 
pains was taken to persuade the people to list themselves 

•great promises made abundance of Strong Liquor Spent k 
fine Speeches, but all amounted to no more than the gather- 
ing together about 30 or 40 men, to compleat which forces, 
they draind the Goal of Some borrowed — some Servants 
and others, and after all the Scandalous ragged Regiment 
had not above Swords amongst them, no Shoes or Stock- 
ings k finding themselves exposed and ridiculed, the Lieu- 
tenant Governour was ashamed of his Militia,, so they are 
dismist and never appeared Since, tho I expect to find an 
Account of them in the Gazett which is the least that Mr. 
Penu can do, to let the world know how formidable a Mili- 
tia lie hath, to Defend her Majesty's good Subjects of this 
Province. I will not trouble your Lordships with the 
Quakers Severe threats against me & all others Concerned for 
her Majesty's Interests;, for ray own part I valine it not, but 
the hard Usage I met with in England by those Vexatious 
Actions brought a<c st nie bv Mr. Peon's Contrivance, one of 
w ch Actions is still depending doth verv much Startle the i 

Queen's Officers & makes them very unwilling to Act which 
is improved by the Constant Insults $ threats of the Quakers, 
who endeavour to persuade all men that Mr. Penn is the 
Chief Steersman at the helm of Government in England, I 
will deferr what doth further concern the Government of 
this Province being obliged to give your Lordships Some 
account of Xew York where I have lately been. 

"It is hopes and hearty wishes of all good men that my 
Lord Cornbury will rpiickly be the happy instrument ot 
healing the Breaches & restoring tranquility to the Poor 
Destraeted Inhabitants of the Jerseys, who are impatient till 
my Lords Commission comes, that so they may be freed 
from the tyranny of the Quakers, who are more inhuman 
then the Task Masters ot' Egypt, nor are we of this Province 



Pennsylvania and the English Gorernnu)>t, 1699—1704* 75 

with out some hopes in clue time by ypur Lordships aide we 

may recover the Influence of her Majesty's Grace favour 
and protection. 

"Enclosed an address of the 3 lower Counties to the 
Board, praying that they may be recommended to her 
Majesty's immediate Government." [Bundle E, Xo. 55.] 

Extracts from Letter of Colonel Quart/, of July 25, 1703} 

"It is the General! discourse of the Quakers, that the 
Lords of Trade k Plantation are Mr. Peim's Enemies but 
that he valines them not, having a greater Interest then all 
of them, and shall be able to carry on all of his designs in 
spite of them all ; This I am very well satisfied comes from 
Mr. Perm himself, for his Secretary Mr. Logan told a very 
worthy Gentleman in this Country, Mr. Jasper Yeats the 
very snme words in effect. . . . But Mr. Penn and all his 
friends have designed me for ruine, which they threaten 
hard." 

Extracts from Letter of Colonel Quary, elated October 15, JTO.j. 2 

[A letter thanking the board for recommending him to 
the oilice of survcvor-iceneral, 3 and giving an account of the j 

trouble in Pennsylvania.] 

" There is at present a very great Division and Confusion 
in tliis Government, Quaker against Quaker, the generality 
of the Country are very violent in opposing those that are 
for promoting Mr. Peim's Interest, the qunrrcll hath been 
Carrycd on so far already, that the Military and Civil] Oili- 



cers have been at Clubhdaw. The Quakers have Indited 
the Ollicers of the Militia, not sparing the young Gentleman, 
Mr. Penn him self, who they have presented in their Courts, 
this hath so disobliged the Lieutenant Govern, that he then 

1 Proprieties l>. 374. 
• Proprieties, K. 10*2. 

3 See letter of October 1">, 1703, to Board of Trade, seeking the ofiiee 
of surveyor-general, New Jers-ey Archives, III. 7. 



7G Pmmi/lvarda and the Et«}V>sk Government, 1699-170f> 



resolved to put the Queen's Order in force, and by his Pro- 
clamation to declare the proceedings of their Court against 
one of their Militia Olfieers voyd; this hath so insensed the 
Quakers that they resolve on revenge on this occasion, the 
Lieutenant Gov. sent to me for the Queen's Ordeiyhis Letter 
with my Answer is inclosed, all things are at present in great 
Confusion, and young Mr. Pekn so very uneasy with the 
Quakers, that he hath publiquely renounced them all, and 
hath put on his sword, he goes home for England in the 
Jersey Man of Warr from Xew York, and resolves to per- 
suade his Father to resign up the Government to her 
Majesty, and indeed Considering how confused and disharted 
this Government is that they refuse to Comply with .any 
thing that tends to Mr. Penn's Interest, but oppose him all 
they can, I am of opinion that Mr. J'enn will now be willing 
to part the Government on farr. easyer Termes than formerly, 
he hath quite lost the end of sending his Son over hither; 
there was a proposal made by a great part of the Country, 
to raise a considerable Sum of Money for Mr. Pcnn, pro- 
vided that he or his Son came to settle amongst them in a 
certain Limitted time, in pursuance of which Agreement, 
the Young Gentleman came over, but they are now so in- 
censed against both Father and Son, that they will not ad- 
vance a peny, So that he hath lost his Labour, and returns 
empty, nor will the Quakers give Mr. Penn's Luiet-Gov. any 
thing to support him." 

II. 

Extracts from I jitter of flu: Board of Trade to the Lord 

j<(^;<c^ Adjust .;, igod: 

(After citing charges against Markham being guilty ot 
encouraging and aiding pirates they say : — ) " The whole, 
body of the Government of Pennsylvania do set themselves 
in direct opposition to the Court of Admiralty established 
there by his majesty, some further instances whereof are as 
follows : 

1 Proprieties, B. 20. 



I%mi?$kmia and the English Government 1G99--7704. 77 

" They have endeavoured to persuade all men to refuse 
obedience to that Court; They have set up a sort of Ad- 
miralty Court of their own, or at least exercised a sort of 
Admiralty power, by arresting a ship and making proceed- 
ings against her at their sessions. The Justices of the Peace 
.at a Session did all they could to present the officers of the 
Admimlty as Enemies to their Government. 

"David Lloyd (who stiles himself Attorney General and 
takes fees accordingly yet refuses to put any tiling in suit for 
the King) insolently ridiculed the Admiralty Commission, 
•and his Majesties effigies 'ailixed to it, in open Court; and 
also said in open Council that whoever incouraged the set- 
ting up of that Court were enemies to .the Liberties and 
Properties of the People. 1 

"By these and many other such like means the officers of 
the Amiralty have been so discouraged, that Coll. Qnary, 
Judge of the said Court, complains in his last letter to us, 
dated the 18th of May last, 2 that, he had great difficulty to 
persuade the officers to remain in their places, and therefore 
presses with great earnestness for some remedy. (Accord- 
ingly they propose) that some speedy and effectual remedy 
be put thereinto. (That Markham be removed that) We 
are humbly of Opinion that it is not fit, that the said David 
Lloyd should be continued in anv Publiek Imployincnt what 
soever in the said Province . . . That redress of these 
irregularities be recommended to Mr. Pcnn." 

Extracts from the Answer of the Commissioners of Trade and 

Plant* if ions. 

To the Order of the House of Commons of the 3d of 
April, 1701, rerpiiring from this Board u an account of what 
complaints have been made to us in relation to the Trade, or 

Courts of Justice in the several Plantations in Ameriea, 

1 Colonial Record, I. r>41 8*, "><>">, G02, 603 ; Mem. Pennsylvania His- 

totical Society, Vol IV., Part II. 283, 294. 

5 1 «,1»0, Mem. Pennsylvania Historical Society, Vol. IV., Part II. 
2S7, »$*. 



78 Jfyiinsyleonia and the English Grovernment, 1000-170^. 

whether in the Proprietary Governments or elsewhere, and 
what we have done thereupon. Presented to the House of 
Commons April 24, 1701. . l 

" Pennsylvania. 

"The complaints against Mr. Markham, Lieut-Guv. of 
Pennsylvania for Harbouring and protecting Pirates, and 
against the whole Government of that Colony, lor their op- 
position to the court of Admiralty, erected there as in other 
places pursuant to the late Act of Parliament for preventing 
frauds and regulating abuses in the Plantation Trade, have 
been very great. 2 

"But directions having been given by their Excellencies 
the Lords Justices to Mr Putin 8 upon his going thither, for 
the reforming of those Disorders. "We received after wards 
an account from Col. Quary (Judge of her Majesty's Ad- 
miralty Court there) as well as from Mr. Penh himself, that 
he had made several advances in what had been required 
from him. 4 Nevertheless we have of late ap-aiii received 
complaints from Col. Quary, that Mr Peim, by grunting 
commissions to all the Sheriffs of Counties to be Water 
Baylifls, had broke into the Admiralty Jurisdiction and in- 
vaded the Powers thereof; and by denying the Admiralty 
any rigid of jurisdiction with in the Body of the Province, 
had in effect taken it wholly away. 5 We have likewise had 
fresh information from Col. Quary of private Trade between 
Pennsylvania and Cnrassaw (a Dutch Plantation) carryed on 
chiefly by Scotchmen, who clandestinely and illegally export 
Tobacco, and Import such great qualities of Iron, Linnen, 
"Wine, and other European Commodities, that they are sold 
there as cheap as in England.' 5 As to Pirates: Several per- 

1 Plantations General, B. A is, 455-452. Hoard of Trade Journals, 

B. 437, 415, P. 1, 8: Commons Journal, Vol. XIIL 502-005. (Ed. 
1S03.) 

•Proprieties*, 1'. 20, 66. 8 Ibid., & 82, 83, 85. 

•Ibid, 224, L'SO, 271. Mbi'd, 422. 

•Ibid, 427. 



Pcunsyfcania and the English Gotrcriiment s 1609-170J.. 79 

sous 1 who have themselves been formerly suspected of Fi- 
racv, arc settled near the, Cares of Delaware River. These 
persons wfyen Kill was there received his Boats, and supplied 
him. The}' went on Board him constantly," and took on 

shore quantities of East India Goods. Mr Penn lias im- 
prisoned these men, and seized some of the Goods, which 
(as lie informs us) shall be sent over. . . . 

" As to the Propriety and Charter Governments in Gen- 
eral; no Governour. whereof lias qualified himself according 
to the late Act of Parliament (except the Gov. of the Ba- 
hama Islands for whose good Behaviour Security has heen 
refused to he given hy the Proprietors.) Their Independency 
making it absolutely necessary, that some speedy and effec- 
tual care be taken to render them more subservient and use- 
fid to this Kingdom; "We humbly referr ourselves to our 
Report Dated the 27th March last, 2 Wkcreiu we humbly 
represented to the Honourable House, That the Charters of 
the several Proprietors, and Others lntitling them to abso- 
lute Government be reassnmed to the Grown, and these 
Colonies put into the same State and Dependency as those 
of her Majesty's other Plantations, without prejudice to any 
man's, freehold or property; winch we conceive can not 
otherwise be well effected, than by the Legislative Power 
of this Kingdom. " 

Extracts from a Lifter of the Board of Trade to the Queen, 

April 17, 1702} 

In regard to the General Defence of the Plantations, they 
write: — 

"And as your Majesty may please to observe by what we 
have before represented that the propriety Governments arc 

1 Proprieties,' R. 271, 224, 239. 

•Trade; It. 173. 

• Plantations General, C. 143, 144. 



80 Pennsylvania and the English Government, JC09-J704. 

in a State wholy defenceless, unci that the Proprietors have 
no way taken care of what has been demanded of them, or 
may be thought necessary for the common safety of your 
Majesty's subjects during a war. The Govs, in contempt of 
an express Act of Parliament being likewise unqualified for 
those commands. We do humbly oiler that for the present 
your Royal Letters be sent to the Several Proprietor and 
Charter Govts, requiring them to put them selves into a 
posture of defence against an Enemy, from whence never- 
theless We can not hope for a due compliance, untill those 
colonies be reunited to the Crown according to our former 
opinions/' 

Extracts from a Letter of the Board of Trade to the Queen 
relative to Governors' Salaries, April g 1703} 

"As to Proprietary and Charter Colonies, We can not 
propose any thing on this occasion. The Govs, of those 
Colonies not being appointed by your Majesty and depend- 
ing either upon the Proprietors or the people, from whom 
they have very mean and uncertain salaries. Which in- 
courages them to connive at unlawful trade and other irreg- 
ularities inconsistent with the interests of this Kingdome, 
which great mischief can only be remedyed, as we humbly 
conceive, by reducing those Colonies to an immediate de- 
pendence on the Crown." 

1 Plantations General, C. 240. 



William Haigc. 81 



WILLIAM HAIGE. 

BY MILLS "WHITE, JR., BALTIMORE, MP. 

In hi* " Contributions to East Jersey History/'' W. A. 
Whitehead in speaking of "William Haige, the Surveyor- 
General and Receiver-General of that Province, suggests 1 
that lie may have been the same person as the "William 
Haige who, in 1683 and 1684, was a member of the Pro- 
vincial Council of Pennsylvania, and adds, "it is not known 
that he left children." Again, in his "East Jersey under 
the Proprietaries," he states 2 that " nothing is known of the 
descendants of Mrs. Haige." 

Proud has informed us that William ILnire, the member 
of Pennsylvania Council, 3 " had been a merchant in Lon- 
don;" only one William Haige is mentioned in the early 
London records of the Society of Friends, and as will be 
hereafter noticed, he was styled " Merchant," and became 
Receiver-Genera] of East Jersey. 

In 1682 William Pyre was appointed Collector of Cus- 
toms for both Pennsylvania and New Jersey, 4 and there was 
no reason why William Haige could not have held positions 
in both Provinces, especially if appointed by his father-in-law 
to the office last filled. 

In London, Pennsylvania, and Jersey we find William 
Haige connected with the business of the American Col- 
onies, 'and he appears to have been a man of influence and 
position. He was a member of the legislative bodies of 
the Provinces of Pennsylvania and East Jersey, and also 
acted in the capacity of a surveyor in both Provinces 
(though holding office as such only in East Jersey). 

'P. 14. 

»N. J. Hist. Soc. Coll., Vol. I. p. 12G. 
•Hist. Pciuul, Vol. I. p. 237. 
•MuIfortTs Hist. N. J., p. ffijfc 

VOL. XXIV. — G 






i 
! 

I 

82 Wftifam ITai</c\ . 

Tlie following facts in regard to the William JIaiges of 

these two Produces appear to uphold Whitehead's stipposi- 

tion and to show that they were the same; and furthermore, 

'that he left at least one surviving child, and probably more. 

From what part of England the Ilaige family originally 
came is uncertain. The Parish Registers of Cheshire show 
that persons of the name resided there in early times, and ' 
those of other shires probably convey similar information. 

In different accounts of tlie family, the name is variously 
given as ITnsre, Hagge, ilairue, Haisr, Haige, JJaigh. Haisrue, 
llauge, Hayg, I large, arid Ileage, and in ihe extracts given 
below the original manner of spelling is retained in each 
case. 

The first mention seen of William Haigc is in Friends' 
Records at i: Devonshire House," London, in which his name 
is spelt both Ilaig and ilaige. We there learn that William 
Ilaige, of London, Merchant, and Mary Laurie, daughter of 
Gawen Laurie, of London, were married at Devonshire 
House, 12m6., 22 nd , 1G71 ; l llaige's parentage not being 
given. 

The births of two children are recorded as follows : " Oba- 
diah, &., 7mo., P*, 1074, son oi^ William &*Mary Ilaige, of 
King Edmund's Parish, Lombard St., London; Rebecca, &., 
8 mo., 4 lh , 1C81, dan. of William & Mary ] iaige, Golden 
Leg, Court, Chcapsidc, Parish of St. Mary le Bow." 

When Edward Lyllinge tailed he agreed, to present to his 
creditors his half interest in the Province of Xew Jersey, 
which lie had acquired about 1GT-1 or 1075 from Lord 
Berkeley, and persuaded William Penn to join Gawen 
Laurie and Nicholas Lucas (two of his creditors) as 
Trustees. They became Trustees for one-half part o*i the 
Province, which, though then undivided, subsequently 1 July 
1GTG became the Province of West Xew Jersey; George 
Carteret's half becoming Lust Xew Jersey, These Trustee* 
booh sold a considerable number vt^ shares of their propriety 
to different purchasers, who thereupon became proprietors 
1 All dates in thi< article arc oKl style. 



milium Haw, ■ 83 



(aceprtling to their different s}ifLK?s) in common with them. 1 
William Penu, et ah, August 29 and 80, 1070, deeded to 
William IJaige, of London, merchant,' one-ninetieth part of 
ninety lull equal undivided parts in West Xow Jersey, the 
same being one full share of propriety, 2 

. It being necessary to agree upon some scheme to promote 
the settlement and ascertain a form of government, " The 
Concessions and Agreements of the Proprietors Freeholders 
and Inhabitants of the Province of West Xew Jersey, in 
America''* were drawn up, mutually agreed upon and signed. 
They hear date of 3 rd day of March 1676/7, and were signed 
by William llaig, as well as by Penn, Laurie, and others. 3 

In the antumn of 1G81 Penn appointed William Ilaige 
one of his four Commissioners for settling the colonv of 
Pennsylvania, laying out a town, &c. ; and the commission 
which he issued, to them, dated 25 Oct. IGSi, has been pub- 
lished in Hazard's Annals. 

They took passage in either the "John and Sarah" or 
"Bristol Factor,'*' which sailed for the colony in the autumn 
of this year, and arrived on or before 11 December, 4 except 
William Crispin, who went probably in the " Amity," and 
died iu Barbadoes, where she was blown by adverse winds. 5 
Thomas Holme, who probably acted as Crispin's successor, 
arrived in June lt>S2, and found the other three awaiting 
him. 6 

William Haige's daughter Rebecca having been born Oc- 
tobcr 4, 1681, he doubtless left his family in England. Be- 
fore sailing lie probably purchased 500 acres of land to be . 
located in the colon}', for his name appears in Philip Ford's 

• 

1 Smith's Hist. X. J., p. 79. 

1 W. J. Deeds, B, pt. 2, p. 624. 

'Smith's Hist. X. J., \\ 521-30; X. J. Archives, 1st Ser., Vol. J. 
p. 269. 

*Seliarfs Hist Del., Vol. I. }». 82; Fmlicy & Copes, Hi>t. Cluster 
Co., ]»i». 10 ami 147 ; Janiipy** Win. Penn, p. ISO. 

M'enm*. Mag.', Vol. XXII. p. 44, 

• Ibid, Vol. XIX. p. 418. 



84 



William Uaige, 



list o$ those lo whom hud had been granted prior to May 
22, 1GS2. 1 • 

Soon after arriving in America lie seems to have pur- 
chased land in West Jersey, for Hannah Saltar, by deed 
dated April 15, 1082, convoyed two cottages and certain 
lots in Burlington lo "William Jlaig, 2 no residence being 
mentioned for him in same, hut as no other person of his 
name is known to have been in America at that date, he 
was probably the purchaser. 

At the first 'meeting of the Free Society of Traders, 
which owned large tracts of land in Pennsylvania, held in 
London-, May 29, 1682, for choosing officers, William Uaige 
was elected one of the committee of' twelve to reside in 
Pennsylvania. 3 

Thomas Fairman appears to have had one of the best or 
most convenient houses on the site of the future Philadel- 
phia, and we are told that lie boarded and lodged Mark- 
ham, Uaige, and, Holme ami family at different times. 4 

In the early part ot^ the year 1682 reports came down to 
Lord Baltimore "that one W m Hague, a quakcr and much 
employ'd by Mr. Penn, had taken observations att the Head 
of the Pay which very much dissatisfied y° Said Hague and 
other friends; for upon those observations it was given out 
by the Quakers that if the Degree of forty did not afford 
\Y%» ]> cnn a harbour lie would be forc't to buy one of Bal- 
temore or otherwise that their Blripps must Enter and Cleer 
in Maryland." 5 We are also further told that "the Said 
lfaiguo in a short tfnic after 1 this came to the Lord Pal- 
temore's house on Patuxcnt River where amongst other dis- 
course, the Lord Baltemorc askt the Said Hague whether 
he had not : taken Some observations att Elk Piver for his 
private satisfaction, which Haigue own'd, but with all pre- 

1 Hazard's Annals, p. C38 ; Pa. Arch., l>t Ser., Vol. I. p. 41. 

»\V. J. Peed,, Rooty]), p. 8. 

3 Hazard's Aun-als, p. .">7r». 

f&jfoarf £ WeMcotl's pldla., Vol I. p. «/|. 

MYima. Mag.; Vol. VI. p. 417. 



WiU&im JIakje. So 

tended that, (he Instrument was So Small that there could 
be no Certainty." 

Markham says that ift^uly, 1682, lie "sent Mr. Ilaig to 
Augustine JIarman's in hopes to a found [Baltimore's Com- 
missioners] there, but they were gon before he came there." 

On September 23d Markham learned that Baltimore was 
at Upland, and tells us that he "the next Morning wayted 
on my Lord, but his lordshipp haveing a great retcinue with 
him and every one something to say to me, I Desired Mr. 
JTaig lie would take notice what passed between us and write 
it downe, for I feared they would hardly give me soe much 
time as to doe it ; about Three dayes after his Lordship was 
gon I Desired Mr Haig to give me in writeing, what he bail 
noted passed at ye time afore said, the which he did as llol- 
loweth,' ' l and then gives Ilaig's notes. 

A new Instrument sent out by Penn ha.d arrived by this 
time, "but for want of some small glasses which the said 
Markham said ."\Y m ITaigue had taken away the instrument 
could not be made use of," Lord Baltimore tells us, and 
adds that he said' it would be necessary to go up the 
Delaware Kiver to see where 40° did cut said river, "but 
the said Markham by the advice of ITaigue (who seenfd to 
Governe more than Markham) declined that proposition 
giveing very Slight reasons for his refuse-all,'*- &c. 

A few days previous to the above interview llaige had 
been in Philadelphia, for on 19 th of 7 mo. 1G82, a certificate 
of certain lots in Philadelphia having been drawn before 
them, by purchasers, was issued by llaige and others. 3 

William Penn arrived at Xew Castle 27 Get.. 1*>S2. and 
the next day, appointed certain six persons as Justices for 
Xew Castle, whose Commission is preserved in the Land 
Olliee at Harrisburg, 4 and on the 29th he ordered a Court 
to be held November 2, but no mention is made by any his- 

HYnna. Ma-., Vol. VI., p. -\'^\ Mind., p. 4*0, 

5 Ibid., Vol. XIX. p. 4l'0; Hu/.ard's Annals, p. 505. 
1 Hazard's Annuls, p. 598 ; SelmrPd Del., Vol. I. p. 83; Smith's 
Delaware Co., Pa., p. l*g ; Pa. Aldt., U 8er., Vol. I. p. M. 



86 



mttkurt 7T*m 



torians, so far as known, of bis having vppohited a Council, 
though Janncy, ilazjinl. and Scharf ?eeni to indicate the 
exlstcorc of such n hotly. 

Markham had, upon his arrival the previous year, under 
the authority given in his Commission, appointed a Council 1 
of nine members, which is always referred to as Movkham's 
Council. 

The first elective Council met at Philadelphia March 10, 
1683, and is spoken of as the first Pfociwial Council ; I be- 
lieve Penn at or shortly after landing appointed a Council 
which should he called Paw's Council, of which "William 
Jlaige was a meinhcr. 

The Records of Xcw Castle Court ' after Penn's arrival 
open as follows : 2 

" Att a Cor 1 Held in the Towne of Xew Castle upon 
Delloware in the Name of 0' Sotivraiguc Lord Chakles the 
2 d by the Grace of Gv\) of England, Scotland, France & 
Ireland King defend' of the faith and by Commission and 
Appointment of 'William Penh, Esq r Proprict ry k Governo r 
of Pensilvania etc on Thursday the 2' 1 of Xoveml/ in y c 
35 th ycare of his May* Tfaighnc annoq Pom 1GS2. 

Tiic W lTonu™ Propriety'- 7 etc— 
CaptMVill Markham " 



Psent : 



Mayo r r J"nom Holms 
M r \Yiliiam Ilaigh 
M r 'John Simkock 
M r Thomas Brasic 



V of the Couneill 



Mr John Moll 

Mr Johannes Be ITaes 

Mr ."\Villiani Semphill 

XTr Arnohlua ])c Lagrange 

Mr John Cann 



Justices 
I of \- Peace 



'Duke of York'- Laws; p. 470; Hist. Del. Co., Pa., p. 129 j Uist 
Chester Co., Pa.; p. IS. 
1 Book C. 
3 Vide Hazard's Anna!., \k GOO; Sclutrfi Delaware, Vol I. p. 84, 



William Jlh/je. 87 

Samuel M. Janney, in his life of Penn, gives an imagi- 
native description of hi> journey to meet the Indians at 
Shackamaxon, where the " Great Treaty" under the elm tree 
13 supposed to have been made later in the month of No- 
vember, and says, " But sec ! a barge is approaching bearing 
at its masthead the broad pennant of the governor, the oars 
are plied with measured strokes, and near the helm sits 
"William Penn, attended by his council. Among them are 
Markham,his secretary, Holmes, Surveyor-General, Simcox, 
Haigue, Taylor and Pearson." l 

As Penn would in all likelihood have appointed at least 
as many members of his Council as he had authorized 
Markham to appoint, it is probable that at least two others 
than those mentioned above were so appointed. 

The only record of Markham's Council that is preserved 
is their, attestations upon entering ofriee.; 2 but even this is 
more than we have of Penn's Council; a search of the 
records in the Laud Oilice at Harrisburg did not disclose 
either a commission to, or the attestations of the members 
thereof. 

These two Councils were probably more of personal coun- 
cils to the Governors, than those that came after them, and i 
probably met at his order, rather than at stated times. J 

The Minutes of the Assembly held at Chester, December "l 

4-G, 1CS2, show that Committees were appointed to go to 
the Governor, but not to the Governor and Council, as in \ 

future Assemblies. From this it appears that this Council 
exercised no legislative function. 

The first elective Council met at Philadelphia on 10th 
clay of 1st mo. (March), 16S3, and William liaise was pres- 
ent as one of the members thereof from Philadelphia 
County. 3 His name appears in the minutes on various occa- 
sions as llaigee, llaigc, and Haigue. lie served on commit- 

1 P. 203. 

1 Pa. Archives, I a Sep., Vol. I. }>. 37 ; HUt fchestcr Co., Pa., j>. is. 
5 Col. Rec, Vol. I. p. 1; Duke of York's Laws, }». 4s:> - Pnmd'i 
Henna., Vol. I. p. 235. 



88 



William Haige. 



tecs to propose lulls reTatirig*to tc thc burning of woods and 
Marshes, to hove Chattel! marked, To erect Bounds of 

Hences,''' 1 "Utiles of County Courts, Bills of Exchange pro- 
tested, Possessions, Publique alTairs, Sailors Wracks, Act 
of Oblivion, Scoulds," 2 and " Fees of OiUcers belonging to 
y c Custom house.'' 3 

He was on several occasions appointed to convey messages 
to the Assembly, and was present 2 mo. 2d, 1688, when the 
"Great Charter''' was adopted, and signed same. 4 

On various occasions .lie requested leave of absence "for 
some time," either to go about his business or " to go about 
the Societies' business," and in eaeb case 5 received permission 
to be absent, and the minutes show that he was not often 
present after 3d mo., 1G33. 

lie was also a member of the Provincial Council in- 1684* 
as a representative of Philadelphia County, but again was 
frequently absent, having been present only a few times 
prior to 4th month. 

He was appointed one of a Committee of three "to draw 
up a Charter for Philadelphia to be made a Burrough con- 
sisting of a May 1 and six Aldermen," 7 and also on a Com- 
mittee to inspect the bills o\' Benj. Aerod, deceased, before, 
they are paid. He was present 8 mo. 25, 1GS4, the last day of 
the session, after which his name appears no more among 
the members. 

Subsequently, while the Council was not in session, and 
after he had probably removed to Past Jersey, the following 
entry appeal's under date of 5 mo. 24th, 1685. 

" V* Haigae Poquost y* Secret" that a hue & Cry from 
Past Jersie after a servant of Mr. John White's, March 1 at 
Xew York might have some force and authority to pass this 

l Col. Rec., Vol. I. j>. G. 

' lbi.1., p. 8. Mlml., ]). 11. 

* Ibid., p. l."> imi.IM. ;'J»ukeof York's Laws, p. 400. 

5 Col. Rec., Vol. r. pp. ;<, 0, 10, It. 

•Ibid., p. 30 ; Duke of York's Laws, |>. 40-i. 

'Col. Rec., Vol. I. p. G4: Pa. Ma-. Hist., Vol. XX. p. 120. 



William llmge. 89 

Province & Temtpryes ; the Secretary Indorsed it and Sealed 
it with y° Scale of y e Prnv^uce/.' l 

As previously stated, William llaige before leaving Eug- 
land had purchased 500 acres of land to be subsequently 
located ; 1 have found no record of any Patent for such land, 
aiid am not certain where it was located. Holmes 4 map shows 
a tract in Bristol Township, Bucks County, fronting on the 
Delaware Piver, in name of " W 01 Ilange/' \vlik*U adjoins the 
land of Christopher Taylor. The description of Christopher 
Taylor's land, as given in the '-Minutes of the Board of 
Property" shows- that it was next to land of * c TV 1 ' 1 lhiig." 

Davis, in giving the names of original settlers in Bristol 
Township, includes that of William Hauge, 3 but he probably 
meant by settlers, landowners^ and there is no evidence that 
Jlaige ever resided in Bucks County. 

Among the list of taxables within the Constabulary of 
the Town of Xew Castle, 1683, as shown by the records of 
New Castle Court, 4 appears the name of "William Ilaigh/ 
w r ho was assessed 4 $., 4 </., on " 400 Akres of Land ;" and 
the next year we find "William llaime" assessed for 43G 
acres ; 5 afterwards his name does not appear on the list. 
Whether or not the above two assessments were upon the 
same tract of land does not appear. The only deed recorded 
in Xew Castle County to William- Haige is one dated 4th 
clay of 2' 1 mo. (April), .1085, sometime after both the above 
assessments were made. It is for a tract called Buswick, on 
south side of Christiana Creek, containing P3G acres, and was 
from " Henry Vandenburgh of Xew Castle in the Territories 
of the Province of Pennsilvania, merchant," who for kt live 
and forty pounds current money" conveyed same to "Wil- 
liam ]lauge of the Province of EastXew Jersey gentleman." 
whose name is also spelt Hague in other parts of the deed."'"' 

l CVl. %c., Vol. I. p. 90, 

2 IV Archive, :M Scr., Vol. XIX. p. 233. 

3 Hist. T,iKk> Co., p., \tS, 

4 Liber 0, ful. Ml*; Sehurf's Hi>t. DeUwnro, Vol. I. p. 153. 
* Liber C, fol. *10. 
1 New Cnstlc Cd. Deed*, labor A, Xo. 1, fol. 100. 






00 



WflMth 'Hafai 



This deed was acknowledged in open Court April 24, 
1G85, when the names of the parties thereto arc given as 
ITenrik Varid Bqtgh and wilttam Ilauge." This land ap- 
pears to have remained in the family for some years, for the 
"Minutes of the Board of Property''' show that" in 1701, 
John Pichardson of Christiana Hundred requested leave to 
take up a small parcel of land on south, side of Christiana 
Creek adjoining the lands of "Widow Ilaige" and others. 2 

In addition to the above described tracts of land William 
Ilaige owned a lot in Philadelphia, between the Swamp, 
Second Street, and the Delaware front, laid out 27 of 4 mo., 
1GS4, under a warrant to William Ilaig, purchaser, dated 
the previous day, the Patent for which was recorded 9 mo. 
12th 16S4; 3 and* which was sold 2 Oct. 1G84 to Patrick Rob- 
inson by "William ITaig oifeo. of Philadelphia, merchant.''' 4 

'Whitehead tolls us that " when Pudyard suspended Groom 
from his offices of Surveyor-General and Receiver-General, he 
transferred them to "William Ilaige, who was among the 
earliest settlers, and apparently a man much respected. The 
death of Groom having prevented his reinstatement, Ilaige 
continued to perform the duties conferred upon him until 
the arrival of George ICeiih, in 1GS5.""' 

Whitehead is apparently in error as to the time of Ilaige's 
appointment, for it is stated in the Journal of the Governor 
and Couneil of Past Jersey, that when on August 30, 1GS-3, 
it was found that Samuel Groom had refused to survey certain 
lands on Paritan River, or to appoint any Deputy Surveyor 
to-do so, as ordered by the Couneil on Bl of G l mo. last, it 
was ordered by the Governor and Council that M Philip 
Wells bee Deputed and appoint A Deputy Surveyor of this 
Province" and "that hoc execute the Orders and Warr* of 
the Governor and Council] the said Sam" Groome p r emtorily 

f Recprcfc Now Castle Court, Lik>r C, ful. 232, 
■ Vtu Archives, :M Ser., Vol. XIX. p. *10. 
» rhilu. lk\\U t A. No. 1, p. r»c, 
4 Ibid., E, No. 1, [>. 4S. 
*ContrU>. to i:. J, nW„ p. 11. 



William Jlulm 



91 



refWdng the same in Contempt of tlris BourcV* 1 And De- 

cemher 1, 1GS3, it is further stated that Samuel Groom tltc 
late Surveyor General deceased had not fully executed a war- 
rant of survey in the bounds of Elizabeth Towne and that " it 
was resolved and Ordered that the Governor issue out Ilia 
wan* to Philip AVells the Deputy Surveyor to survey and lay 
out*' said land.- 

From the ahove entries it would appear that Rvdyard had 
appointed ^Vells and not Ilaige in place of Groome. 

It is known that - the proprietaries in England however 
did not approve of Eudyard's conduct in the matter in dis- 
pute between him and Groom and ordered the reinstate- 
ment of the latter, annulled all grants that had not been 
regularly surveved by .him and deemed it advisable to ap- 
]u)int another deputy Governor, permitting Rudyard to 
retain the ollice of secretary and register. " ,{ 

Gawen Laurie was then appointed Deputy Governor to 
succeed Rudyard, his commission being dated 27 July, 1GS3, 4 
and certain instructions, dated London, 20 (oino.) July, 1683, 
signed by "William Doekwra and other proprietaries, were 
given him ; in Art. XIX. of which it is stated that 5 " in respect 
S'Hiiud Groonn\ the younger, has shewn so great an Inclina- 
tion to sell his Father's Propriety, which he has already a 
Right to, and that thereby S'ulvx'1 Groome, the elder, may 
.either come back or be indisposed to serve in the lmploy- 
lnent of Surveyor General and Receiver of our Rents, 
therefore we do herewith send a Blank Commission for Sur- 
veyor General and another for General Receiver, to be filled 
up by him to such Persons as he shall find most proper upon 
the Place for that Use/' 

In February, 1083/4, Gawen Laurie arrived in East Jersey 
as Deputy Governor and brought with him his family, 6 con- 

•X. J. Archives, 1st Ser.. Vol. XIII. p. 105, : Ibid.. p. 111. 

3 X. J. IXUt. Coll., Vol. I. { >. DO; Cont. to E. J. Hist., p. 13. 
*X. J. Archives 1st Ser., Vol. J. p. 423 and -ISO. s [bid., p. IM, 
*X. J. }fi>t. Sue, Coll., Vol. I. pp. G and 120; X. J. Arch., Ut 
Ser., Vol. XIII. p. 120; Croud's UUt. Pa., Vol, I. p. 155. 



02 



WHUam Htvge 



sisting of his wile Mary, liis son James and his two daugh- 
ters Mary and Rebecca, and ei«*hi servants, according to Rev; 
E. D. Hatfield; who, however, also says that* William Ilaigc 

\yilh eight servants also accompanied him. 1 It is evident 
that lie is in error as to William Haige having accompanied 
Laurie from England, but doubtless Haige's wife and dau*ch- 
ter did so, and Uaige liimseit* probably then removed from 
Philadelphia to East Jersey, as h is name disappears from the 
records of Fcntisyl vault this year and appears prominently 
in those of Xew Jersey from this time on. 

Under the heading " The names of such Esons. as were 
imported into this Provinee and brought to bee 'Registered 
in the Secretary* books ci' Pecords are as flbllowes, Dated 
5 th Decemb. Anno Dona 1GS4" appears this entry "Upon 
Account of William Jlaiire, vizt. Marv liaise, liis wife: 
[Mary Peck, by Indentures for Hour years : Rebecca Ilaigc, 
his daughter: Benj* Curie, by Indenture untill hee be of 
the age of 21 : Kobin Hind, negro : Sambo, his wife, negro : 
Harry Mubuaber, negro : ftrances Camro, negro."* 

Laurie served as Deputy Governor until October, 1666, 
when lie surrendered the office to Lord Xeil Campbell and 
became one of his (Council, and so continued until his death, 
which occurred at Elizabeth! own in the autumn of 16S7. 3 
Upon his arrival in East Jersey, finding that Grooine was dead, 
he evidently appointed his son-in-law, William llaige, to suc- 
ceed to both the vacant offices, for East Jersey Pecords show 
two commissions for William llaige, signed by Governor l>".r- 
clay and dated 27th day of July, l(i83, one as Surveyor Gen- 
eral and the other as Receiver General, 4 and further show- 
that on April 14th, 1»IS-1, William llaige promised alle- 
giance to the King and to faithfully discharge the duties o\ 
each of the above-named oilices. On this last-named day 
llaige with consent of Gawen Laurie appointed Miles 

•Hi^.'of EliwiWth, N. J. f pp, 2lS and 221. 
■Bj J. IVols, Libci-A, fel. 151. 
5 N. J. Ili.-c. i\.!!., Vol I. [>. 210. 
• Liber C, fol. SO aiul 81. 



William Hafge. 9a 

llbrster (who afterwards married Rebecca Laurie) Deputy 
Surveyor and also bid Attorney, Deputy and substitute to 
transact the office of Receiver General. 1 These appoint- 
ments were probably rendered necessary by ITaigc's absence 
from the Province while serving as Councillor in Pennsyl- 
vania. 

On April 30, 1GS5, we find the following appointment, 
" I, William Ilaige of Elizabethtown, Essex Co., receiver 
generall of the Lords proprietors Quit Rents of this prov- 
ince of East Xew Jersey, in my absence have appointed 
Gawcn Laurie, Esq. our deputy Gov 1 to receive all Quit 
Rents & Arrears and to give Receipts" &c. 2 

"William Poekwra, who was appointed Receiver General 
and Treasurer July 6, 1G8S, on the death of William Haige, 3 
seems either to have forgotten that he signed the instructions 
to Laurie of duly 20.. 1683, heretofore alluded tc^ or to have 
subsequently entertained doubts as to the validity of com- 
missions signed in blank by Barclay in England and filled 
up in America, for upon the commission to Groom as Re- 
ceiver General he wrote the following : 

" Quae What blank commission G. L. had, for if he had no 
power to make a dep tf , his exceeding his power invalidates 
y e com'isrdon especially if y e patent was Signed & sealed here 
by y* Gov r kc. for after that thing he added or any material! 
alteration it makes it void. 

W m llaige never was concern'd to direct anytbingc 

& quae: what deputation was made by him to G. L. and 
where 

11 Consider y* G. L. beiiig dismist by publiquc order from 
y* propr. vndcr their province seafe." 4 

The Proprietaries in England appointed George Keith 
Surveyor General on the 81st duly, 1084,* but he did not 

1 Liter 0, fol. 82 and S3. 
>B. J. Deeds, LiUr A, u,\. 430. 
s Cont. to K. J. Hut., |». 15. 
. 4 N. J. Archives, 1st Series Vol. 1. p, 37$. 
5 E. J. Records, Book C, \\ Do. 



94 



WtUktfn Ilaigp. 



reach the province until die s}-*ftig of the following year. 
"Whitehead tells u* that 1 "on tlie 9* April he presented his 

credentials to the council of proprietors, but as the ollice to 
which he had been appointed was already filled hy William 
Ilaige, under a commission emanating from Dent. -Governor 
Kudyard,- they found themselves delicately situated, and 
postponed the consideration of Mr. Keith's commission 
until their next meeting," 

The Council at the time appointed were urged by Keith 
to decide in his favor, and they finally desired both of the 
applicants to appear before them on June 12th, when the 
office in consequence of the absence of Mr. Haige, and the 
inability, from some cause, of his deputy Miles Forster was 
declared vacant and Mr. Keith authorized to take the oaths 
and assume the duties ("Proprietary Minutes, A.I?, p. 6"), 
which he did that day in presence of Gawen Laurie," and 
on 13th 8mo., 1GS5, appointed John Rcid of Perth Airiboy 
to survey any lands in E. X. J. and report to him.' 1 

As both the commissions to HxuVe were . " for soe lom^; 
tynie as thou shalt well and faithfully behave thyselfe there- 
in," he was quite disappointed when Keith assumed the 
position of Surveyor General, and therefore the Proprietaries 
of East Xew Jersey conveyed to "William ltaigc of the 
towne of Amhoy Perth, Middlesex Co., late Surveyor Gen- 
eral of sd. province," a tract of 500 acres of land In Mon- 
mouth county known as Cooper's Xeck, as expressed in the 
patent dated Auirust-24, 16SG,' " in consequence of the sudden 

1 Coat, to E. J. Hist., p. 17. 

2 The Registrar of Board of E. J. Proprietors says that tlie Minutes of 
April 0, 1CS3, Boole I. p. G, state, "Then also was read a commission 
dated the 27th July J CS-J under the* scale of the province to William 
Haige for the Surveyor Gencmlls place still in force not voyded &c." 
As stated herein before this Commissiou came not from Kudyard but from 
Barclay through Laurie. 

>R 3. Coin's., Book C, p. 95. 
4 K. J. Patents, Jln'ok (', p. 1. 

5 K. J. Dewl*, J,ibet A, fol. 860 ; Loll. X. .). Hist. Soe., Vol. V. p. 
11. 



disappointment in feeing so quickly dispossesi of the oflice 
of Surveyor Gerierall." 

In 1C8G and again in 1088 we find William Haigc a 
m ember of the legislature, being a Deputy fron) Pertli Aia- 
boy, and as such he twice, in May, 1088, brought messages 
from the House of Deputies to the Council. 1 

This- is the last public service, that I have learned of 
William Haige having performed, and as. the Minutes of 
these sessions of the House of Deputies appear not to have . 
been published, I am unable to ascertain how prominent a 
part he took in the actions of that body. 

The exact date of his death is not known, but it must 
have been in the Summer of 1G88, for William Dockwra was 
appointed July 6, 1688, to succeed him as Receiver-General.' 

Sir Edmund Andros appointed "on Jany. 14, 1688/9, 
Myles fforster of-Amboy Perth, merchant, Administrator 
of the Estate of William Haigc of 'same place, deceased. In- 
testate;*' 2 and we find that by Indenture dated December '20, 
1G98, "Obadiah Ilak, late of the CiUv of Xew York in 
America, Merchant, Son k Heir of William Haig late o{ y* 
town of Amboy-perth*' iSco., conveyed to John Bowne of 
"Monmouth county, "Merchant, the 500 acres in said county 
called " Coopers Xeck" heretofore alluded to, stating that 
William Haig died intestate in 1GS8, and that the right to 
this land devolved legally unto said Obadiah Haig, who No- 
vember 5, 160S, deputed Miles Forster of the City of Xew 
York, Merchant, his attorney to sell this tract, and the latter 
signed the deed. 3 

Among the unrecorded wills of Burlington, X. J., 
preserved at Trenton, is the bond for "one Hundred 
pounds Currant money" given May 5, 1694, by Kit-hard 
Basnitt, merchant, and Janus Hill and Saniuell ffurnis. yeo- 
men, all of Burlington, which shows that on that day Rich- 
ard Lasnltt was admitted administrator oi the estate of 

"X. J. Archive*,' jU Series, Vol. XIII. rp..Uo, 176, ISO, 183. 
'E. JL Deeds, Liber !>,' fwL 2$. 
•Ibid., Liber F, fbt 6SS, &c. 



OG 



William IfnUji 



"William Haigh (fate of Philadelphia in the Province of 

Pennsilvania, Gout, deceased) within the said Province of 
West Jersey." 

There is nothing to indicate upon whose application this 
app.ointm.ent was made, and no distribution by the adminis- 
trator is shown. It does not appear from the records in 
Philadelphia that the estate of any "William Haigfac was ad- 
ministered upon there, but this appointment may have been 
made for the purpose of passing title to the two cottages and 
certain lots in Burlington purchased in 1682 by William 
Ilaige, and a resident of Burlington, rather than Ohadiah 
Ilaige or Miles Forstcr, who were non-residents, was ap- 
pointed as a matter of convenience; still the fact that at this 
late date his residence is given as Philadelphia, renders it 
uncertain that \)ie subject of this sketch was intended. 

The tract of land at " Coopers Xeek" was not the only one 
William Ilaige owned in East Jersey. The map of Perth 
Amboy, published by Whitehead, shows that he owned a 
large lot back of Gawcn Laurie's 20-acre tract on Raritan 
River, and that his wife, Mary Ilaige, had a lot in the town 
fronting on the Sound. This large lot was patented to Wil- 
liam Ilaige September 30, 1G86, as 13 acres in the bounds of 
the townc oIl Amboy-perth, 1 and he conveyed same to Myles 
fforster July 4, 1CS7, when the residence of both is given as 
Ainboy-perth.- 

There are two deeds dated August 10, 1 f>9G, one to Rooliph 
Vanderlinda and the other to Cornelius Cliristianse, both of 
Ilackensack, 3 which were made by "Miles fforster o( Citty 
of Xew Yorke Merchant and Rebecca his wife, Mary Havgf 
widdow »v Relict of William llaygv Merchant deceased and 
Ohadiah ItaVg his rMest sottc & Hcire at law of them the 
said William & Marie JIaygc." These deeds each convey a 
tract of 70C acres, which, had been patented to Gawcn Lau- 
rie August 17, IC8C, 

»fc J. lKea s Liber A. fol. 413. 

MMd., Liber P,, fol. 152. 

Ml.id., Liber V, fob. ill mid 413. 



William Haige. 



97 



Marv Haige owned other tracts of land which she also 

acquired through the rights of her iather, some of which 
were Patented to her as late as 1701, l but it is not necessary 
to allude to them any further. 

Oetoher 14, 1690, we find a deed stating that "I, Mary 
liaise widow of W? Haige deceased, daughter of Gawen 
Laurie, and sister of Rebecca flbrster wife of Myles il'orster 
of the Citty of Xew Yorke, merchant, being about to take a 
voyage to England, appoint my brother in law Miles iibrster 
my attorney/'- And it appears from deeds dated March- 10, 
1G07, and April 14, 1702, that, at those dates Mary Haige 
was living in London, 3 and it is believed that she did not 
return to America. 

JSo mention of her daughter Rebecca has been found after 
the registry of her arrival in 1G84, and it is uncertain 
whether she died in youth, married in America, or returned 
to England with her mother. 

Obadiah Haige apparently left the City of Xew York in 
1698, but it is not certain whether he also returned to Eng- 
land or settled elsewhere in America, and I have seen no 
evidence, that he married. 

The records of Perth Amboy and Avoodbridge meetings 
show that Miles Eorsfer and Rebecca Laurie were granted 
permission to marry 12 mo. 9th., 1686/7: but no mention of 
any llaiges, I am informed, is to be found in the Registers 
of Philadelphia, Burlington, Railway and Elainiield, Perth 
Amboy and "VToodbridge, or Xew York Monthly Meetings, 
and neither Gawen Laurie nor Miles Eorster mentioned any 
of William Haige's children in their wills. 

The fact that there was an interval of seven years between 
the births of Obadiah and Rebecca Haige, and that in the 
deeds dated August 10,1096, Obadiah is described as k - eldest 
sonc" of William llaige, raises the presumption that William 
Haige had one or more other sons, though o\' course the 



»E. J. Deeds, Liber C, fok 221, 24C, &< 

Mbid., Liber F, fol. tOS. 

• Ibid.', Libet G, felt. 03 tnd M,v.>. 

vol.. xx i v. — 7 



98 "William llmye. 

words " eldest sone" may have been simply a legal form, to 
show that there bein^ no elder boh, he was the heir. 

The records of Falls Mo. Mtg., Fa., show that 11 mo. 8 th , 
1700, "Francis Uingc of Mak-ucld Twp. Fucks Co. kus- 
bandman, and Pleassent late wife of Joseph MiHner, of same 
place' 7 were married at Falls fleeting, William Penu, William 
Biles, and other prominent residents of the Colony being wit- 
nesses thereto, but no persons named Haige, Laurie, or Forster 
siemed the certificate. Mrs. Ilaige bcius r in England, Gawen 
Laurie deceased, and Miles Forster and wife residing in 
Hew York, their absence has no bearing on the question of 
relationship. Xo conclusive evidence of Francis being a 
eon of William has been found, but as no other family of 
llaiges is known to have been in the Colonies at that time, 
and bis eldest daughter was named Rebecca, as was William 
Jlaige \s daughter, such relationship does not seem improb- 
able, Penn aud Biles both having been intimately associated 
with William IJaige. 

The records of Falls Mo. Mtg. show that Pleasant Milner 
was the daughter of Henry Pawlin, one o^ the early settlers 
of Pennsylvania, and married Joseph Milner, 5 mo. 10 th , 
1C90, at Pliineas Pemberton's house, and that after the 
death of Francis Jlaige she married George Clough, wid- 
ower, at Samuel Baker's House, mo. 13, 11']'?.. 

Francis Haige, or Hague, as his name was usually spelled, 
both forms being found in his marriage certificate, was an 
overseer of Falls Mo. Mtg., from which office he was re- 
leased 2 mo. 2nd, 1707. He does not poem to have pur- 
chased any land in Bucks County, the only deed to him 
which is recorded being for the ten acres 1 on which Buck- 
ingham Meeting House was built, he being one of the six 
trustees. 

Though described in his marriage certificate as of Bucks 
• County, he appears to have lived in Hopewell Township, Bur- 
lington County, N. J. There were very few Friends at that 
time in Hopewell, and most of them* belonged 16 Chester- 
1 Ducks County lK-cls Book 3, p. 250, 



William H*<jc. 00 

field Mo. Mtff., but a few who resiled on the river probably 
belonged to Falls Mo. Mtu\, as did Francis Hague. 

ITis children were Francis, /*., 1»-11-1701, who married 
Jane, </</>>. iff Thomas and Ann (Biles) Yardley; Rebecca, 
b. 1-19-1703; Pleasant, L 4-5-1705; Ilamiaji, b. 7-23- 
1707; and Isaac, b. 2-10-1711. 

The exact date of Francis Maine's death is unknown. The 
records of Falls Mo. Mtg. state that lie was buried 8-10- 
1711; perhaps this should be 8-16-1711, for bis will is 
dated October 13, 1711, and was probated March 25, 1712. l 
In it he is described as '< Frances Hagge of Hopewell Town- 
ship Borlingtou County,'' but signed his name as Frances 
JIage, and appointed his wife and son Francess Ids Execu- 
tors, and mentions his wife Pllesant, Ids daus. Rebecea and 
Pllesant, and his sons Frances and Isaek, the names of some 
beine* spelt Has and others Ila^e. 

His plantation seems to have bordered on the Delaware 
River and to have been divided by Jacob's Creek. lie left. 
the upper part, containing 500 acres, with the house and 
barn, to his son Frances; and the lower part, containing 340 
acres, to his son Isack. 

His sun Francis, though named as executor, was only 
ten years old, and from the irregular spelling of the family 
name and the duplication of letters in other names, it would 
appear that he either was quite ill when lie made his will, 
or bad an illiterate neighbor to prepare it for him. 

When his widow married George Clough, her residence 
is stated to have been Hopewell Township, Burlington 
County. 

The records of Flushing ^To. Mtg., Long Island, refer to 
the only other Haig that I have found in America at this 
time, bating that - 7 mo. 1st, 1702, at Flushing Mtg., William 
Haig, merchant, of Antigua, and Mary Masters of New York-, 
dan. of Mary Masters, were married.'' .Xo parentage <>f 
V\ illiam is given, anil no liaiges, Lauries, or Forstera signed 
the certificate. William and his bride went to Antigua, 
1 W. J. Wilis, Liber I, fi>!. 84* 



100 



William Ho'kjl 



whence, as stated in The Friend, 1 they removed to North 
Carolina. A son of Miles Forster also removed to the West 
Indies and settled in the island uf Barbadoes. 2 

The wills of Mary and William Ilaig, both dated Janu- 
ary 28, 1718, arc recorded in the office of the Secretary of 
State at Raleigh, X. G,; 3 the former having been probated 
January 20, 1718,0, and the latter March 2, 1718 ; from the 
latter it appears that their children were William, Mary, 
Sarah, and .Ann. 

Any evidence tending either to uphold or disprove the 
supposition that either Francis or William Haige was a son 
of William, will he gladly received. 

1 Vol. XXVIII. j». 325, Jauney's ijist. of Friends, Vol. III. p. 191. 

*N. J. Hist, &>c Coll., Vol. I. p. 127. 

•The N. C. Hist. & Oencal. Register, Vol. T. Xo. 1, p. 51. 



^ 



A lle<jl<tcr of Mhrrkyes (uxl Iwititn, 1802, 101 



A REGISTER OF MARRIAGES AXD DEATHS, 1802. 

(Continued from Vol. XXIII. page 520.) 

Ma JIR3 AGES. 

On December 24th 1801, in this city, by Rev. Dr. Green, John M. 
Bradford, of New York, to Abigail Field of tins city. 
• In this City on Dee. 31 lS0l/by Kev. Mr. Milledollar, Jesse March- 
ment to Elizabeth Maclain, both of Southwark. 

On Dec. 3 1st., by Rev. C. Potts, Robert Jackson to Phcbe Parker. 

By the Rev. Mr. Abercroinbie, Cant. William Taylor, of New York, 
to Esther daughter of Emanuel Ehinedollar of Southwark. 

On Jany 7th., by Bishop While, John Jones Esq., of Montgomery 
Co., to Rebecca Jones, daughter of the late Owen Jones Esq., of this 
city. 

In this City on Jany 9th., by Rev. Mr. Milledollar, Major James 
Ralph to Mrs. Florinda Rorger. 

On Jany. 7th., by Rev. Mr. Helmuth, Martin Reese to Elizabeth 
Beard. 

On the same day, John G. Harder, late of Germany, to Hannah 
Holmes. 

In this city Jany 21st, by Rev. Mr. Milledollar, Thomas Piekands to 
Miss Rebecca Jones. 

On Jany 10th by Rev. Slater Clay, John Ewing Esq. to Miss M. 
Johnson. 

On Jany 21st by Dishop White, Thomas Hope to Catherine Auncr. 
. Same evening by Rev. Mr. Car, Matthew Kelly to Eliza Hope. 

Same evening by Moses Kemper Esq. Abraham Menet to Rebecca 
Eamb, all of Springfield X. J. . ; 

Jn this city, on Feby 2d, by Rev. William Marshall, William Young 
of this city, to Rachel Anderson, daughter of Capt. I.N .Amh-r.<«^ of 
Trenton X. J. 

Same evening by Rev. Mr. Turner, Robert Hicks to Mrs. Margaret 
Star key. 

On 27th ujto.. by Joseph Hart F.-q. Mahlon Longstrelh of Rucks Co., 
Pa., to Eliza Wulley, daugtaor di' James Wallcy of New Jersey, 

On Teby 14, by Rev. Mr. Heli'en- line, Robert Mars to Elizabeth Hoot. 

On Feb. ll ,h by the Rev. Mr. Green, Mr. I". G. Garret of Delaware, 
to Miss Elizabeth Brook*, of tins city. 



102 A Reyhtcr of M<tirwjca and DMhs, 1802. 

On Feby ].T\ by the Rev. Mr. U>tiek, Mr. Israel Jones, to Miss 
Susannah Ml. 

Same clay, by the Rev. Mr. llelmuth, Mr. Adolph Fringbaus, merch- 
ant of Hamburgh, to Mrs. Susannah Lauffer, of this city. 

At Mr. Breton's phiee, on Fcby 17th, by the Rev. Mr. Smith, Mr. J). 
Cenas, to Miss Catharine Paulina Baker, both of this city. 

At Woo'lbury, (X.J.) on Fcby 12th by Jonathan Harker, Esq. Mr. 
William Marchon, aged sixty-seven years, to Miss Ann Walters, aged 
sixteen ! 

On Feby 7th by the Rev. Mr. Jones, Mr. John Trump, to Miss Rachel 
Whition, both of Lower Dublin Township. .1 

On Feby J 8th by the Rev. Mr. Smith, Mr. Isaac Adleman, to Miss 
Maria Thompson. 

In this City . . . On March 4th, by the Rt. Kev. Dr. White, Mr. 
Henry Xixon, to Mis.< Morris, daughter of Robert Morris, Esq. 

In this City On March ISlh by the Rev. Mr. Jones, Mr. John Evans, 
to Mrs. Sarah Parneut. ; 

In this City . . . On March 20th, by the Re\. Mr. Potts, Mr. Henry 
Bedinger, to Miss Cathrine Bo A wick. 

On March 2oth, by the Rev. Mr. Ustick, Mr. Stephen Clayton, to 
Miss Elizabeth Haydon. 

At New Kent County, (Vir.) Feb. 27, Mr. Michael Sherman, aged 07 
years and 4 days, to the amiable and accomplished Miss Eliza Poimk-xter, 
aged 14. 

In this City, on March 29th by the Rev. William Marshall, Mr. Rob- 
ert Craig, merchant, of Great Frit-tin, to Miss Agnes Young, daughter 
of William Young, v. holesalo stationer, of this city. 

On March Blst by the Rev. J. Abercrombie, Mr. Eiisha Smith, to 
Miss Sarah Paul, daughter of Mr. Jer. Paul. 

On April 1st at Friend's Meeting. Joseph Richardson, of Rucks 
County, to Mary Dixon, daughter of John Dixon, merchant. 
• On April Sth by the Rev. Dr. Rogers, Mr. Charles Jones, to Miss 
Mary Alluway, both of Lower Morion, Montgomery county. 

Same day at Friend- Meeting, Mr. Robert Smith, of Burlington, to 
Miss Mary Paeon, daughter of the late ;Jub Bacon of this city. 

Oc April I'fth, by the Rev. Mr. Jielfenstein, Mr. Michael Raker, to 
Miss Elizabeth Witt, both Of this city. 

: On April 11th, Mr. John John-ton, of the Northern Liberties, to 
Miss Fli/abcth Price of Chester county. 

On April 18th by the Rev. Mr. Blackwcll, Mr. John Dove, o( Port* 
mouth, (Fag.) to Mi- Eliza Mce, of this city.- 

Same day by the Rev. Mr. Turner, Mr. George Heialer, to Miss Ann 
Bcrro. 



A lirfj'Mcr of JLnria^s cfocl Death, ISO,?. 103 

On April !? Jib, by the Key. Ezckiyl CooiuHTj Mr. JUilph Smith, of this 
city, to Mrs. Catharine Justice, of the Northern Liberties. 

On April 22d, bv the Kev. Dr. rlelnrj fn, Mr. John L. Baker, to Miss 
Mehetabel l.o\ eland. 

On April 22d by the Rr. Jlev. W. White, Mr. W, Morrel, son of John 
Morrel, c-q. to Miss Loiira, daughter of Peter Lohra, esq. 

On April 15th by the Ik- v. Mr. Green, Mr. Wiii.iani Meudenhall, of 
Milesborough, Centre County, to Miss Eliza Kicmer, of (Chester County. 

On April 22d, by the Rev. Mr. Linn, Mr. Robert Ritchie, merchant 
of this city, to Miss Mary Keller, of New Jersey. 

On April 2-ith, by the Kev. Mr. Linn, Mr. Thomas Humphrey?, 
merchant, to Miss Eliza Irwinc. 

Same day, by the Rev, Mr. U.stick, Mr. Joseph Sutton, to Miss 
Hannah Hitter Tomlin. 

On May 2d by the Rev. Mr. Turner, Capt. diaries Eleonard le 
Barron, of llonfienr, in Normandy, to the amiable Miss Mary Weaver, 
of this city. 

At the Lazaretto, on May 2d, by the Kev. Dr. Collin, Thomas Smith, 
e-q. of Tinicum, to Miss Maria Miiil'ii, of this city. 

On May 4th, by the Kev. Dr. Rogers, Mr. John Ferguson, to Miss 
Rebecca Jones, daughter of Mr. David. Jones, of this city. 

On May Gth by the ' Kev. Mr. Ustick, Mr. William Hedges, to Miss 
Lydia Worrell. 

At Beusalem, Bucks County, by the Rev. Mr. Laznlcer, Mr. Joseph 
Willet, son of Col. Willet, of that place, to the amiable and accomplished 
Miss Miiguret Maria Van Horn, daughter of Col. Van Horn, of Maryland. 

On .May Dili by the Rev. Dr. Rogers, Mr. William Kiehers, a native 
Of Hamburgh, to Miss Mary Wallace, of this city. 

. On May 11th, by the Rt. Kev. Bishop White, Dr. Tobias Watkins, of 
Annapolis, Maryland, to Miss Mary Simpson, daughter of George Simp- 
ton, Esq. of this city. 

On May 12th, at Friend's Meeting, in Pine street, Mr. Timothy 
Abbott, to Miss Rebecca Howard, both of this city. 

On May 13th, by the Kev. Ashbel Green, Mr. George lielmboldt, jun. 
to Miss Sarah Maxin. 

On May 12th., at Friend.-' Meeting. Buckingham, Mr. John Paxon, 
of fjeiwalem, to Miss Sally Pickering, daughter of Jonathan Pickering, 
of Sulelniry. 

On May l.°,th by the Rev. Henry llelmuth, Mr. George Pepper, to 
Mte Heckle, daughter of Mr. Ltovitl Seckle, all of this city. 

On May 3th, by Mr. Na.ellicke, K-p Mr. Jehu Ryan, to Mis.. Elim 
3iick<*nu, both of Attlehoitftigh, Buck- Co. 
.On Mav 9th at the Citv of IVashiii'xton. the Hon. John P. Vanne>s, 



104 A Mtgitftr of ifarriages ond tketlte, ISO 3. 

Member of Congress, from the state of Now York, to Miss Marcia Burns 
of that city. 

On May 17th, at Xew-rBnraswiek, Stephen Van Renssalacr, Esq. late 
Lieut. Gov. of the state of New Voir:, to Miss Cornelia Patterson, only 
daughter of the Hon. "William Patterson, one of the Judge* of the 
Supreme Court of the United States. 

In this city, on May 21st by the Kev. Mr. Turner, Mr. Richard 
Harding, to Miss Maria Sheridan. 

On May 25th, by the Kev. Mr. Cotton, Mr. James Dover, to Miss 
Elizabeth JIart, all of Philadelphia County. 

On May 27th by the Rev. John Greer, Dr. Samuel Anderson, of 
Chester, (Delaware County) to Mrs. Sarah Moore, of Marcus Hook. 

On May 29th by the Kev. Dr. Rogers, Mr. Benjamin Harrison, to 
Miss Margaret Bickley, both of this city. 

Same day, by the Kev. Mr. Turner, Mr. David Tomson, to the amiable 
Mrs. Ann George, both of this city. 

On June 1st. by the Rev. John Ewing, of Chesterville, at the seat of 
Israel Ellicot, Esq. \\'m. Ewh'ijr, Esq, to Miss M. Ellieot. 

On May 20th by the Kev. Mr. Milledolar, Mr. Joseph Barker, to 
Miss Ann Barclay, daughter of Mr. Samuel Barclay, Hatter of South- 
ward 

On June 5th by the Kev. J>r. Green, Mr. Silas E. Weir, .Merchant, 
to Miss Elizabeth Barnhill, both of this city. 

In this City, on June loth Mr. Francis Kenshaw, to Miss Frances 
Budden. 

New York, Mr. Satmiel . Palmer, of Philadelphia, to Miss Elizabeth 
Allaire. 

On June 19th by the Kev. Mr. Helfenstein, Mr. Alexander Stewart, 
Merchant, to Miss Eliza May, daughter of Mr. Adam May, all of this 
city. 

On June 22d, by the Kev. Mr. Janeway, Mr. Robert Kurkkard, to 
Miss Sarah Sharp, both of this city. 

At .Newport, Mr. John A. Shaw, to Mi>s Elizabeth Muckmore. 

UJohn had happiness before, 

I>y marriage he h*i gaind Much-iv.orc. 

On July Sd by the Kev. Mr. Annan, Capt. Peter Bell, to M Us Han- 
nah Eorder, both of Southwark. 

Same day, by the Kev. Mr. Ustiek, Mr. Lawrence Drown, to Mi« 
Kcbceca Webb, both of this city. 

On July 10th by -the Kev. Oeorjrc Put:-, Mr. Samuel Park, to Misa 
Christiana Johnson, both of this thy. 

On July 11th by the Rev. Thomas IN tick, Mr. Jacob Warren, to Miss 
Elizabeth Taylor. 



A Ryttcr of Mnrnn/jrs and Deaths, JS02. 105 

On July 1 Otli by Alderman Wharton, "Walter Franklin, K>q. Attorney 
and Counsellor at Law, to Miss Ann EaiHu, daughter ot' the late Mr. 
James Kmlin. 

Same day, by the Tiev. Mr. Ahererombie, Mr. Samuel Evans, to Miss 
Hannah Old field, both of this city. 

On July 17th by the Rev. Mr. Smith, Mr. Samuel Cox, to Miss Lucy 
Eden, both of this city. 

On July 21st by the Rev. Mr. Pott*, Mr. AVilliam F. M'Laucrhlin, 
printer, of this city, to Miss Sarah Fromberger, daughter of John Front- 
berger, Esq. of Germantown. 

At Staten Island, Mr. Journey, ay-ed SO, to Miss Cole aged 60. 

A fellow-trav'ler, and a friend, 

Is found towards the Journey's end. 

On July 24th by Kobert Wharton Esq. Mr. Klinken Johnson, of Ger- 
mantown, to Miss Lydiii Tybout, daughter of Andrew Tybout, of this 
city. 

Oji July 27th by Peter Drown, Esq. Mr. George Shiras of Mount 
Holly, to the amible Miss Elizabeth Munns, daughter of Thomas Munns, 
innkeeper of this city. 

On July 27th by the Rev. Dr. Rogers, Mr. John Cummins, to Mrs. 
Cathrine Kelchnc, both of this city. 

On July 20th by the Kev. Thomas Ustick, Mr. John Thaw, to Mis* 
Eliza Thomas, both of this city. 

On Sept. 2lst by the Rev. Mr. Carr, Mr. John KYley, to Miss Maria 
Keehoe, all of this city. 

. On Sept. 22d, at Springfield, (X. J.) Mr. Anthony Taylor, merchant, 
of this city, to Miss Mary Xewbold, daughter of the late Caleb Xewbold, 
of Lurlington County, (N. J.) 

At Frankfoid, on Oct. 5th, by the Rev. Mr. Janeway, Mr. Benjamin 
Stille, to Miss Ann IX Silver, both of this city. 

•On Oct. 21st Mr. John Lisle; juii, merchant of this City, to Miss 
Margaret Mark, daughter of Mr. John Mark, of Jefferson County, 
Virginia. 

At Albany, Mr. Henry Weaver, to Miss Margaret Ruby. 

The web that he wove caught her heart, 

'Twus Hymen bid Henry to smile, 
'Twrw Cupid that pointed the dart. 

And a Ruby that crowned all hi.- toil. 

On Oct. IStU, by the Rev. Dr. Blackwll, Mr. Benjamin Brilton, of 
this city, to Mi-s Rebecca fcfuiith o\' Tinicum. 

On Oct. 18th by the Kev. Mr. Turner, Capt.' William Whitehead, to 
Miss Rebecca Keemlile, both of Southwarb. 



100 A JRccjUir of H'*rrl*gc* ; md Vcaths, IS02. 

On Oct. fist, by the Hevi 3fr. Smith, Mr. Ri chard Lampley, to the 
amiable Mis.^ Jane Newton, both of this city.. 

On Oct. 21st by the Rev. Mr. Abeierombie, Dr. Nicolas Wyneoopj 
of Newton, Buck- County, to Mi-v. .Sarah Campbell, daughter of George 
Campbell, esq. of ihl- city. * 

On Oct. ISth by the Rev; Mr. Creor, Mr. George Maxwell, of Marple 
Township, Del. Co. to Miss Elizabeth Cunningham, of the same place. 

On Oct. 24th by the Rev. Dr. Collin, Dr. Joseph Dill, of this city, 
to the amiable Miss Sarah dayman, of Kaston, Pennsylvania. 

On Oct. 2S in the county of Newcastle, by the Rev. Mr. Wallace, 
Doct. George Logan, of S. Carolina, to Miss Margaret White Poalk, of 
Delaware. J 

On Nov. 2d by the Rev. Mr. Linn, Mr. Jacob Lippincott, of Glouces- 

ter county, New Jersey, to Miss Jane Ann Sykes, of Charleston, S. C. \ 

On Nov. Cth Mr. Charles Mercier, to Miss Rebpcca Summers, both of 
... j 

this city. 

On Nov. 9th by Samuel Bcnezet, esq. Mr. Jacob Waterman, mer- 
chant, of Philadelphia county, to Miss Mary Wimer, of Bensalcm, Bucks 
County. 

On Nov. 13th by George Btidd, esq ; Mr. Andrew Jackson, to Miss 
Mary Tnnes, both of this City. 

On Nov. 21st by the Rev. Mr. Milledoler, Mr. John Vallance, to 
Miss Margaret Pratt, both of this city. 

On Nov. 2uth by the Rev. Mr. Abercrombie, Mr. Alexander J. Mil- 
ler, merchant, to Miss Anna Maria Bass, daughter of the late Dr. Bass, 
of this city. 

On Nov. 25th by the Rev. Mr. Ustick, Mr. Henry Parmar, to Miss 
Jane Lllison, both of Concord, Delaware. 

.On Nov. 27th by Bishop White, Mr. John Harrison, to Miss Lydia 
Lcib, both of this city. • 

On Nov. 80th by the Rev. Mr. Milledoler, Dr. Zaehariah Ifomuan, 
of Ulster county, state of New- York to Miss Mary Johns, of Southwark. 

On Nov. 30th by the Rev. Mr. Greer, Mr. Andrew Lindsey, esq. to 
Miss Christiana Vanlecr, both of Delaware County. 

On Nov. JJftth by the Rev. Mr. Abercrombie, lVetor Shaw, of Ger- 
inantown, to Mrs. Anne Sayre, of this city. 

On Dec. 2d by the Re\*. Mr. Abefcrombie, Mr. John Bioren, printer, 
of this city, to Miss Hannah Barker. 

On Dec. 4th. by the Rev. Mr. HeUenstine, Mr. Rudolph Neff, to 
Miss Margaret Rugan, liuth of this city. 

On Dee. 5th. at R< e Mill, "near Trenton, by the Rev, Dr. Armstrong, 
Mr. Manuel Eyre, jun. of this city, to Mis.- Juliet. Phillips, daughter of 
Mr. Ralph Phillips of that place. 



A Jvfi'sUr of JUarrktjfea and Deaths, 1SQ2. ' 107 

On Dec. 7th liy the Rev. Dr. Green, Capt. Jonas Warren, to Mr*. 
Martha Smith, <>f this city. 

Same day, by the Rev. Philip Milledoler, Mr. Thomas Peacon, mer- 
chant, to the amiable Miss Susannah Sadler, both of this city. 

On Dec. 8th by the Rev. Mr. Abererombie, Mr. Patrick Carson, to 
the amiable Mis»s Elizabeth Moiiroy, both of this city. 

Same day, by the Rev. Mr. Cooper, Mr. Ebvid Brown, of Lancaster, 
to the amiable Miss Mary Peek of the Northern Liberties. 

On Dee. loth, by the Rev. Thomas l^tick, Mr. John Herts, to Mis* 
Ruth Prownc, both of this city. 

O/i Dec. 9th by Michael Hilligas, esq. Mr. Ezra Plains, to MUs Ann 
Johns, both of Chester County. 

On Dec. PSth by the Eev. Mr. Abercrombie, Mr. John C. Otto to 
Miss Eliza Tod, both of this City. 

(To be continued.) 



108 Ship Registers for tic Part of ThZadctplia, 172G-1775. 






D =h 






& Ph 



II 






.2 

S fee 2 



O C 



~ £. -3 «S }H " 



y jp jf« j£! ^ ■ ^o 



b *- •- J- -^ " 5 ^ 






~ r 



O h 5 



H DQ ■ . < N ^ H »4 ^ 



X' 



o 
to 

o 





<-> 






fe 


■5 


-4J 


*a 






to 


to 






t_ 


"t< 






►H 


" 


3C 


Ci 


—■ 1 


CI 






^ 


M 


c 










3Q 


X 


ia 


i- 




CI 



X 



e* 




















*rs 


• ZJ 


X 


rs 


*C 












o 




— » 




MB 


§' 


In 


~> 






•— 1 


X 



Ship Registers for the Port of PhikidetphUf, 17.26-1775, 109 



ci 


CO 


© 
o 

CI 


I 







fc 









o s 


| 


.5 


d 


£L, 


Is 




-3 


.2- o 


<D 


ci 


t: 53 


"3 


*-' 






O 


O 


Ph 



5 r c 



O 3 



X 



' g j£ J§ g -r 



& *S 15 o £ t» ^ 

C Ph g fc £ % 2 

I § -3 ^ TS ^ £ 

ci c3 g P ^ ^- 



-a ra ra 



o 


c 




O 


a 




o 


o 
















a. 

eg 


-5 s 


9 


ct, v « 


c o 




C3 ^ l ^ 


-- r 


S 



| g j 2 .-£ 3 ' 5 § fc x 8 * 1 



*£ J 



Ui C 



\ 



^ 


a 


y 


s 


S3 


o 


« 


fc 


>. 


s 






C 


Zi 
















> 



.5 





bo 




>■ 




c 








c 




'ZJ 




c 




O 


fi 


rt 




, 










£ 


O 


^ 


*r 










> 


c 


3 


r~ 


6 


~ 


M i 


cu 


c 


> "l 


C 










JS 


o 




^g 


w 


c/: 




$ 


c> 


t- 




53 


CI 


»-« 







> 



7. 



110 Strip Registers for ifo. Port'of FhMMphki, 1720-17 



hi 
1 fcS= 



X 






■a J u 






? o Z 



'2 o a c 



3 



o 

p 

H 
x 

3 

2 



' ^ r - ^ ^ ZZ — -~* -^. .^-' ~ id rK *© /5 JS? 2 O 

.= ~ u ~ S £ '"c s •- # ^ .2 P3 - " »SI Ph 

"^ £ x -5 "^ 5 p-3 S ^ ^ 



^■\ r. ^> 

f-r t-< r— \ 



*X C5 d 



la 

8 
2 
o 



to 



•-a ^ hnh ^ © £ 






x 



"2 .rf 



O ^« 



Skip JRegistm for the Port of 'Philadelphia, 1726-1775. Ill 



o 


o 




o 


o 


c>« 


sd C ? 




<tf 


Ca 

<i .2 






V-. 




O 




1 §\? 


s 




. o 




S5 l-» Is 

g p ^ 


o 
O 


£ 


§ £ 


% 


"^ > E 


c 


o 


.S cJ 




Taker 
Prj 
of 


o 


o 

c 


5 .^ 





, 


o 






«- 






c: 






> 






*• 






ci 












o 






q 






c: 






o 


-2 


£ 


p 


*§ 


r- ( 


c 


'5 


"o 


H 


r s3 


. tcs . 


or. 
O 


C* 




rz< 


rz« 


> 


,q 


.£3 


53 


Ph 


Ph 


►3 



I 



r* 




2 








■5? 








c 




'« 


SB 


O 

c 


3;§ 


3 


© 






Ei 




V; 


'£ 


*s 


>. 


r. . 


-r 




w k: 


o 




t- 








o 






o 


o 






•tj ^ 


ftH 

o 


3 


p 


5* 


, ~ 


c./ 




£2 


F* 


"7^ 


T3 


,jy 


O 


o o 


pq 

S 
o 

H 


6 
p 
c 


*-* 

r. 

C 


GO 


O 


In 

1^ 




© 




2 


o 
*9 












e 




























© 



















o 



a: 

o 



•8 5 § 



£* © _r ,° © 



«8 



o 
© 



3 

•© 

> 

3 





c 




B 




to 




c 










o 


E 


e 


n2 


Ci 


► > . 


^a 


r~ 


49 


«9 






to 


.£P 






M 


"E 


»~i 


M 



c 
3 



c 



> 


• > 


£_ 


o 


o 


c 


X, 


^ 


^ 



u 
C 



112 Ship Iliffsters for the Port of Pkilaxklplm, 17 20-1770, 






S £ fe -« • 



TJ1 c 

t IT- 



^. ~ DQ Z 5 ~* 



o E: C 



»-s •£ 



^g J-^ Cd O ^ ~ 



Pu ^ 



x= 



c 






H 




pa 




O 


v. 


fe 


E g 






h 


** c^ 


b— < 


-. v7 






H 


tc 




Ih 


pf 


Q 


O 


c 


r^ 




s 




K 




H 




X 








C 


aj _j 


K 




*v» 


»» o 



K 



- > 

c 



rr-J »** T- r- '~ i r "" 1 tf © ^ "" ~ 



^ p: r: ^ . — £ "cj "S- * 






s s rt o o ci 

P »-) >~5 ^ t-j ^ 



CA. 



C/_ 



W 



K 



•— <M 



>. 



^. 



Ship Registers for the Port of Phifaddphia, 17QG-1775. 113 



cJ 




c5 


« 


cJ 












13 

ft 


eJ 


A 


ja 


^z! 


H< 


ft 


ft 


ft 






*o> 


"cJ 


-B 




j5 




sS 


let 


to 


£ 


13 


r3 


p* 


PQ 


P 


Ph 


.£< 







fl 




•g 


a. 




■*-> 


o 


o 


M 


cr. 


PM 


^ 




r£3 




CJ 


C 


cJ 


C 


». 


*-> 

fo 





a 



T. 


ft 


o 




'"d 


ju 


Pj 


C 


"o 


tj 


'X 


c 


£ 


ri 


~i 


*g 




13 


^H 


c 


P^ 


W 


"o 


►3 


C 


o 




o 


o 




P 





** ^ 3 -5 



K « 



















J9 
















.£ 














0. 


El 














13 














*4 


o 












u 


ft 

r— « 

O 


y. 


.5 
4) 


'--', 


• d 


c 


© 


o 

-y. 


93 
mr-t 

to 


cr. 
g 


O 


a 
o 

v. 
r. 

o 


15 


o .2 


CO 


CO ~ 


12) 


^ 




2 


^. 




r—< 


b4 


O 
O 






*^i 


3 a 


"S 


1? r3 


M 


Pi 


rt 


Ph 




.s 


T3 


ri 


3 


a 


H< 


£ o 








© 


P- 


3 


3 
£ 


J- 


rQ 




Hi 


o 


o 
H 


o 


o a 
M < 



o 



r- 


«H 






C< 


O 


t- 


fc 


£ 


,_ 


< 




c 


izz 










c 


^>- 


H5 


r~ 



o 



o 

ft 

< 



b 

rt 

,ft 

CO 



CO 

ft 
o 
c 

CO 



CO 



rs 


s 


"i-. 


a 


PQ 


Ch 




ft 


*-- 




o 


A 


o 


QQ 


o 


ft 


^=3 




o 




CQ 


CO 


o' 


o 


CO 


CD 



& 

n 

H< 
I 

a 

CO 



ft 

< 



V01.. XXIV.- 



11-1 Ship Ittr/itkrs for (he Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 





r o 




CO 




£> 






I.' 1 * 




CI 




** 






M 




1 1 

> si 




> 

© 






r 




6 "o 




/^ 






- QB 


<D 


„ 




d 






ii -j-^ 


»-< 






O 




"B 






•— X 








^> • 


5 JS 


cs 


o 




5 




.5 

1 

1 




p 

a 
o 


o o 
o 73 


© 


co 

"7. 


■j. 


1. 


"Si 


d 


O g 


r: 


ci 


© 


VO 




O . 


. © 


i' 


"o 


►*3 




Q 




CO 




O 




I 














1 

to 














<N 














t^ 















H 



o 

s 

o 
w 

p 



CL' 



^ 5 



o 

ex 


P. 


rs 


(« 


'c 


c 


pq 


^ 




d 


rt 


O 






a 


© 










en 


x 


"a 


© 






r— i 
















ei 


^ 
















P 


W 




d 
o 


6 


S-- 

"© 




5 

to 

«-< 

o 


d 

O 

c | * 


p 

»— i 


6 


S3 


© 

arj 
3 


■+-5 




•"C3 -i-a 

c qe 


© O 3 

5 £ o 


w 




r © 

3 


in. 


"7 


r o 




■7; 


3 ^3 73 


p 




v< 


C 


.0 




q 


>-0 •■• C 






o 




JO 




— 


as £ -° 


o 


















H 










o 








C3 










^ 









O 




s 












o 
8 


P 


■?> 


o 

ta 








ff5 






o 



e5 
OS 3 



c3 

ftl 



« 0*8 



fc* 



U2 






> 



% 



& 
60 

O 



02 

a, 

CO 



•sill g I «S -1 a g 

D H £, v-i tj ."- -~ ^ ^ ^ «^ 
e ' « ° f S 2 > S « .9 6 






H ^ «- 



P 



O 



3 

« 


O 

P 


g 


X 


c: 


a 


t> 


o 


r* 


H 



c 

«*, 5 ^ o 

S g 3 -° 



1 

o 



•a 



a 
o 



x 



0* 
< 






to 






-a 


1 


C3 


3 






6 


'c 


o 
►0 


c' 




b 




*3 


g 

6 




c 
el 
|*5 




QQ 

c 


1- 

4> 

O 

o 

,0 


3 


t-3 




*».. 


c 


U 


Cfi 


IS1 




>—> 


CO 


CO 





ex 




o 


^ 


t' 


C-3 


r-< 




»— t 


•^ 


^ 




t> 




o 


© 


© 


B 




£3 


c 




W— ! 


zz 




JJ 


g 


a 


r^. 


»-3 




•^ 


^ 


^ 



Ship Registers for the Fori of Philadefphm, 1726-1775. 1 15 






t- P-. 



o 




o 










CI 


*^ 




1 


«-. 










,i 


g< 


c 


C- 


r; 


r^J 






















Efi 


H 


x* 


■^ 


~ 


Jl 






g 


QQ 




T" 


'"*■"' 


—~ 
















X 






P 


V- 


5 


Ph 


~5 






c; 




,t- 














to 




£ 




s 


P 










>. 










BC 

R 

O 


«... 

o 

M 


r. 




C< 


? 


| 


1 


^ 


•—4 


■** 


.1: 


X 


"T 


D 


£ 



»-< CO 



—. t>. _ 



3 
O 
^ 



-a .3 
P X 1 



<R~3 >> 



X ~ 



5 ^ 






°s 



6 - 



» r=? » £. 



5 tj £?> .S 

3 ri£ ►-< ^ 

l*|f 






.5 <— < ~ 

3 »-s 



x ^ 



o 
to 

o 
o 

c 



£ 


H 


o 


O 


J3 


c 






o 


« 


« 


£-t 


-a ^ 


r ^ 






~i? 


o* 


i ^ 


/. 


o 


o 


Ha 


»"9 



o 



X 



C 



<-. 


^J 






*~ I 


y 






_ 


3 


»gj 


© . 


X" 


«~-N 


C 


Eo 






,o 


1-. 


3 


O 

o 


In 


o 
a 

C 1 


£< 


cu 


Ch 


t; 








C 


-C 


•^3 


jj 




X 


X 


X 


X 


Ifl 


'.o 


o 


O 


C^l 


<M 






ti 


o 


>» 


>» 


























■"* 


Hj 


Hj 


►— s 



o 

I 

x 



f. 


r: 




r^-. ' 


'O 




%4 


r—\ 




i5 


C 


o 


O 


ct 


fe 






t_, 




c 




a 


< 


C 1 


f , 


*■* 


2 


c 


tc 








o 




u- 


X 


X 


H 


C5 


Cs 


- 1 



— :/. 



lie 



Notes and Queries. 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 

Kote£, 

Items of News, Bethlehem, July, 1755. — Early in the morning of 
July 19, 1755, Mr. Sail!, who had 'left Philadelphia the day before, 
reached Bethlehem, Pennsylvania,. <f/> route to Albany, New York, with 
dispatches for General Shirley from the Council, informing- him of the 
defeat of Braddnck's army near Fort Duquesne, In virtue of the follow- 
ing letter, a fresh' mount .and a guicL: were provided by the Moravians : 

"To the Moravians at Bethlehem and Nazareth, " 
• "Gentlemen, 
"The hearer is sent by the Council, in the absence of the Governor, 
with dispatches of the utmost consequence to General Shirley at Albany. 
I earnestly entreat you will furnish him with a good horse, if lie wants 
one, and a guide to show the aearest way. li' he arrives time enough, it 
may be of infinite service to his Majesty* anus, and if you assist, it will 



be much for vour honour. 

Pikj apa.. 
IS July 176-j. 



Gentlemen, 

Your humble Servant, 

Richakp Pete it?, 

by order of the Council. 



The day following, an express reached Bctlikbem from Frederick Town- 
ship, bringing word of the death of Henry Antes, and preparations were 
immediately made to attend his funeral. The services were conducted by 
Bishop A. G. Spang.nbcrg and Rev. A. Boinkc, and it w:ts estimated 
that si: 



. r i — i 

nging word of the death of Henry Ames, and preparat 
rely made to attend his funeral. The services were coin 
. A. G. Spaiigrnberg and Rev. A. Boinke, and it writs ^ 
that six hundred persona were present. Two days later, Justice of the 
Peace Daniel Brodhcad, of Dansbury (now Monroe County), died at the 
>Burn>ide Mansion, near Bethlehem, from a boil on the neck. He had 
come to Bethlehem for treatment by Dr. J. M. Otto, a skilful surgeon 
and physician, but the case had been delayed too long. His funeral was 
attended by Justices Craig and YVillson, and a large concourse of people 
from the vicinity. A widow, live sons, and one daughter survived him. 



Drvrox Genealogical Notes. — "William Dunton, of Philadelphia, 
was married to Marv Stndlur, Mav 11, 177:?, and had LsMie : 
JaJhob, b. Aug. 14. 177.^. 
TJtowai, b. Dec. 11, 177-1. 
William, b. May. IS, 177G. 
tS-'rah, b. May 14. 177s ; m d. Francis Hunt. 
Geartfe, b. Ati_'. 23, 17.su. 
Ktisiktk, b. Marcli 31, 1783. 
M'irijirit/fj, b. Feb. :?*►, 17*.~». 
AuatKn, b. Oct, 22, 17*7. 
M rrm, b. April 4. 17l"». 
IWtiam, b. Doc. IS, 1702. 
Anna, b. Nov. 'JS, 1794. 



Notes and Queries. 117 

Jacob, :=on of William and Mary Dunton, md. first Bridget , and 

had. i-sue : 

William, b. Toby. 28, 179G. 
John, b. June 24, 1797. 
Jacob, b. April 27, lSUOl 
Isaac, b. May 2G, 1S02. 

Married second, Ann MeCarty, Oct. 2, 1S0G, and bad issue: 
Anna Maria, b. June 8, 1807. 
Abraham, b. Julv 29, 1808. 
Wilson, b. March 30, 1812. 

George, son of William and Mary Dunton, md. Mary , and bad 

issue : 

John Lewis, b. Feby. 10, 1807 ; md. Susan B. Pierson, 1830. 

Sarah Ann, b. Sept. 14, 1808 ; md. John E. Murray, 1828. 

V/illiam Washington, b. Dec. 0, 1810. 

Mary Amanda, b. May 22, 1813. 

Margaret '■ S'.rsan, b. Aug. 11, 1815; md. Joseph H. Gregory. 



Joseph F., b. .March 13, 181S 
Susannah Elizabeth, b. March 13, 1818 
Amanda Amelia, b. May 9, 1821. 



twins. 



Copy of Warrant for Arrest of John Roberts for High 
Treason, 1778. — 

Philada. SS. 

To Tin: Sheriff of the City and County of Philadelphia or 
any of hjs Deputies oh to any Coxstabie. 

WHEREAS John Roberts, miller, now or late of the Township of Lower 
Merion is this Day charged before me James Young l>q. one of the 
Justices &c, on the Oaths of Michael .Smith, yeoman, and Mary his 
wife, of said Township with High Treason, by aiding and assisting the 
Enemies of this State and of the United States of .America and joining 
their armies sit Philadelphia in the month of December last. 

[SEAL] These are therefore to command you in the behalf of this 
Commonwealth forwith to apprehend the said John Roberts and convey 
him to the Jail of this County and the Keeper ot' said Jail is hereby 
requested to receive into his Custody the !3ody of said John Roberts and 
him safely to keep till he be delivered to the due course of the Law. 

Given undo;- my hand and seal this :'7th. day of July 177S. 

James Vouxo. 

Gerhard Gene AT.oorcAL Notes. — Frederick Gerhard, horn March 
2d, 171!, at Lanjsenselbot, Hesse Darmstadt, was married January 23, 
1737, to Kliz.abeth Fisher. In tlie Summer of 1739, tliey sailed from 
Rotterdam on the ship Samuel, Captain Kuirh Percy, for Philadelphia, 
where they made their homo. Mrs. Ocrhartl died there, leaving: a s«on, 
Peter, born October 23, 17^7. $oon after the death of bin wife, Fred- 
erick Gerhard removed to Heidelberg Township, l'erk- County, whvare, 
February 11, 174 ! \ he n arried a willow, who>0 maiden name had been 
Barbara Riejrer, and with her had five sons and four daughters. 

Conrad* son of Frederick and ttarhnra Gerhard, was burn November 
22, 17-10. In 1768, he married Rachel, daughter of Isaac Marten* and 



118 Notes and Queries. 

i 

Rachel (Bogart) Ys-elstein, born in Bucks County, June S, 1741. She 
died at Phii.'idelphia, May Ct, 1801. They had is.-ue : 

Rachel, b. Janr. 15, 1*70. 

Elizabeth, b. March 2, 1772. 

miliar, b. April 10, 1774. , 

Mary, b. Feby. 4, 177G. I 

joiUj b. Oct. 17, 1778. . I 

Eteanora, b. Nov. 17, 1780. 

57iOwa-s, b. Jany. 31, 1782. ■ ] 

After the death of his wife, Conrad Gerhard married second, Elizabeth 
Jungman, November 9, 1802. 3 

William, son of Conrad and Rachel Gerhard, b. April 10, 1774, .j 

married Sarah Wood, Oct. G, 1S<>8, and had issue : 

William Wood, b. July 23, 1800. 

Benjamin, b. June 3, 1811. 

Thomas, b. Oct. 2, 1813. 

Louisa, b. Sept. 25, 1810. 

Duxgan Genealogical Notes, from Bible in possession of Ethel 
Duval, Philadelphia, — 

Thomas Dun-an, was born the lf>th day of March, 1738. 

Elizabeth Duncran, was born the 22d. day of January, 1740. 

Sarah Dungan, was born the 25th day Of August, 1742. 

[Torn] Dungan, was born the 3rd. day of March, 1745. 

John Dungan, was burn the 12th day of March, 1747. 

[Torn] Dungan, was born the 24th of September 1749. 

William Dungan, son of Thomas Duucjan and Elizabeth his wife, born 
17 May 1700. 

Thomas Duncan, son of Thomas and Elizabeth Dungan, was born 
23rd March 1794. 

PiiiCE-SHUTE-CoL*uTNi:Y-CoorEF:-RrDOLrH Genealogical Notes, 
from JJible in possession of Mrs. Edward Esher. — 

Mary Price the Daughter Of Joseph and Sarah Price, was Born Sun- 
day July y e 3 rl 1743, about a Quarter after Six of the Clock. 

The 27 Day of 7 mouth 1755, about 10 miniis after 10, it being the 
first Day of the weak, was bom Sammuel Shute Son of Ilenrv and Mary 
Shute. 

John Shute, the son of Henry & Mary Shute, was born the S* day of 
July 1758. 

Sarah Shute, the Daughter of Henry Shute was born April the 3rd 
day in 17 GO. 

Hannah nli'M Anne Shute. the Daughter of Henry and Mary Shute, 
was born January 18, 17»*>2. 

Elizabeth Shute, the Daughter of Henry and Mary Shute, was born 
the 18ih day of February 170-1. 

Mary Courtney, the Daughter of Hercules ami Mary Courtney, was 
born the 24* day of March 1 7 1 J 7 . 

George Cooper and Elizabeth Shute were married Oct. 3, 17S0, by 
W m White, hector of Chri.-t Church & St. Peters. 



Notes o.ad Queries. 119 



John Rudolph was Married to Elizabeth Shute, by the Ref M r 

Kenton, the 10th. dny of September i. 71/4, at $t Mary's Church, on 
Fourth Street Philadejphfta. 

"Thomas Griffiths his Kogke." — The following interesting in- 
scription is copied verbatim et literatim from a fly- leaf in a rare and 
curious book entitled : 

"The HISTORY of all EELtGIOKS 

In the "World : From the Creation 
Down to this preftwt Time." 



In Two parts 



By WILLIAM TURNER, M.A. 



LOXDOX, printed for John DustOSf, 
at the Jiaceu in JcwcH-jtrcet, 1G95, $ vo 

"Thomas Griffiths his Booke, 
God give liiiii Grace theirin to loock, 
Not only looek but understand, 

Laming is hater than irons & land, 
When Rous and land is gou & spent, 
Larnincr is most excelent." 



G. P. P 



Record of the Okmsby Family. — 

1. George Or m-by, was born August 1, 1773. 

2. Sarah Ormsbv. was born Apratt 11, 1777. 
8. John Orrnsby, was bom Oct. 3 d 1780. 

4. Catharine Ormsby, was horn Aug. 27, 1701. 

5. William Ormsbv, was born Feb. 18, 1794. 

6. Edward Ormsbv, and Rachel, was horn January 2, 1797. 

7. Eleanor Ormd>y, was born June 1, 1709. 

8. Henry Ornish}', was bom February IS, 1 SOI. 

9. Margaret Ormsbv, wa- born Aug. 4, 1802. 

G, F. P. 

Revised Rules of Court, Philadelphia County. — Whcaraa 
many disorder- have hlthertwo beeu Committed In the Courts of this 
County Partly through the Ignorance and partly through the Negligence 
of- -Otherwi.-c. (we hope) well Meaning Persons-, which if Continued in 
without Remcdle may be a ineancs to bring M:\jestraeie (which is god^ 
Ordinance) and- Court of Justice hi to ^corue tn«l Contempt. 

The Court of Justices have theurfore thought t'.tt lor Prevention of the 
like f>r the future to make- these Iliiie* of Court Hollowing *.V additnall 
ruh-< toy* former order of CoutaseH . 

Hirst that the high Shreif or bis htwfuH and approved of deputy, Clark 
of the Court. <v Crycr, aud.att lea>t one of the Townc Constables (by 
tu tilt's) d<»e Constantly attend the Court ati the preihe houres of fitting 
and that thay depart not the Ctuirt without leave and Penalty of a tine 

2Uy that ikmj pson that is not [medially Concerned In the Dusinefa In 
agitation psumc to !?pcak in Court w '•'• nut leave \\\v\ paine of a tine ; 



120 Notes and Queries. 

3'ly that plaiutif- defendants and all other prions Speak dyreetly to the 
poynt in Question and thai tbay put In their picas Jn writing (this being 
a Court of Record) and that thay forbear Reflections and Recriminations 
Either on the Court Jurys or on One A another rind' Penally of a fine 

4 tb ly that all lines Imposed u\">i\ any Per.-on for totall absence untimely 
coming to Court or breach or' the>e or Other Rules of Court already made 
then or hearai'ier to be Made shall be ievyed on the Party's Goods and 
Chattclls by way of Distress and that the Executions thearfore be signed 
Iu Open Court before the Riseing of such a Court that Imposed the line. 

The Glooms of Ligoxikr. — A song by an officer of the Pennsylvania 
regiment stationed at Ligonier (formerly Lovaihanning) in the winter 
of 1759. 

From climes deformed with frost severe, 

From mountains wrapt in snow, 
Where surly winter rules the year, 

And howling tempests blow : ] 



To you, whose modest charms improve 

The lightning of your eyes ; 
Still conscious of the force of love, ^ 

We soldieis waft our siuhs. i 

Though fortune, calls us here, beyond 

Each gay engaging view, 
Yet, pleased, we do our duty, fond 

To serve our prince and you. 



Our prince, to merit ever just, 

Rewards the soldier's toil, 
You too will deign, we humbly trust, 

To pay us with a smile. 

While happy thus the scene shall shift, 
We've nothing more to ask ; 

Honour, the king's peculiar gift, 
And love, your tender task. 



\ 

< 
\ 

Of these possefit, at fate we'll smile, / i 

Defy the >uii\ year, 
Honour and love shall reconcile 

The glooms of Liyonicr. 

Letters of Peletiah Webster, Sr., and Peletiah Webster, Jr. 

\ 

PIULAPF.LFUL4 leScptcm. 1777. 

Dear Ruthy, 

. . . Our armies have bepun to fight l>elow ; there is very much de- 
pending on whieh side the Victory may turn ; we are all big with 
Anxiety cc flatter ourselves that Our prospects of sueeess are now much 
greater than they have he. n since the War first commenced. People 
vary much in their Opinion, some think that I.nrd Howe will set to the 
City, hut I believe very few e.\ee|H th.-c that \\ isli fur it. W'e most 
generally think that he will get a much more severe Drubbing than e\er 

i 



Notes and Queries, 



121 



be had. We have men enough & they are sufficiently spirited. God 
only knows what the event may lie! . . . Do»*t know when I shall 
come to see you, but not before the fate of the City is Determined ; ex- 
pect to go to Cam]) in a dat or two a* a volunteer, so that if Howe gets 
here lie wont find me. Uuthy I am almost tired of this World — may 
you live to see better time* is the sincere prayer of 

Your mo.-t affectionate brother, 

P Webster Jr. 



Friday, 27 Faby 

Dear Altiiy, 

. . . Send by next oppor l - v one paper Tobacco and one clean ca] 
Euclid's Klements, a small book which stands in my book-ease. 
not yet made acquainted with the Cause of my confinement nor 
guess at the Reason of it. Am pretty well ; my leg is almost wt 
room and company are agreeable. 

We had one night the Company of -Gen. Irvine, Col. Coats, 
Giles and Capt. Swift, but they were removed to y p New Goal since 
have not heard of them . . . 

I am &c 

P. 



. 177$. 

>, also 

I am 
can I 

11, my 

Major 
which 



W. 



Monday, March 9, 177.S. 

Dear Althy, 

I much want to see you and your Sister but this habitation is so 
gloomy ev full of horrible objects that it will only increase your trouble 
to come here, besides I am not sure that you can be admitted. Most 
people that apply are denyed, therefore I rather ehuse to forego the 
pleasure of seeing you than subject you to the pains & perhaps mortifica- 
tions of coming to see me. 

I eat no meat & drink no spirits or wine, except bitters now & then ; 
a Tankard full of Chocolate will any time last me two days. Keep up 
vour fortitude, presence of mind in Distress lightens afllietions much . . . 

P. Webster. 



Letter of Key. Francis Alison to Benjamin Alison, his 
Nephew. — 

Phi lad* Fob. y 2*> 1777. 

Dear Lenj a • / 

I received yours by M r . Alexander Hunter, and am glad that you keep 
y r Health, & are safe as yet from y" dangers of War. I think y' some- 
times it is mens honor and duty to commit themselves to Cod & to shun 
no danger, & this is y° duty of Generals Si leaders, but was neither Mr. 
Hunters duty nor yours ; & to be in >" field in an Exigasemcwt, & to 
continue there, after it Mas Judged to be duty to retreat, is rather fool- 
hardiness, than Courage. 1 complain that many battalion- have neither 
a Doctor nor a surireon to take care ofthehr sick & wounded : 1 complain 
y* men of no great skill are sfrmct hues appointed to iiil these Important 
otTues; and I complain that when men of skill are appointed tficy will 
do other bushier, ov neyrleet their own place & post. You know v 1 your 
duty was to be in a. known place, to receive and help the wounded ; this 
was to do more puhlick service than any private or volunteer could do in 
an engagement. 1 l>eg that while you stay in y* army, tliat no false 



0-0 



1778, 8 mo: II, By Cash of Catherine Wiltberger for 1 
year's Kent of the George Taverne, (the English 
had all the Stable & part of house) . . £65 

1770, 2 mo: 12, By I>o. of Ruth Fugles for a Quarter's. 
Rent of Woo-!', a House (no rent while the English 
were here & long after) . „ 

The Estate of Mr. John ImIcm To Dr. Ifcnj'n Rush 
1 77 o Feb. To sundry medicines & attendance administered 
to Child & Inoculation of Child .... 
177C Sept. To Do. in consultation with Dr. Kuhn . 

The Estate of Jvhu /Mr** dec*d to Caleb Jones. 
17G7 - 10 mo: l"2-To Buck rum «& £taya .... 

M making a tfutc of Cloaths 
170S-f> mo. 8 — " makins a pair breeches . 
1760-10 mo. 2'J M making a Coat .... 

The Estate of Jvhn Lvlau to John Howard Df : 

1770 ^ept'r 4 To a mahogany Cot'iii,* t\>r hi>> Wife . . £5,0,0 



3 15 





Dr. 




£8- 0- 
6-14- 


-0 
-0 


£0, 3 

I, s 
0, 6 
0,15 


6 

o 
o 





122 Nok$ and Queries. 

J 

notions of Courage or Bravery may ever tempt y' 1 to neglect y* duty of a 
surgeon, a brave Uuiu may bleed to death while you are not to be f >und 
for his relieC \Ve have no news.- Yonr mother <.<: Bob are still at Fort 
Augusta. Anny •& Bob have both bad long & severe sickness & y e Doctor 
without Medicines, or (?) in relcivc tbein', they are mending. I have 
some notion of .Removing either to y" l*Y>rt or to Muusey to settle for life, 
for •provisions & ail things are eo dear that we cannot live on our salaries 
and we have no hopes of getting them Enlarged, on one or the other of 
these places I can, by farming, have y c necessaries of life while I live, & 
1 cannot get more nor so much, as thing- now go in FhiUul*. Besides I 
expect that this city will be y* seat of war next summer, & tlut y c College 
must be broken up as nreil as. in Jerseys; & If this should happen, this 
new Country will be my only retreat. If you or any of the oiiieers be 
here about y c 20'^ of 'Maieli, & if the wether be good, & if they <>r you 
will then go to Fort Amru-ta,* I had some notion then to go back, but i 

cannot venture without company ; then I may determine what I will do. 
Boh Alison lay at my house three weeks in a low state, by y* sickness he 
got in Prison at New York, but my brother John came for him, & he is 
gone home. Many of these miserable captives have died, in this city, & 
many of them in New York, & many have died on their way home. 
Cozen Robert lives from day to day on hopes, <k Promises, but nothing 
is yet done for him as fir as 1 know. 1 fear General Washington will 
not have his army complected, when all y c militia have served their time. 
Mens wages I am told i; now three pounds to encourage them to Enlist. 
I expect you in town about y c 10 : '' or fifteenth of March ; The family as 
far as 1 know are well. . I Pray you to serve God, & prepare for a better 
state ; you are in y e way of danger & unfit to die. I wish you a long, 
sober & Religious life, & am with sincere affection yours a 

Fka : Alison. 

Some Items fbom the Account of the Execittoes of John* 
Lukexs, Deceased.- 



N*>fC8 a))d Q"crk.< 



123 



Pension Notice, \',[m. — 

WAii on i( 1: of. THE united states. 

Information is hereby given to all the Invalid Pensioners of the United 
State- - , residing within the States respectively, that one moiety of thoir 
annual pension, commencini: on the tilth day of March last, will he paid 
at the place* and by the persons herein after mentioned, on the fifth day 
of March ensuing, and that the >econd moiety of the said annual pension 
will be paid at the same places and by the same persons, on the fifth day 
of June ensuing. 

Maces. 



The States, 



New Hampshire, Portsmouth., 

Massachusetts, Boston, 

Rhode Island, Providence, 

Connecticut, New London, 

New York, Kew York, 

New Jersey, Perth Amboy, 

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 

Delaware, Wilmington, 

Maryland, Baltimore, 

Virginia, B. Hundred, 

North Carolina, Hillsborough, 

South Carolina, Charleston, 

Georgia, Savannah, 
January the 2-Sth, 1700. 

By order of the /'resident of the 



and persons by nhom the 
pension will be paid. 
Joseph Whipple. 
Benjamin Lincoln. 
Jeremiah Oiiiey. 
Jedidiah Huntington. 
John Lamb. 
John Hoisted'. 
Sharp Dehmey. 
George Bush. 
Otho H. William.-. 
William Heti.. 
John Haywood. 
George Abbott Hall. 
John Habersham. 



Untied Staff*. 

]{. Knox, 
Secretary for ike Department of War, 

Value or a Nj:ot:o Slave in Pennsylvania, in Continental 
currency, — 

Pail«ADA 10* Juny. ITirl. 

Mr. Richard Keyes 

Bo' of Thomas Jones. 
A Negro man by the name of .rack, which was purchased of Col. 
Ephraim Blaine, Commissary General of lhirchnses, aged about Nine- 
teen years, which said Blaine warranted sound & free From any Impedi- 
ments cY. State Charges, to said Jones &c, and upon said Conditions is 
now Delivered up to Mr. Keyes Price Ten Thousand Pounds Cent 1 
Currency. Thomas Jones. 



Deaths of America*" In T£RCst, announced in The Pocket Magazine^ 
London, January to December, 179-3. — 

[•Iinuary.~] — "At Merlon, after a long and painful illness, Mrs. 
Lackington, wife of Mr. Lackington, bookseller, Finsbury Square." 
[London,] 

[J/<?jyA.]- — "In Meirion &junre, Dublin, Amos Strettel Esq', one of 
the Directors of the LSank of UnglamL" 

"At Terry, near All<»a, >i' William F.r-!cinc, who had received his 
Majesty's commission t-> co to Ireland as commander-in-chief." 

[.l/'/v7.] — "At his lodjringrs in Maddux Street, L'apt. Payne Galway, 
nephew to Sir Ralph Payne, only son of Mr. Galway of Xorfolk, and 



124 Notes and Queries. 

Aid-du-Camp to Ocm-ral .Slopcr. He had been to the Masquerade at the 
Optra Hqusq ; and, in aUvui}>ting to subdue the lianu-.- occasioned by 
his candle's having caught the bed-curtain-, he was so schockingly burnt 
that he died at five o'clock the next morning." 

[Auf}wt.~\ — "On his way to Prighthelm-tone, Peter Livius Esq r late 
Chief Justice of Canada."" II. 

An Interesting Bill. — 

The Exc ,rs to the Estate of Mr. Axdlew Kennedy, Merclr, 

To James Pearson, Dr. 

1795 

March lG Ui For Surveying the House and Lot bought of Robert 
Morris Esq* in tenure of the President of the U. 

States $2.00 

20 th For a resurvey and delineation of the lot on which 
the said House stands & the East lot as per Ace* 
delivered $3.00 



$5.00 



Phi lad a August 10^ 1S00 

James Pearson, 



Su rvctjor. 

Fl'neral or Colonel Pofu:rt Macaw, of the Pennsylvania 
Continental Line. — From The Carlisle Gazette and the Western Repos- 
itory of Knowledge, for January 13, 171*0, we copy the account of the 
burial of Colonel Robert Magaw, who commanded the Fifth Pennsylvania 
Battalion when Fort Washington was captured by Sir William Howe, 
November 10, 177G. He was appointed colonel of the Fifth Pennsyl- 
vania Line ; but, owing to his exchange not being effected until October 
25, 1780, he was prevented from taking command, and retired from the 
service January 1, 17S1. On January 7, 1700, he died fit Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania, and his remains were interred in Meeting-House Spring 
Cemetery. 

. u Gji Wednesday evening last, the remains of the late Robert Magaw 
Esq. was entered at the burial place near this town. The funeral was 
perhaps the most respectable ever seen here. The following was the 
order of procession. 

Troop of Horse dismounted, 
Music, • 
Corps of Infantry, lately commanded by Col. Magaw, 
Clergy, 
Physicians 
The Body. Pall supported by six gentlemen, 
late officers of the American Army 
Trustees and Faculty of Dickinson College, 
Justices of the Court o\' Common Plea*, 
Attorneys at Law- 
Students of Dickinson College, 
Officers of the County, and Principal Officers 
of the Itoroinrh of Carlisle, 
Citizen* 
Minute guns were tired by the Artillery during the Procession, At the 
grave a pathetic discourse »\u« delivered by the Rev, I>r. Davidson. 
Three vollies from the hifuutrv. closed the scene." 



Notes and Queries. 125 

School Bills, 180i>-3.— 

YOLTNG LADIES' ACAI/.KMV OF PHILADELPHIA. 

Msirch 2i, 1802 
D. C. 
For the Tuition of Miijs R. Risk from Dec. 21st to this day . V 5 

Quills. and Ink 50 

Copy' Books . . . ... . . , . . 10 

Ciphering Books ......... 50 

$6.10 

Received Payment 

James A. Iskal. 

Mk. Kennedy, 

To Mrs. Mallon Dr. 
Oct. 19. 1803. To 3 Months Tuition & Board of Miss 
McCoy £70 fe ann . 
" 3 months tuition in Music 
" . do Embroidery 

r< do Washing 

" use of Instruments & tuning . . ii> 

" Paper Quills & Ink ... 11 3 

tc Camb* for Sleeves & piece of tape . 3 4 

" Cash making a stuff & white dress . 18 9 

" 82£ yds Shinielle. % b\ d 



£17 


in • 




5 


1 


3 


2 


5 




2 


5 
15 






11 


3 




3 


4 




IS 


9 


1 


17 


9 




17 


C 


1 


17 


6 




2 


6 




3 


9 




12 


5 




S 


5 




1 


10$ 




5 


~'\ 


£85 


1G . 


11 



" 3| vds Dimity .... 17 C 

" 5 yds Muslin @ 7 r G . ' 

" body lining .... 

*' do for frock 

" making frock, tape & thread . 

" pair white silk gloves 

ie a pencil .... 

M hair cutting & soap 



Part of a Letter of Jamf.s Logan to Letitia Aubrey, 170S- -1 0. — 

The following letter was found among some old papers at the home of 
Mrs. Owen Jones, at Wynne\yooJ. It is without dale, is neither signed 
nor addressed, and has on it, apparently in the handwriting of Mary 
Jones, this memorandum : "An old letter supposed to fee from James 
Logan to Letitia Aubrey, which was sent by Maria Logan to her friend, 
Mar>- Jones." The date is probably about 1708-10. 

Howard Williams Lloyd. 

"As it was no small pleasure tome to see a line from thy hand by 
Ed: Shippen, so it was a no less disturbance to find by it h<»w much I 
have Suffered in'thy thoughts since our last parting. for which 1 can by 
no means imagine the occasion. My style it seems bis been ><> unhappy 
as to displease. I assure thee 1 never affected any thing particular in it, 
and if at any time when tltmi was sinsrle, I took the accustomed fre 
that, had not been blamed bt !'«>re. Vet since thy marriage I find (upon 
examination of all tiiecopics of my let!'* that I have by me) tint one 
syllable but what might become a piece of gravity of twice my age nor 



126 Notts and Queries. 

any cxpres-Jon but what the plainest might renwmn!»ly u c e. Give mo 
leave to .-ay that whatever right I may h:ive to thetu, I have never yet 
beeii observed to use hard words or a fleet any speech but tvhat is com- 
mon, and therefore cannot but ye more admire all the severity oi" thy 
censure. 

"But there is another efcarre that comes much more home, for the 
form of words is but a trifle, and that is thy belief of my being in with 
pome very deceitful people here who are prejudiced against thee that I 
am altered in my friendship to thee, and further that thou hast ^ccn my 
name among a list of those that speak sleightinglv of thy husband, as to 
the first part I ean boldly s-iiy that if I am altered at all in any respect it 
is but very little, & that I hope not for the worst, and therefore if thou 
ever knew me thou must own the deceitful are none of my companions.' 
Our friendship I once Imped would never alter, and on my side it has 
not begun to do so yet, nor ever shall while 1 can have room to exercise 
it, and as to the latter I shall only say thy, as it was never my business, 
so I never concerned myself in it. Thy displeasure with me at New 
Castle at parting, upon another occasion was a sufficient lesson to me not 
to meddle in atiairs of that nature. Indeed Mrs Lctitia it has never yet 
been my temper to lessen any person without a very just occasion. I 
have never had cause hitherto, nor I hope ever shall to speak the least 
unkind syllable that way. ami without cause I am sure I shall never 
begin with any man. But one piece of justice I must claim & desire 
that is to know what worthy person that was that put my name in that 
list among the detractors. 

"What 1 request is due to me and then if 1 do not prove the party, 
be who they will, as arrant a hypocrite & false deceitful pickthank as 
any of the Province when the very worst that thou canst imagine in it I 
will readily fall under the imputation & not speak one syllable in my 
own defence. This is down right barbarity in my accuser & J admit 
thou coulds't suffer it to enter thy thought 1 eould be guilty of the base- 
ness, but pray give me their name, and if I cannot do myself justice I 
shall crave it of another. 

"As to thy complaint concerning the Estate hero, thou seems one 
fully acquainted with what J have in charge from thy father and others 
in desiring me to make returns directly to thy husband & then 1 cannot 
send them thou sayot to the wrong person. But the orders thai I now 
have are as follows. 

"Thy father I understand has mortgaged an Estate in Kent or Sussex 
to thy husband for the payment of two thousand pounds on thy aect' 
out of thy lands (or otherwise^ in this Province and obliged himself to 
pay £120 the interest of it yearly till that sum be paid or proportion- 
i.bly as it is paid otf. To enable thy father to have this money rai-ed ' 
thy husband and thee have joyntjy made over your whole Estate by 
joint deed to certain TriMcu*, via., thy ITnvle Wharley Goldney & Swal- 
denfiel in <v to all thy Manor on Schuylkill all the town totfcs appurten- 
ant, which Trustee** have appointed Saml Carp iirtcr ami me their Attor- 
neys to dispose of their lands :>n>\ have ordered the Kifects to be remitted 
directly to them, and for the interest of thy money thy father and hus- 
band have joyncd in' a pnwer of attorney to R*d Hill ami thy brother R. 
Thomas, appointed them to receive of me here, so that both principal 
and interest is ordered from me into Other hand- to whom I must remit! 
and pay it, and to no other. 



Notes and Queries. 127 

"I wi>b I conk! as well justify myself in applying some of thy 
money viz between •'* & 400 to thy lather's Use the first summer A her 
you went over 'tis now his Last, as well as my great trouble, but 1 will 
retrieve it a* soon as possible, tlio the miserable poor condition of the 
country for want of money to what it was when thou was here makes it 
exceeding difficult, there lie* 500 lis more in goud secure hands upon 
intere.-t but such as can not yet raise the money. When I can find waves 
to get it in and return it I have many reason* to urge me on not to be 
backward & thou may assure thy self I shall not, for I shall strain t<> my 
utmost, but you that abound thus with plenty can scarce judge of our. 
circumstances, especially how hard a thing it is to sell land now for 
money. Thy brother has sold all his Manor on Schuylkill for less than 
12 lis p ceii! only for the sake of money, and yet must trust all most one 
half 1 6 months & the rest 12 Mo'ths except one hundred pounds that has 
ree'd. 

Thy father's bleeding circumstances require the speediest supplies. 
Yet seeing he is so very hard tied, both for his ease and thy satisfaction 
my first endeavours shall be to clear off that incumbrance which were 
money as it had been amongst us would not be difficult. What thou 
canst doe further to facilitate the matter it will very much behoove thee 
to contribute what is in thy power. I spoke to llees Thomas about the 
money for the ero>>-, but he says he will stay for his brother's answer to 
his letter for lie thought he was to be called on for it. Kees is really an 
honest man & deserves favour. 

"And now 1 think I have answered thy whole letter the unkiudest 
thing T ever saw come from thy hands. Tho I think in my own breast 
I deserved it as little as ever. Time was when thou thought me true if 
thou art deceived now, thou wast then, for as J said before 1 am not 
changed. J know not whether thou wilt think thy brother so or not, by 
whom this comes, many have thought him so about 3 weeks ago, when 
*he put on his sword with a resolution to wear it ever hereafter. The 
country has been too unkind to him, especially our Xew Corporation, for 
they. have treated him barbarously and he resents it, as highly, but I 
will leave it to himself to be more particular. 1 thank thee for the con- 
tinuance of thy good wishes with my ancient acquaintances & good f 'r 
A. S. but I have received an entire balk in all my inclinations of that 
kind, of w'ch thou wilt hear more from thy brother. A. S. was still 
right well she thanks thee for thy lett' and would gladly have wrote but 
could find . . . ." 

IftcpUes. 

Sons ofr Washington. — (Pknna. Mag., Vol. XXIII., p. 412.) The 

following notes, answering this query, were prepared by Mr. .Stewart 

Culm, of the University of Pennsylvania. 
"February 22, 1810. The First and Second City Troops celebrated 
Washington's Birthday at ttarnum's Hotel. On that day, ab<>, the Society 
of the Sons of Washington dined at Renshaw's Man-ion House. The 
members wore their badge*, containing an excellent miniature li'-cen.e-s. 
of Washington set in gold and accompanied by .suit able inscriptions. 
The president wa* James Milnor; vice-presidents, Jonathan 11. Smith 
and Samuel I\ I'-radlbr i ; secretary, Robert S. Stevenson ; ami tria.-urer, 
Samuel Kealf. Civilities were olso exchanged bctw ecu the Soeitrtv ami the 



128 



Notes o.nd Queries, 



First and Second Troops and Independent Volunteers, all cf which wore 
dining on tiic ~_d of February. Tbe founding of tie Society seems to 
date from this time. Long accounts of the dinner appear in the dsiily 
papers of the day. We road font over the president was suspended an 
elegant emblematic painting, the centre of which was embellished with 
a striking bu*t of Washington in transparency, surrounded with a scroll, 
containing tin. following passages from his Farewell Address: 'The 
name of American must always exalt the just pride of* Patriotism.' 
The decorations of the room were by Mr. Kobbins, of tire theatre. In 
the course of the evening the full-length transparency of Washington 
was fixed to the front: of the Mansion House, to the gratification of a 
large concourse of people. .The final -toast of the evening 'The last 
Prayer of Washington for hi.-> Country,' was drank standing. During 
the evening a deputation o^ three gentlemen waited On Captain Price's 
Third Troop of City Cavalry,' and after felicitating them on the joyous 
occasion whieh they were mutually celebrating, drank 'The Volunteer 
Companies of Horse of the City of Philadelphia, — in peace its greatest 
ornament, in war its beat defense. 3 The Troop afterwards reciprocated 
.tire compliment by deputing three of its members to wait on the com- 
pany, and on their behalf gave the following toast : 'The Hero whose 
nativity we arc celebrating, — First in peace, first in war, and first in 
the hearts of tpfs countrymen.' By the President, — 'The Society of 
American Republicans, — Washington their guide, they cannot err.' 



1815. The Sons of Washington celebrated the 22d 



of February at the Man-ion House. James Milner was president; 
Jonathan Bayard Smith and Samuel F. Bradford, vice-presidents ; Robert 

S. Stevenson, secretary*; and. Samuel Realf, treasurer. The Society had 
a banquet and the toasts were patriotic rather than partisan. Bishop 
White, Jonathan Williams, Chief-Justice Tilghman, and Captain Charles 
Stewart, U.S.X., were present: It would be interesting to learn further 
particulars as to its history, and how long its members continued to cele- 
brate its anniversary with a dinner." 

Sons or Washington. — -The badge worn by each member was a gold 
medallion containing a bust portrait of Washington, engraved in stipple, 
after Stuart's Athemcuni head, apparently by David Edwin. At the top 
is engraved the name of the member ; at the bottom, " Feb. 22, 1810 ;" 
on the back, ''Sons of Washington." I know of four of these badges 
bearing, respectively, the names of Thomas C. Wharton, Eli Canby, 
John F. MiilUn, and William Bethel. 

ClIAKLEd IlENKY }[A1;T. 

Waknick. — Ann Warwick married Charles Peters November 17, 1S21. 
Children of Albert and Marv A. Wamiek : Conrad Z. J., b. April 15, 
1S13 ; Ztihj Ann, b. Mareh L ; 7, 1815 ; Albert L\, b. February 27, 1817 ; 
CharUs (timer, b. May 21, 1821 ; WVtkim tern, b, November 25, 1823. 

Ed. TriNNA. Mao. 



THE 

PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE 

OF 

HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 



Vol. XXIV. 1900. No. 2. 



THE MOTIIEIl OF LINCOLN. 

BY HOWARD M. JENKINS. 

From time to time the superiority of record evidence 
over tradition, and of documentary proof over gossip and 
legend, is strikingly presented. We have now an interest- 
ing instance in the case of Abraham Lincoln's parentage. 

o Jl D 

There lias been extant, ever since the career of Lincoln and 
every detail connected with him became the subject of 
sympathetic interest on the part of his countrymen, a suppo- 
sition that his mother was not of legitimate birth. This, 
indeed, has not been treated as a supposition: it has been 
circumstantially and positively asserted in some of the most 
authoritative biographies. In "W. IE Uerndon's "Life" of 
Lincoln lie relates the story of illegitimacy as coming 
from Lincoln himself in an isolated and notable conversa- 
tion, and J. T. Morse has cited this with full assurance in 
his "Life," in the "American Statesmen" series. Other 
biographers allude to and recognize the tale, and it has no 
doubt been generally received and credited. 

Now, it is plain that there is no truth whatever in this 
story. Nancy Hanks was not the daughter of u Luvy" 
von. xxiv.— ( 129) 



130 The Muthr <>f Lmvhu 



Hanks, as Herndon so positively says; in tact, it is not clear 
that there ever was such a person as Lucy Hanks. Xor 
was Nancy the daughter of any unmarried woman. On 
the contrary, her family record is unimpeachable, her birth 
is without a cloud, the evil story concerning her is appar- 
ently a pure invention — not a pure invention, either, but an 
impure, a base slander, derived from some vulgar and 
scandalous source. If Lincoln ever told such a story to 
Ilcrndon — which may be confidently disbelieved — he was 
mistaken, and must have been misled by some evil whisper 
that had been unhappily brought to his ears. 1 

The little book, "Kancy Hanks," by Mrs. Caroline Hanks 
Hitchcock, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, published in 1899 
(Xew York: Doubleday & McClure Co.), is the source of 
the knowledge which sets right this story of illegitimacy. 
It distinctly and conclusively shows who the mother of Lin- 
coln was. It identities both her parents. It proves them 
reputable people. It places her in the list of their children, 
with full title to respect. 

There is other, matter in Mrs. Hitchcock's book, some of 
which is entitled to our consideration also, but this in rela- 
tion to tbe parentage of Abraham Lincoln's mother is bv 

JO v 

far the most important. Mrs. Hitchcock has found (at Lards- 
town, Kentucky, the introduction to her book states) a 
document, heretofore imprinted, which is conclusive as to 
this point. She gives complete, both in typo and in photo- 
graphic fac-simile, the will of Joseph Hanks. He was of 
-*• Xelson County, Kentucky. His will is dated January 0, ;. 

1793, and was duly probated in that county. May 14, of the 
same year. In his will Joseph Hanks names his eisrht J 

children. There were live sons, Thomas, Joshua, William, 
Charles, and Joseph, and three daughters, Elizabeth, Polly, 
and XtHicy. The will provided for them all, and remembers 
equally the three girls. It thus records the father's impar- 
tial irifts: i 
v 

l The genesis of the ulca of illegitimate birth wan m.-vle easier by im- 
perfect knowledge uf the rcI;Uimu>hips i»f Xauey Ifcnk*** family. 

i 

i 



The Mother of UneohK 131 

"Item. — I give and bequeath unto my daughter Elizabeth one hei'cr 
yearling culled Gentle, Item. — I give and bequeath unto my daughter 
Polly one heifer yearling called Lady. Item. — ] give and bequeath 
unto my daughter Nancy one heifer yeaning called lVidy." 

We Lave here in Xelson Comity, Kentucky, in the year 
1793, jSTaney Hanks, daughter of Joseph. That she was 
the same who thirteen years later, June 12, 1806, was 
married by the Rev, Jesse Head, the Methodist preacher, 
to Thomas Lincoln, is not open, to question. She is fully 
identified by abundant proof. 

Joseph Hanks had been in Kentucky, prior to his death, 
only about four years. He had come, it is said, from Amelia 
County, Virginia. Following now Mrs. Hitchcock's sreneral 
account, his wife was Xancy (she is called " Nanny" in the 
will), and she was the daughter o^ Robert Shipley. 1 The 
wife of Robert Shipley, Mrs. Hitchcock says, was named 
Sarah liachaeh Thev were in Lunenburg County. Virginia, 
in 1765, where Robert Shipley bought land, three hundred 
and fourteen acres, September 3 6, of that year. Lunenburg 
County is near to Amelia County, 2 in which Joseph Hanks 
is said to have lived before his removal to .Kentucky. 

The Shipleys had five daughters. These and their mar- 
riages, as given by Mrs. Hitchcock, were: 

1. Maiiy. She married Abraham Lincoln, of Rocking- 
ham County, Virginia. (son of John Lincoln, who had come 
from Berks County, Pennsylvania). She was thus the 
mother of Thomas Lincoln. Abraham Lincoln removed 
to Kentucky with his family, and was killed there by 
Indians, 1784. 

2. Lie v. She married Richard Berry. They removed 
to Kentucky, probably in 1789, with Joseph Hanks and 

l This is the statement also of Mr. Samuel Suae k ford, in bis paper on 
Lincoln's ancestry, in the Sew 'England Hktoriml and Genealogical 
AV.'/'vV/-, April, 18S7. lb? describes Robert Shipley, however, as of 
Korth Carolina. 

'Mrs. Hitelicoek says "the next county." It is not now so, Notto- 
way Count v 1 vlut! between. 



132 



The Mother of Lincoln. 



others. Lucy Berry, after the death of her sister Xaney, 
the. wife of Joseph Hanks, which occurred soon after the 
death of Joseph, " brought iff" her' niece, Xaucy Uanks. 
Richard Berry was the bondsman for Thomas Lincoln in his 
marriage to Xaney Hanks. The marriage took place at Rich- 
ard Berry's house, at Beechland, near Springfield, in Wash- 
ington County, Kentucky. It is this Lucy — Berry — who 
has been called in several of the biographies of Lincoln 
"Lucy Hanks," it being supposed, through the mists of 
dim recollection, that Nancy Hanks was actually her daugh- 
ter by Mood, and not merely by adoption. 

3. Sarah, She married Robert Mitchell; they removed 
to Kentucky. 

4. Elizabeth. She married Thomas Sparrow. This 
family also went to Kentucky, and in t}:o accounts of those 
who remembered the Lincohis and the liankses there are 
many allusions to the Sparrows. 

5. Nancy. She married Joseph 1 tanks, referred to 
above. His will identities her. " I give and bequeath to 
my wife Nanny all and singular my whole estate during 
her life, afterward to be equally divided between all my' 
children .... I constitute, ordain, and appoint my wife 
Nanny and my son William as executrix and executor to 
this my last will and testament. " 



DESCENT OF NANCY HANKS. 

Robert Sliif-Tcy - ■ Sarah Rac!i»o) 

Mary Lucy Sarah Elisabeth Nancy 

m. m. m. m. s ?.i. 

Abraham Lincoln Richard Berry l:<i!-c:t Mitchell Titos, Simrroro Jase|4i Hanks 

i 

Thomas 

Jovhua 

WIUiuDI. m. Ka/aU-Ca UsU 

Charles 

Jo- ;-!i. lit. l'ol!y Young 

KlixulicCU, m. Levi Hail 
— — ■ roily, m. Jlv-c Krien«J 



Thomas Linculx — Nancy 

a it a ham lincoln 



The Mother .,/ Lincoln \. 133 

It will bo observed that Thomas? ^Lincoln and Xaney 
Hanks were first cousins — he the son of . Mary Shipley, and 
she the daughter of Xaney Shi ['ley. I am not aware that 
this fact has heretofore been distinctly brought out. 

Mrs. Hitchcock's book not only gives in far-simile the 
will of Joseph Hanks, but also, in fac-simile, three docu- 
ments which relate to the marriage of Thomas Lincoln and 
Nancy Hanks, and which fix the time and the place, as well 
as the fact, beyond cavil. These are (1) the marriage bond 
given by Thomas Lincoln and Richard Berry, June 10, 
180G, two days before the marriage; (2) the marriage cer- 
tificate of Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks, siirned bv 
Rev. Jesse Head; (3) the "return list" of marriages sent 
in to the court clerk by Rev. Jesse Head, dated April 22, 
1807, and containing with fifteen others the marriage of 
Thomas Lincoln and Xaney Hanks, on the date already 
given. 

The second of these documents, as numbered above, is 
new, so far as I am aware. The marriage bond and the 
"return list" were both printed in fac-simile in Nicolay and 
Hay's "Life" of Lincoln, but not the certificate. Mrs. 
Hitchcock does not state where or when it was brought 
to light; she mentions that " gradually the documents [re- 
lating to the marriage] were unearthed, owing largely to 
the efforts of Mrs. Vauter [? Vawtcr] and Mr. Thompson, of 
Louisville, Kentucky." The certificate is, oi" course, cumu- 
lative testimony; the return list, taken with the bond, was 
already conclusive on the fact ^[ the marriage. 

The relationship of Nancy Hanks to Joseph Hanks, the 
carpenter, of Elizabethtown, with whom Thomas Lincoln 
" learned his trade," is made clear by the list, of children 
in the will of the Joseph 1 Links of 1793. The Joseph oi 
180G was evidently his son, the youngest of the five in the 
will. He was the brother of Nancy, and, like her, first 
cousin to Thomas Lincoln. 1 

1 Nieolay and Hay say (Vol, I., p. 23), "he [Thomas Lincoln] mar- 
ried Nancy Hank-, a niece of hh employer." They all that ''Mrs. 



1H4 the Mother of £iW#>. . . 

Mrs. Ilitclic&cfc gives n f»age or tv.*o to n defence of the J 

character of Tin miaa Lincoln. Probably this will be unavail- 
ing, but it is no doubt just. The figure of Thomas Lincoln, 
as presentee! in most of the Mograplues of his son, is a 
caricature. In the earlier ones he appears as a good- 
humored, indolent, and incapable person, but later ones, 
enlarging and dilating upon this, represent him as coarse, 
uncouth, and altogether worthless.. Out of this there grew 
a vulvar and scandalous idea that Thomas Lincoln could not 
have been the father of so icreat a son. 1 

A very moderate application of common sense to the sub- 
ject will show that the ordinary notion adverse to Thomas 
Lincoln is unreasonable. The known facts concerning him 
show him to have been a man of his class, a hardy and 
energetic pioneer, meeting resolutely the trials and diflicul- 
ties that faced him, and contending with them with fair 
success. Let us consider briefly some of these. (1) Tie 
learned a trade, that of a carpenter. (2) He took up a 

Lincoln's mother was named Lucy I Links; her sisters were Betty, 

Tolly, and Nancy, who married Thomas sparrow, Jesse Friend, and 

Levi Hall'.* 4 There is no little confusion in these statements, hut it 

may he readily corrected by a reference to the diagram given above with 

the text. The foster mother of Xancy Hanks was Lucy (Shipley) Berry, 

her aunt. IJelty Sjwirrow was her aunt as stated ; Lolly Friend was her ^ 

sister; Nancy, sister pf Lucy Berry, was her own mother, not the wife 

of Levi Hall, but of Jo-eph Hanta ; Levi Hall's wife was the Elizabeth 

of the youncrer generation,' Xancy's sister. i 

The confusion in Nieolay and Hay at this point is presented also in 
Hcrndon, who pretended to have such a competent knowledge. He 
says in a foot-mite, "Hennis and John Hanks have always insisted that 
Lincoln's .mother was not a Haulis hut a Sparrow. Ljth of them wrote 
to me that such was the fact. Their object in insisting on this is appar- 
ent when it is shown that XancV Hani:- was the daughter of Lucy 
Hanks, who afterwards married Henry Sparrow. It will Le observed 
[however] that "dr. Lincoln claimed that his mother was a Hanks." 

1 This myth, n«.»: ctticli ad nitted into print, c\i-N w.diy and in manu- 
eeri|>t. A 1 dy promitteut 'in literature, and otherwise well knows, 
earnestly cautioned the writer uf this, some yeaw.a-jo, not to investigate 
the parentage ot' Liucolo. Vet, n we see, invest igatiou was precisely 
the thins needed. 



: 

The Mother of JJntdri. i3a 

quarter section of land (on Xolin's Creek), which it is testi- 
fied was '• a fair representative section of the land in the 
immediate region." Collin, who saw it hi 1S00, says it was 
then under cultivation, and yielding an average crop. (3) . 
His second purchase of land (Knob's Creek) had ?• many 
acres that are very fertile." l (4) lie resolved to move to a 
State with free labor. (5) lie sold out his Kentucky land 
without loss. (G) Though his boat was overset in the river, 
he recovered his property. (7) lie sought out good land in 
Indiana. (8) lie travelled seventy miles to Vinccnnes to 
enter Ids new claim. (9) Through the winter he hewed the 
timber for his new cabin. 

As to his acuteness and his perception of character, cer- 
tainlv the selections he made when seeking: both his first and 
second wives stand to his credit. Both Nancy Hanks and 
Sally Bush are described by all as women of exceptional 
qualities. There were, it may be added, a Bible and other 
books in the Indiana cabin, and Thomas apparently wrote 
his own name, without a "mark," to the marriage- bond of 
1800. 

Tlie temptation to "heighten the efifeet," to paint with 
vivid colors, in popular biographies, is very strong, and it 
results in most unjustified and misleading — often very unfair 
— work. In the case of Thomas Lincoln 1 have not a par- 
ticle of doubt that the received picture of him is thoroughly 
wrong. 

Mrs. Hitchcock announces that a full genealogy of the 
Hanks family is in preparation. In her present volume she 
sketches what she believes to be the ancestry of Joseph 
Hanks, the father of Lincoln's mother, and in this I am 
obliged to confess a particular interest. It was suggested in 
my book relating to the township of Gwynetld, Pennsylva- 
nia, that it might very probably be that Nancy Hanks was 
descended from a family of llanke, or Hank, in the region 

1 C. C. Coffin,—* who adds : *' It would seem that hi- selection* of hind 
cannot with justice he cited iu evidence of iuetUcieney or want of judg- 
ment." 



136 The Mother of J/uicohi. 

near Philadelphia, one of whom, John, died in Wliitcnutrsh. 
1730- 31, another of whom was in .lierks County, in the 
neighborhood of the Lincolns, about 1754, and one of 
whom, perhaps Joseph, is said to have gone to Virginia with 
Jolm Lincoln, grandfather of the President. This theory 
was supported by a number of facts, and seemed to me very 
reasonable. I had hoped that in time the finding of further 
documentary evidence might establish its correctness. Mean- 
while, Xicolav and Hay have recoirnized its probability in 
their work, and Coffin lias adopted it more completely than 
anything I had said on the subject would quite justify. 

Mrs. Hitchcock lias, however, an entirely different line of 
descent. She does not come back to Pennsylvania at all ; 
she has a Massachusetts immigrant ancestor for 'the Ken- 
tucky* llankses. Here is the line she oilers : 

I. Benjamin Hanks, from England (probably Malmcs- 
bury, in "Wilts), who, with others, landed in Plymouth, Mas- 
sachusetts, 1699, and settled in Pembroke, Plymouth County. 
•'Among the parish records of Rev. Daniel Lewis," Mrs. 
Hitchcock has found the list of his children, eleven by a first 
wife and one by a second. The third one was — 

II. "William, born in Pembroke, Plymouth County, Feb- 
ruary 11, 1704. Of him, beyond his birth, there is no fur- 
ther record. Mrs. Hitchcock accepts family tradition that 
he went on a sailing-vessel to Virginia, and settled " near 
the mouth of the Rappahannock River, where his sons, 
Abraham, Richard, James, John, and Joseph, were born.'' 

III. Joseph, Mrs. Hitchcock says all of William's chil- 
dren, named above, "with the exception of John, moved to 
Amelia County, Virginia, where they bought large planta- 
tions near each other," and adds that c * Joseph must have 
moved to Amelia County, with the rest, about 17-J0." She 
proceeds then to identify him as the same Joseph Hanks 
>vho was in Xelson County, Kentucky, in 1793, and who 
made his will and died there that year. . 

"\Vc must see more of the evidence which Mrs. Hitchcock 
may be presumed to have, and whieh we suppose she will 



The Mother of Lincoln. .. 137 

print in her larger book, before a definite judgment can be 
passed on tliis Massachusetts derivation of Lincoln's mother. 

But we may fairly examine a moment what is now offered. 

There is record evidence, it seems, that a Joseph Hanks 
was in Amelia County, Virginia, much earlier than the time 
of the removal to Kentucky. A person of that name sold 
land there in 1747, and bought other land in 1754. The 
records of these transactions Mrs. Hitchcock found in 
Richmond. The sale in 1747 was 2S4 acres M on the lower 
side of Seller Creek," to Abraham Hanks, presumed to be 
Joseph's brother. The purchase in 1754 was a Crown 
grant of ; 246 acres "on the upper side of Sweathouse 
Creek," adjoining land of Abraham Hanks and others. 
■ There are some weak places, certainly, in this chain. The 
"family traditions'' concerning "William yiqqc\ support. His 
migration from Plymouth to tidewater Virginia, and his 
location "near the mouth of the Rappahannock l\iver, : ' 
seem vague and uncertain. But, accepting them as correct, 
was William's son, Joseph, the same person as he whose 
will showed him to be Xancy Hanks's father! It is a long 
gap in time — and a long distance as well — between an 
authenticated date in Massachusetts in 1704 and [mother in 
Kentucky in 1703. 

One thing seems tolerably plain. The Joseph Hanks who 
sold land in Amelia .County in 1747 cannot have been the 
son of "William, born in 170-3. There is not enough time. 
Forty-three years is not 'sufficient for William to grow up, 
marry, and have a fifth child of competent age for making 
title to land. If we suppose William to marry at the early 
age of twenty, in 17-1, and suppose his fifth child to be born 
in six years, — most unlikely. — that would make Joseph's 
birth in 1780, and .in 1747 he would legally only be an 
"infant," seventeen years old. Certainly, unless some of 
Mrs. IlitC'heook's dates, or other of her data, are UTOli;?, it is 
very difficult to suppose that the Joseph Hanks of 1747 is 
the son of William Hank*, horn in 1701. And, if this be 
conceded, the question follows, Was the Joseph oi 1734 



13S The Mother of Lbrola. 

William's Bun : The two Josephs tvlio sold awl taught 
land in the one county, 1747 and 1754, were probably the 
the same person, so it' one was not William's son the other 
was not. 

If', however, these difficulties are disposed of, the question 
next arises, Can the Joseph Hanks of 1754 he the same 
whose' daughter, Xanev, was born in 1784? In such a case 
thirty years is a good while. Mrs. Hitchcock says that it 
was on the tract'bought in 1754 "he [Joseph] then settled, 
and all his children were born/' If he acquired it for a 
home, being then married, or about to marry, it is unlikely, 
though possible, that even his youngest child would be born 
thirty years after — of one wife. Again, Robert Shipley is 
stated to have bought his land in Lunenburg County in 
17G5 — eleven years after Joseph Ilanks's purchase of 1754 
in Amelia County. Are we to infer that Joseph did not 
marry Mary Shipley until her father bought this land? 
Joseph would be in 1765, if of age in 1754, a bachelor of 
at least thirty-one years — quite a contrast to the early mar- 
riage of his father which we are obliged to assume in order 
to make Joseph of age in 1754. 

I have no desire to argue any question with Mrs. Hitch- 
cock, nor to throw discredit on her work, in which all who 
care for the Lincoln family-tree are interested. The con- 
tribution she makes concerning Joseph 1 Tanks oi^ 1793 is — 
as lias been said-— highly important. It is to be hoped that 
her full account of the Hanks family in America will make 
all the now obscure points perfectly plain. I eannoi entirety 
give up, as yet, the idea of the. connection of the llanke 
people. in Pennsylvania with the Lineolns. That appears to 
rest on a good foundation at some points, if it should prove 
to be unfounded as to the vital one — the parentage of Xaney 
Hanks. 



Letteri of the Ret. Griffith Ihnjhcs, 1733-173&. 130 



LETTERS OF THE REV. GRIFFITH HUGHES, OF ST. 
DAVIDS OILURCH, KUDKOB, PEXXA., 1733-1730. 

BY KEXJA.MIN* F. OWEX. 

[While examining the records pertaining to the early settlement of 
Coniru Township, Perks County, Pennsylvania, the abandoned site of 
an Anglican Church and graveyard was discovered, which had been 
used by the "Welsh settlers of the district. A personal inspection of the 
ground led to the finding of two gravestones, one to the memory of 
Hugh Jones, an early settler and large land-owner, who died in 1734, 
and the other to his daughter Jane, who died in 1730. It was further 
developed that Jones had, by will, bequeathed the land in Comru and 
also a horse to the Pew Griffith Hughes, a missionary of the "Society 
for Propagating the Gospel in Foreign Parts," who was in charge of 
St. David's Church at Radnor. As the "Historical Collections relative 
to the American Colonial Church," by the late Bishop Perry, contains 
but very little data relating to the Rev, Mr. Hughes, researches were 
made in the Archives of the "S. P. G." Society, in London, and the 
following interesting and valuable letters and document* covering the 
period of his labors in Pennsylvania were found. 

Griffith Hughes, son of Edward Hughes, of Towyn, Merionethshire, 
AVales, was born about 1707. He matriculated at St. John's College, 
Oxford, in 1720, and received the degrees of 15. A. and M.A. in 174S. 
In 1733 he was sent by the Society to Pennsylvania, where "he labored 
at St. David's, Radnor, and also among the WeUh Mttlers in Lancaster 
and what i- now Perks counties. His health failing, he left for the 
Island of Parbadoes, where he became Kcetor of St. Lucy'- Parish. \\\ 
1750 he was made a Fellow of the Royal Society and published his 
"Natural History ot* PaiUeloev' a royal folio of three hundred and 
twenty-four pages, illustrated with twenty-nine pi a tea and dedicated to 
the Archbishop of Canterbury. The Library Company of Philadelphia 
appears among th* uaroc^ of American subscribers t> the work, and • 
possesses :~everal copies. He also pr< pared for the rid.v-wphhal Society 
(England) a paper on "A Zoipliytnn r«^em!»lin.: the ilower of the Mari- 
gold." The date of death of Mr. Itujbva ha>s mil been ascertained.] 



140 Littm of the Puc. Griffith ILj(jh.$ v 1733-1736. 

The TiM'moidah of Mr. Griffith Hughes. 
Sir: 

Our Statutes do not suppose any person. of y* Society to 
be in holy orders before lie lias taken his degrees of Bache- 
lor of Arts and therefore letters Testimonial under our 
College Seal cannot regularly he granted to Mr. Hughes, 
for that purpose ; But as a Certificate of his good behaviour 
is necessary at present, before 'a particular occasion, 1 beg 
leave to acquaint you, that during the time he has been 
with us, which is fourteen terms, lie has behaved well, and 
seems worthy of any favours, w ch the Bishop of London or 
the ■ Honorable Society may confer upon him. 

I am Sir — you most humbe serv 1 

W. Holmes 
St. John's Collg c 
Oxox, July 29 th 1732. 

This is to Certify whom it may concern that Griffith 
Hu^hs of St. Johns Coll<r e in the Universitv of Oxford, 
hath for these 3 years last past behaved himself soberly 
and regularly, according to the Statutes of the said College, 
and as far as we apprehend, is a person perfectly qualified 
to stand Candidate for Holy Orders, and holds nothing Con- 
trary to the Doctrines of the Church of England. 

Augt y e 1 st 17§2 ] "Witness our ha nets 

F. West, B. ]). . I . Wm. Holmes, PrcsideM 

J. Dry, B. D J Wm. Bridge, D:D : 

Kor..rK.Miii-:uTox A:D: JXv.AH: AVixcn. IIoli>swortii, DJ): 
J a* Suck, A.M. Dec. Art. S. Bignell, D:D: 

JUi\ lltifffcs to the Secretary of "#, }\ (//' 

St. John's Collkge, uxkoj-.p, July l it 1782. 
RlEVKli* Sir 

I had the honour of Ik-mil: Rccomxucudcd to you by Doc' 
Partlo, to siu-ccL-d in the vacancy in Pvusilvutiia and by his 
advice I have since done m\self the pleasure of writing to 



Letters of the Tier. Grbjith lltyhf*, 17S3-1736. 141 

vou, in order to be informM of the particular encouragm 1 
& how soon the vacancy must be supplyed, arid whetlior it 

will serve for a Title to go to orders, I can't persuade myself 
that you have receVd my last, therefore I beg that you would 
honour me with an expeditions answer to this which will 

■ Reverend Sir 
very much oblige your very 

Humble serv* to Command 

Giti: Hughes 
Direct for me at 

St. Johns College, Oxon, 

and let me know when the next Society Will meet. 



Mr. Hughes to the Secretary "& P. (?." 

Kadxor ; Pexsilvaxia, Mnr : 2 u: 17o3. 

Revered Sir : 

I have the pleasure of acquainting the honorable Society 
at my first entry upon my mission. I was very kindly 
Received especially by the Welch in my Immediate proceed- 
ings after my arrival I endeavourd at those methods y* 
would best answer the Trust reposed in me, and to y* end 
besides performing those" duties y* particular!}' belong to my 
oflice I have visited all my Parishioners at their respected 
houses, and found a great many of them much neglected in 
their Education & Ignorant of the very fundamental!* of 
Religion. Others whose principles were very much vitiated 
with false doctrines I endeavour'd to recti lye the mistakes 
of the Latter and to Instruct the former what was necessary 
to be believed and practised : I had no sooner finished this 
task then I found a great necessity of visiting a great many 
Welch and English Gent** y l lived far back in the Woods, 
where I found a great number of well Disposed persons 
Lut Intirely Destitute of a Minister at their earnest request 
I have s^one thereseverall times since, and for a Ions time 
had no other place to preach but under the Shade of a 
Large tree their houses being; too small to contain the errcat 



1-12 Letters of iU Juc. Griffith llt'/ks, 17JJ-17JG. 



Churchwardens $ Vestry to if Secret* «& R G" 

Radnor, Pexsilvaxia Sep*. 25 th 1734. 



numl»cr that resorted there; nry la>t Journey to them Corn- 
pleated in all one Thousand one Hundred and live miles 
beetles my weekly attendance at Radnor, ft .Penjuihoma, 
at either of which Chtirehcs, I preach and Catechize every 
Sunday: The number of Communicants in Radnor at my 
first Comeing was 48 now Increased to 55 at Perquihoma 
10 Enercased to 21 I have Christened in all near 100, Ten 
of them being adults, This being all that offers at present 
from the Hon 1 '- Society in Gefterall and your most 
Obedient humble Servant 

Geo: Hughes. 



We the Vestrymen & Ch c * Wardens of St.. David, Church 
at Radnor in ye Province of Pensilvania, do beg leave to 
Return the JJon ,:> ' Society for the propogation of the Gospell 
in foreign parts; our Sincere thanks for their favour & great 
goodness, in sending- the Rev' 1 Mr. Hughes, to be our Mis- 
sionary who not only, so well officiates in ye Welch tongue, 
hut also by his great care, learning and Piety sufficiently 
demonstrates the Honorable Society's most prudent Choice 

We all remain as in duty bound the Honourable Society's 
most obedient and most obliged Humble Servants. 
Tho\ Godfrey, Win. Owen, Thos : James, Joseph Jones, 
Wm. Jones, John Currey, A Hugh Hughes, James David, 
Evan David, Morrifs GrfrTrrh, Wm. Evans, Peter Elliot. 
Jacob Jones, .John Hughes, Hugh David, 

Mr. Hughes to tit Sccrdmy - .*?. P. G." 

Kauxoi: Pkxmiaama, Dccenb' 3 J 1734, 
Rev* Sir 

Since my last I have nothing worth notice to acquaint 
you and the lion. Society except that I have- made several] 
Joumevs to visit the back Inhabitants. Son: 'times 00 or 



Letters of the JRcir. Griffith llwjhi*, 273J-17JG. 143 

70 mites from home where I Crisiened a great number 
But in more particular at Canistoga where for some time 
past I preached both in Welch & English, on the first 
Tuesday in every month : and have at present the pleasure 
of seeing the number of Communicants there from Twelve 
Increased to Twenty Six ail sober well Disposed persons — 
The greatest Inconvenience that we labour under is the 
greatest scarcity of Welch Books, myself being the only 
person that officiates in that Langtuige my Best endeavour 
can hear no proportion to the generall want of so many 
Thousands of that nation wlro are scattered in "this province, 
k dayly Importune me to Supply them with Welch Books 
and most of them are both able & willing .to purchase y*: 
and I humbly conceive that their Expectations were 
answered it would he (especially where Orthodox ministers 
are wanting) the only means to keep our Religion in its 
purity among so many disadvantages I would rather be 
thought Impertinent in troubling, the Honourable Society 
with my Sentiments upon this Head — than Blame myself, 
for not endeavouring at so great an act of Charity that 
may with the Blefsing of God put a stop to those fatal 
consequeneys, which by Daily Kxperienee we find to be 
Occasioned in a Great Measure, by the want of Good Books 
and if the Honourable Society who have hitherto distin- 
guished themselves by a Continuell series of benevolent & 
Charitable actions will' so far encourage This as to permit me 
to Come to London ye Latter end of next Sumer I doubt 
not but in a short time with the assistance of a worthy 
Gentleman now In Jesus College we shall be able to reprint 
or Translate a sufficient number to answer ye present 
necessity. The favour of Hearing from you early in the 
Spring will very mucli oblige 

Sir — yours ami the IIonoura M ' Socictys 

most Humble and obedient Servant 

Griffith Hughes. 



I 



144 Litters of the Itec.' Griffith llagha^ 1733-173G. . 

TL Mntfontte of Canesiogoc to the "& P. G." 

Pensilvaxia. 1734 

May it please the Hon: Society for propagating the Gospel] 
iu foreign parts. 

TJie Petition pi* the underneath subscribers at Ganestogoc 
• llumbly Shewetlu 

That we being well uftbeted to the Church of England 
tho : Destitute for several! years of an Orthodox minister 
until the Comeing of our Dear Countryman Mr. Hughes, 
who hath undergone great Hardship to come, and preach to 
us once a month to our great comfort; we are Increased very 
much in members since Ids Comeing, and since we can't as 
yet expect the Happinefs of a Missionary we humbly pray 
to be supplied with some Welch Books, the want of which 
has been our greatest unhappincis, an unhappy experience 
of this we have had, in ye number of Forty Families that 
were Educated in the principles of the Church of England, 
that came in together yet for the want of Good Books in 
their own Language, thev at last yielded to the General 
Coruption of Quakerism — would the Honourable Society 
bc ]>leased to Bestow on us a Welch Bible and Common 
prayer fur the use of our Church, your Petitioners should 
esteem it as a great favour; At Mr. Hughes iirst arrival] 
we had no other Convenicncv than the shade of anv Large 
Tree to preach under, but now we have built a Handsome 
Church — as for the other "Welch books we are willing to 
purchase them at any Reasonable rate wc have entrusted 
the liev 1 Mr. lluglies, to take the trouble upon him to 
Come over, and get us such a quantity as will be answerable 
to our want — it' this he agreabk to the Hon: Society's 
pleasure it will be a great Encouragement to our pure doc- 
trine & be a means in the hand of Providence to preserve 
many Souls from fake Doctrine and Schism which uuhaopi- 
iiefs we have to often Experienced. 

We hope that your Charity which hath already l>i-- 
timmished itself, for the Eternal Welfare v{ so manv Souls. 



J 



Letters of the Jlec. Griffith H»rjhes, 1733-17SG. 145 

will encourage this one humble request and until we Can 

hope for a Missionary beg to bo supplyed at any rate with 
Welch Looks, which is the earnest Kequest and the Hum- 
ble petition of the undernamed, and indeed of our whole 
Church here in generall. 

And your Petitioners as in Duty hound shall ever pray 
George Hudson, Jenkin David, John Edwards, 

John Da vies, Joint Brown, Badam David, 

Edward Davies, Morgan John, John David, 

Evan Hughes, Solomon Thomas, Zaeheus David, 

Edward Nicholas, Gab 1 Davies, W" Willy, 

Roger Parry, Phillip David, Edward Thomas, 

Morgan-Morgans, Hugh David, John Jones, 

John Evans, Xathan 1 Evans, Morifs Richard. 

Mr. ffuffh.es to ye Lord JBp : of London. 

Radnor m Pessilvania, Sep : 10 th 1735. 
My Loud 

When I consider that your Lordships with the rest of the 
Hon: Society have already so remarkably distinguished y r 
Selves by acts of Universal benevolence & Charity I hope 
the same goodnefs will excuse the trouble of receiving this 
\\"- h comes to Inform your lordshipp in my 2 last Letters to 
the Society unanswered I have Petitioned in the name of 
some hundreds o^ my Countrymen to be permittee] for a 
very short time to return home to reprint and at their ex- 
pence to supply them with Welch Books y fl want of which 
is so universal that it has been the Chief occasion of the 
Increase of so many Dissenters nothing but such an abso- 
lute necessity c d come in Competition w th y* due regard I 
always had for y r Lordship: could have obliged me to give 
you this trouble the I would almost chuse to trespofs upon 
y r Lship's goodness then be in the least wanting to promote 
an Act w ch w* the Blessing of God mav be oi % so happy a 
consequence & were not my Comeing to England without 
the previous Consent ot' y r Lordship & y*. lion 1 Society to 
great a presumption y* present would be the most proper 
vol. xxiv. — 10 



146 Letters of the Ma\ Griffith. lL«jhe$, 173S~17oG. 

opportunity if my absence would be Pispenced with for 
lately in my way to perqwihoma Church 1 had the misfor- 
tune to break my knee pan, which Continues tlio upon tlie 
mending hand very weak so that it is Impossible, for me in 
my present Condition to serve that Church in a Regular 
order this present winter, that and several! other liardshipps 
which I have with pleasure almost endured in my severall 
Journeys to preach among the Back Inhabitants hath very 
much Impaired my health being often obliged in the day 
to want, the Common necessaries of Life, and in the night 
to be contented the shade of a Large tree lor a Lodging as 
for my Congregation at Radnor it is in a very nourishing 
Condition, and as to my own Conduct in Gencrall I appeal 
to my reverend Commifsary who is a Gent n equally beloved 
and admired for his behaviour Piety and good Conduct, I 
hope your Lordshipp will Excuse this presumption and 
believe me to be w th all respect Imaginable 

My Lord y r Lordship's most Obedient 

& most Humble Servant 

Gkiitith Hughes. I 

] 
Mr. IIagh.es to the Secretary « & P. Gv" 

Kadnor, June 25 th 1736. 
Hev d Sir. • < 



I hope by this time the IIon b ' e Society arc Informed by 
the hands, of the Rev d M. Commifsary Johnson, of my 
being at Barbadoes,. the Chief Reason of my going there 
was as unexpected as unavoidable, and nothing but an 
absolute necessity, would have oblig'd me to quit my Mis- 
sion without the Previous Consent ot^ the Society. At the 
Earnest 1 Request of a very considerable number of both 
Welch & English that live near Toljjahoekin 70 miles from 
Town I officiated' there & at Canestugo, at Sundry times; 
But the Fatigue of returning home by Saturday night to 
take Care of the 'Churches more particularly under mv 
care, X the great Diiliculty of travailing into so Kemote a 
part of the Country, with severall Inconveniences too 



Letters of the Jteu. Griffith Hughes, 1733-173G. 147 ' 

tedious to be mentioned, threw me into a very 111 state of 
health, my Physicians were of opinion that a Sudden 
change of air would be absolutely necessary for me, especi- 
ally to one of the Leeward Islands, and if I found no benefit 
there to return to England, \v cb I resolved upon rather then 
Run the hazard of my Life by staying. And as it has 
always been my greatest ambition, to have my conduct 
approv'd on by the lion 6 Soey I hope they are too Indul- 
gent to be Displeased at a fault (if it be such) not in my 
Power to prevent without Immenent Danger. — I had no 
sooner arrived at Bbds but I found great Benefit by the 
Change of air, soon after the Rectory of S c Lucy's Parish 
became vacant w ch by the Earnest Request of the Rev 4 M. 
Commy Johnson I was prevailed upon to accept. I enjoy'd 
it for near three month?, k then obtained a Lycence from 
the Honourable James Dottin Esq r our Commander in Chief 
to Return to Pensilvania: for 4- months, where I now offici- 
ate at Radnor k Perquihoma — at the expiration of which 
time I design with the Hon 6 Society, to return to Barbadoes, 
then beg leave to Resign my Mission, praying that the 
Hon bIe Society will be pleased to supply it w- b another as 
-soon as possible: whether my Diligence to assist at several] 
other places, besides my Churches at Radnor & Perquihoma 
will in the least entitle me, to that part of. my Salary due 
in my absence must be left to the Generosity of the Honor- 
able Society, I hope I can say without vanity that whilst I 
continued in the Province I have Discharged my Duty to 
the utmost of my Power, & I believe to the General! Satis- 
faction of all under my care; To make my. unavoidable 
absence more Easy to them some time in the Fall before I 
went to Barbadoes, I have been at a very great Expenoe in 
Publishing a Welch Pamphlctt, upon Death, Judgment, 
Heaven & Hell; and have Distributed near 150 Coppies 
Gratis among the poorer sort, upon my arrival at Pen iha- 
nia I received from M. Commis' Cummings The favour o( 
3Ion e Societies '2 Letters, with the Books as Specified; and 
most humbly beg Leave to put the lion Society in mind, 



i 

: 

i 

| 

! 
148 Letters of the Rev. Griffith H>"jhc$, 1733-17J6. 

that some time agoe they were pleased to supply us Gratis, 
with a very considerable number of such small Tracts 
which render these a! I most entirely needless. The Welch 
Boohs which we so much wanted here are some small Com* 
pendium of Divinity, such ns the Practice of Piety, the 
whole Duty of Man the Pev' 1 Mr. Pritchard's Divine Poems, 
k Common Prayer Books. The Bibles w ch the JIon c Society 
were pleased to send, shall he Distributed according to 
Direction — In hopes of being favoured with an Answer I 
Remain with all due Respects, The lion* Societies most 
obedient and most Humble Servant 

Griffith Hughes. 

[Same to same^ 

Radnor in Pknsilvania, Nov. 19* h 1736. 
May it Please the Honorable Society : J 



In my last, I have done myself the pleasure of acquaint- 
ing the Hon' Society of my unexpected, as well as una- 
voidable necessity of being at Barhadoes, and and of my 
Return To this Province, where I have officiated, not only 
at Radnor, but at several! other places, for these five months 
past — whether this without mentioning the Several] Ex- 
traordinary fatigues, I have had & undergone will entitle me 
to at least three months Salary I Leave^ to the Hon* Socie- 
ties Discretion & pleasure — I am now preparing for the I 
Barhadoes & humbly bog Leave to Resign my Mission not 
without a grateful! sence of the Generous support 1 have 
so Long enjoyed, wishing the Hon 1,1 ' Society all Success 
Imaginable I remain their most Humble & obedient Servant 

Griffith Hughes. 



Friends 1 Burial-Ground, Burlington^ New Ja\<>y. 149 



FRIENDS' BURIAL-GKOUXJ), BUBLLN'GTOX, NEW 

JERSEY. 

BY ROWLAND J. DUTTON. 

(Continued from page GO.) 

The following extract is from the edition of the Dis- 
cipline of the Society published in 1834 : 

"It is the sense of this Meeting, that no monuments either of wood or 
stone be affixed to graves in any of our burial-grounds ; and if any yet 
remain therein that these be forthwith removed, so that no cause of 
uneasiness on this account may exist or partiality be justly chargeable 
upon us."— 170G-1733. 

By virtue of the above conclusion of the Yearly Meeting, 
a number of o-ravestones must have been removed from the 
burial-ground, and also a number buried beneath the sur- 
face, as during the past forty years or more there has been 
found a number of gravestones which the sextons put in 
position as nearly as possible to the spot where found, as 
curious mementos of the past. 

The largest one was allowed to remain in the position it 
was found in, — excepting the earth being removed from the 
top, — it being about eight inches below the general level of 
the ground. Those found and accessible are as follows: 

Tn Section VIII. , an old marble stone about twelve inches 
wide and two inches thick, marked 

Jacob Wvx lings 

1770 



About on the division-line between Sections X. and XI. 
is a large, flat, marble slab, which must have stood quite 



nit is now about eisjht inches below 



high above the ground 

the general level. It is about live feet long by two Ret 

broad and is inscribed as follows: 



150 FricmW B>trkd-Gro>.n><J, Burlington, New Jer$e$. 

On the 30th Jay of July 1754 died 
J OSKIMJ SCATIfJEjBC OOD . Esq. 

aged 40 i;ears 
And the next day was interred here 

He was a Husband Loving & Beloved 

A. Tender parent A. Kind Relative 

A. Sincere & faithful Friend a Good Master 

an Honest Man 
This Stone is placed over his Grave- 
by hio Mouniruil Widow as a Tribute 
Justly, due to his Memory 

In Section XIII. there fae three. One, brown sandstone, 
rough edges, six inches Wrde, one and one-half inches thick, 

marked 

D B 
J.72G 

One of soapstone, ten inches wide, two inches thick, 

marked 

a S.\ 

One of marble, about twenty inches wide and two inches 

thick : 

Here Was Laid y° 
Body of Abagel : y c 
Daughter of Joshua : 
and Sarah Raper, Who 
Dyed y e 3- day o.f. 
Feb r > 172 : ; Aged 
G Years. 

In Section XXI. is a soapstone about twelve inches wide, 
one and one-half inches thick: 

Here Lyeth the 
Body of A mar . . . 
Brown, who depa 
ltd this [Jle No 1 
• y e 11 th 1744 Aged 17 
years. 

1 Samuel Smith, "the Historian of Xew Jersey," it is supposed, was 
buried in this ground., but no record of such interment can be found. 
It maybe possible that tins old soapstone may have Km placed to mark 
his grave. 



JPiiends 9 Burial-Ground, jBarlfogfori, New Jersey. 151 

The Friends of the present day, having realized the de- 
sirability of being able to locate the various places oi in- 
terments of their relatives and friends, have modified the 
instructions as to the placing of stones at graves by adopt- 
ing the following clause in the last edition of the Book of 
Discipline, viz : 

"This Caution is not understood as prohibiting the marking of graves 
by simple unornamented stones at the head and foot of a grave, rising not 
more than six inches above the general level of the ground, and contain- 
ing only the name and age or date of birth and death of the person there 
interred inscribed upon the top of the stone." 



As to funds for the keeping up of the graves, this burial- 
ground is similarly situated, in that respect, to most, if not 
all, of the burial-grounds within the limits of the Yearly 
Meeting; that is to say, there is no fund existing to be used 
for that especial purpose, therefore the friends and relatives 
of those interred there usually, arrange with the sexton to 
see after keeping the graves in order, subject to the rules of 
the committee in charge. 

By reference to the photograph of the rear of the meet- 
ing-house, a considerable portion of the burial-ground will 
be found included in the picture. 

. The first row in the foreground is in Section VI., and is 
known as the " Deacon lvow." One of the four graves in 
front of the buttonwood tree on the left near the meeting- 
house is that of Br. Joseph W. Taylor, the founder of Bryn 
Mawr College. The group of graves on the right in the 
foreground is in Section XXL, and are of the Gummere 
families. The two rows in the centre, in front of the large 
buttonwood tree, are the Allinson, Molt, and Smith graves. 
Stephen 0J relict and his wife are buried in the same row as 
the Allinson family. Samuel and Margaret If. Hi lies are in 
the group near the centre of the wall on the left. Quite a 
number of 'graves are not seen in the .space im-hided in the 
picture, being obstructed from view by a rise in the sr round 



152 Friends' BarialrGround % Burh'ngto*, New Jersey. 

about midway. The panels on the wall, that ate visible, 
designate Sections YJI. to XIII., inclusive. 1 






Among those interred in these grounds, in whom there is 
perhaps more than a local interest, are the following: 

Samuel Hieles was a resident of AYilmiiurton, Delaware. 
He was the first superintendent of Haverford School, now 
llaverford College, aiienvards, with his elder brother, Eli, 
conducting a popular and successful boarding-school for 
girls in Wilmington. He was remarkably courteous and 
affable in his manners and conversation. His wife, Mar- 
garet II. , was the great-granddaughter u f James Loiran, of 
Stenton, near Philadelphia. They, at their request, were 
interred in the same grave. — Section JX. Xo. 87. 

Grace Buchanan. — An English nurse in the family of 
John Smith, father of John Jay Smith and Margaret II. 
Hilles, and who later carried on the business of druggist in 
Burlington, which business she had learned in England. — 
Section IX. No. 4. 

John Cox. — A prominent minister of the Society of 
Friends. His first wife was a sister of John Smith, and a 
granddaughter of James Logan, of Stenton. His second 
wife, Ann Dillwyn, was a sister of George Dillwyn. — Section 
IX. No. 23. 

Margaret (Hill) Morris. — A\ r as the wife of William 
Morris and daughter of Dr. Richard Hill, and sister of 
Henry Hill, a prominent merchant.. — Section VIII. No. 10. 
■ Milcah Martha Mooke. — A sister oi Margaret (Hill) 
Morris and daughter of Dr. Richard Dili. Her husband 
was Dr. dairies Moore. — Section 111. No. 18. 

Samuee Emlex. — A son of Samuel Emlen. the eminent 
minister of the Society in the latter part of the eighteenth 
century. His wife was a daughter of William Dillwyn. — 
Section IX. No. 10. 

l The writer is indebted to William II. Robert?, ot Moorestotra, New 
Jersey, ^for his kindly interest in preparing ami furnishing the photo- 
graph accompanying this paper. 



Friends Burial- Ground, BurUnyton, New Jersey. 153 

John Grjscom. — A prominent educator during most of 
his active life ; at one period being Professor of Chemistry 

in Columbia College, New York. His first wife was, the 
youngest daughter ol John Iloskins. Her oldest sister 
married " Thomas Scattergood, the minister/'' — Section XV. 
No.- 12. 

Margaret M, Smith. — A single woman, remarkably 
active in benevolent work in the community. She was a 
sister of Daniel B. Smith, formerly a prominent merchant 
of Philadelphia, and sacrificed her life through t]\Q nervous 
strain and exertions incident' to .her great kindness and 
hospitality to some entire strangers, who were injured at 
the time of the great railroad accident in Burlington, in 
the year 1855.— -Section VIII. No, 23. 

Samuel J. Smith. — A poet of some reputation. He was 
a grandson of Samuel Smith, whose name is well known 
as the author of " Smith's History of Xew Jersey." — Sec- 
tion IX. No. 20. 

Richard Mutt. — An' eminent minister of Friends,- for- 
merly residing at Mamaroneck, X. Y., but passed the latter 
years of his life with his grandson, Richard F. Mott. — Sec- 
tion IX. No. SO. 

Isaac Collins. — Printer and publisher. Was appointed 
printer to King George HI. for the Province of Xew Jersey 
in the year 1770. He was the publisher of the New Jersey 
Gazette, and also of many works, and a printer of the Pro- 
vincial Currency. — Section VIII. No. 0. 

Xathaxikl Coleman. — A silversmith in the early part of 
this eentury. There are doubtless quite a number of arti- 
cles of silverware still to bo found in the families whose 
ancestors formerly lived in Burlington and vicinity stamped 

N. COLEMAN. 

—Sec/ inn VI. No 17. 

John Hoskins, Si:n.— A prominent elder of the Society 
of Friends. Was father-in-law of Thomas Scattergood (the 
minister) and of John Grkscotn. — Section XV. No 1. 



154 D'kiuU* BarkrUGfroundf BurU 'nylon, KewJcrsty. 

James Kixsey. — Chief Justice of New Jersey. Was a 
member of Burlington Meeting. J lis usual seat in the 
meeting-house being in what is known as the " second 
gallery." lie married Hannah Dceou, whose sister was the 
wife of Jonathan Odell, rector of the Episcopal Church. — 
Section XV II. Xo. 1. 

Stephen Grellfl — An eminent minister of the Society 
of Friends, who travelled extensively in this country and 
in Europe, and whose missionary labors are fully recorded 
in his published memoirs. — Section VIII. Ko 24- 

Rebecca Greleet. — Wife of the above; was daughter of 
Isaac Collins, the printer and publisher. — Section VIII. 
Ko. SO. 

George Dieewyx. — A prominent minister in the early part 
of this century. — Action IX. Ko. 2. 

Susannah R. Smith.— A minister, daughter of Isaac 
Collins, the colonial printer and publisher. — Section IX. 
Ko. 38. \ 

Richard M. Smith. — Her husband, was a great-grandson 
of James Logan, of Stenton. — Section IX. Ko. 17-. 

Abigail Barker. — A highly esteemed minister, and the 
mother of Elizabeth B. Gunmierc, the wife of Samuel R. 
Gummere. — Section 2X1. Ko. 1. 

Jonx Gi'Mmere. — The proprietor 'of a widely known and 
popular boarding-school at Burlington, in fore part of this 
century. Among his pupils were numbers from the Island 
of Cuba, South America, as well as from various sections 
of the Union. In 1884 he became Superintendent of 
llaverford College. He was not only eminent as a teacher, 
but was a prominent mathematician, being the author <?V 
"Gummere's Astronomy and Surveying/'' as well as of 
other similar works. — Set-lion AX J. Kh 20. 

Samuel R. Gi'.mmkue. — A brother -of John ; was also a 
leading educator in his early and middle lite, his board- 
ing-school for girls being very popular. He built and 
Occupied what i> now the central part of St. Mary's Hall, 
which has for manv years been under the management of 



Friends' Bttrial-Grrouiid, Burlington, New Jersey. 155 

the Episcopal Ittocese of Xew Jersey as a young ladies 1 
seminary. He also was the author of various work^, and 
for many years Clerk in Chancery at Trenton, X. J. — Sec- 
tion XXL No. 99. 

Stephen Pike. — A teacher and the author of " Pike's 
Arithmetic," formerly used in schools. In earlier life he 
was a bookseller, but being conscientiously opposed to deal- 
ing in works of fiction, and finding his business unprofitable 
without keeping a stock of such works, he relinquished it 
and pursued the vocation of teaching. A painting by Wil- 
liam Strickland, in the f Jordan Annex" of the Pennsyl- 
vania Historical Society, representing " Christ Church," 
includes his store, showing the sign " Stephen Pike, Book- 
seller."— Section XXVL No. 5. 

Eliza Paul Guknev. — The widow of Joseph John Gur- 
ney, of Norwich, England, an eminent minister of the 
Society of Friends, was a woman of great personal worth, 
a generous benefactor, and a lovely Christian character. 1 — 
Section XX VI L No. 10. 

William Gummeke. — A son of John Gummcro, the 
mathematician, lie was an officer of the National Bank of 
the Northern Liberties, Philadelphia, for over fifty years; 
having, entered the bank as a clerk, lie rose successively to 
the office of president. At the close of his fifty years of 
service he was appointed president emeritus, which position 
he occupied until his death. — Section XXL No. 50. 

Peter Hill, — AVas a " Colored Clockmaker." He was 
in the employ of the " Hollingsheads," who were prominent 
clockmakers in Burlington, and they taught him the trade. 
After their retirement from business he succeeded them. 
A number of his clocks are still in the neighborhood. His 
shop was on High Street, nearly opposite Friends' Meeting- 
House.— Sc<'>''.>/> XXVJ 1 1. No. 1. 

Caroline Lqango. — A vouitff African irirl, was brought 
from Loaugo, having been kidnapped by slave-traders in 

! A note addressed to her, from Abraham Lincoln, written during the ^ 

Kebellion, is in the possession of the Pennsylvania Historical Society. 



150 Friends' Bur kit- Ground, Burlington, New Jersey. 

the interior. She was purchased from them by the super- 
cargo of a vessel consigned, to Xcw York, as a waiting-maid 
for his wife, hut lie having dicii on the passage,.she was J 

sent to friends of the owners of tbe vessel living near Bur- j 

lington.— Section XXVII. No. 3. 

Samuel R. Vetherill (Section IV. No. 90), and others of 
tlie same name upon the record, were deseendents of Christo- 
pher AVetherill, one of the early proprietors of West Jersey. 

"William Ridgway.— A minister of the Society. In 
early life he was a sea- captain; at one period, trading to 
Europe and West Indies, in the interest of Smith & Ridg- 
way, of Philadelphia.— Section VII. No. 3. 

Thom.as Di'TiON. — Was a public-spirited man, upright 
and amiable in character. His useful life was cut short in 
early middle age. — Section VII. No. 15. 
. Buiut "Woolman. — Was Surveyor-General of West Jersey 
for a period of nearly forty years. — Section V. No. .57. 

George B. Deacon. — In early life an educator, connected 
with the young ladies' school of Samuel I\. Gum mere, and 
later prominently known in Horticultural and Pomological 



o- 



Societies. — Section VII. No. e*o. 

William J. Allixson. — Was a man of versatile talent. 
He located in Burlington as a dru££rist, hut the latter part 
of his life was devoted to literary pursuits, and was for a 
number of years editor of the " Friends' jRericw" since 
changed to the "American Friend" published in Philadel- 
jitAfL--Scettoi VIII. No. 36. 

The following is a list of the. interments from about the 
the year 182$, as well as of those whose names the old sex- 
tons were aide to give who were interred before that date. 
Prior to that dale, they are nundteeed in each section as they 
were obtained from the old sextons, but, subsequently, they 
have been put down as they were entered upon the "Book 
of Record," without attention to their position upon the 
plan, so tar as regards the order of the numbers. 1 

1 A copy of the plan has been placed in the luvonl-ro-mi at Friend*' 
Library, on Sixteenth Street above Cherry Street, tor preservation. 






Frihids' J3".ri'l-Groi'/'.J, Burlington, Nod Jersey 157 



SECTION I 

No 1 Sarah Wool man 

2 Huldah William.- 

3 Lydia Bullock 

4 Stokes 

5 Marv Buck man 





SECTION II 


No 1 


Aaron QuieksaH 


2 Mary Mi lues 


3 


Margaret QuieksaH 


4 Child of John Birkey Jr 


5 


" " Chas W Gunnell 


6 


Charles Sinclair 


7 


Patience Ashburn 


S Lydia Harris 


9 


Hannah Hartshorn 


10 John Hartshorn 


11 


Benjamin QuieksaH 


12 


Kebeeca QuieksaH 


13 Sarah Sinclair 


14 


Sarah Quicksali 


15 


Rebecca QuieksaH Jr 


16 


Chas Gun ceil 


17 


John Quick-ail 


IS 


John Birkey 


19 


Job Remington 


20 


William QuieksaH 


21 


Mary Ann Knight 


22 


Keturan Gunnell 


23 


John Q Birkey 


24 


Elizabeth H Birkey 


25 Edward B Gunnel! 



Jonathan Knidit 
Elizabeth W Cellars 



SECTION" III 

No 1 Mary King 

2 Anna King 

3 Rhea, King 

4 Joshua B Smith 

5 Abram Stockton 



G John Antrim 

7 Abram Stockton Jr 

8 Scth Gibbs 

9 Wife of No S 

10 Henrietta Swiggctt 

11 Mary Elizabeth Swiggett 

12 Deborah Hicks 

13 Milcah Martha .Moore 

14 Margaret .Smith wife of W" 

15 Elizabeth llicks 

16 Deborah Prosscr 

17 Barzilla Prosscr 

IS Child of Chas Atherton 

19 Christopher Wetherill 

20 Isaac Wetherill 

21 Margaret Wetherill 

22 Joseph It King 

23 Thomas Wetherill 

24 Sarah Earl 

25 Paper Smith 

2G Elizabeth Kennirnorc 

27 Alfred L Smith 

28 Susan J Smith 

29 Mary Atherton 

30 Martha Prosscr 

31 Elizabeth Prosper 

32 William \V King 

33 George G King 

34 Esther' K Smith 

35 Edward Smith 
SO John Miller 

37 Anna M Miller 
3S Mary A Cummings 

39 Robert J Smith 

40 Joseph H Smith 

41 Catharine Smith 

42 Elizabeth Cuuuaiugi 

43 Lucy King 

44 William G King 
43 William W Miller 
40 Susan D Smith 

47 Eleanor K Shoiwell 

48 Sarah C Miller 

49 Sarah U Smith 



15S Fi'icmh* B"r>'f-Gr')>',)d, tkuihiglotii Xcte Jcr.st;/. 





SUCTION IV 


No l 


Child of Saml R Wetheri 


2 


Mary Wetherill 


3 Joseph Wetherill 


4 


Mercy Wetherill 


5 


Jacob Myers Jr (Capt) 


6 


Wife of Peter Sit man 


7 


Wife of Jacob Myers Sen 


8 Jacob 3 [vers Sen 


9 


Thomas Deacon (farmer) 


10 Mother of do 


11 


Same family 


12 Henry Burr Sen 


13 


Amy Wilson 


14 


No one 


15 


Sarah Pitt man 


16 


Thomas Deacon (mason) 


17 


Mary Pittman 


18 


Bobert Pittman 


19 


Catharine Pittman 


20 


Samuel R Wetherill 


21 


Ann E Wetherill 


90 


Samuel Shreeve 


23 


Fanny Pittman 



SECTION V 

No 1 John II Fennimore 

2 William Myers 

3 Elizabeth Walton 

4 Bar/ilia Deacon 
b Job Deacon 

C Samuel Norcross 

7 James Deacon 

8 Child of Henry Rid-way 

9 Abraham Scott 

10 Wife of do 

11 Daughter of do 

12 Catharine Deacon 

13 Sister of No 12 

14 John Deacon (Carpenter) 

15 Wife of No 11 



1G 
17 
IS 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
2G 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
A 
43 
44 
45 
4G 
47 
4S 
49 



50 



Robert New ton 

Samuel Newton 

William Gaskill 

Samuel ftogers (Carpenter) 

Amy Rogers & Gram! Child 

Purr Woolman 

Rebecca G Cfaskill 

Charles H Paste 

William Deacon (Captain) 

Amos H Deacon 

William Deacon 

Elizabeth Deacon 

Parmelia Deacon 

George Deacon (Joiner) 

Hannah Newton 

Rebecca Deacon 

David Deacon 

Rachel Woolman 

Elizabeth Gaskil! 

George Gaskill 

Abby Deacon 

Elizabeth Woolman 

Hannah Norcross. 

Martha Deacon 

Caleb Gaskill 

Thomas 15 Woolman 

Achsah Deacon 

Mercy Deacon 

Prisci'lla II Lloyd 

Ann Williams 

Phebe Williams 

Anna 11 Gaskill 

Mary G King 

William C Woolnun 

Anna Wilson King 
( Infant child of 
j Dr J Hunter Robb 
< (Thomas Woolman 
I Rol-b) interred between 
I Nes 37 &41 



Notk.— Ill this section tho wo-: rows are 
Irregular, aii<1 N>->. : •. :'•>. >'. 7. unU S over- 
lap the row in which n:*.- No*, II, .'. .". wid 
21. No. is runs over the l.i»t row. 



Friends 1 BunaUGroandj Burlhgtoti, New Jo 



■i. 



159 



SECTION VI 

So 1 Child of John Deacbii 

2 Gulielma Deacon 

3 Widow Shiner 

4 Caleb Steven-on 

5 Benjamin Stevenson 
C Samuel G Deacon 

7 Lydia M Deacon 

8 Keturah Deacon 

9 Charles T Deacon 

10 John Elton 

11 Wife of John Elton 

12 Henry Dowel 1 

13 Susan Nicholson 

14 John Taylor 

15 Wife of John Taylor 

16 Elizabeth Coleman 

17 Nathaniel Coleman 

18 Hannah E Deacon 

19 John Deacon 

20 Child of Ezra Stevenson 

21 Thomas Smith 

22 Scth Smith 

23 Martha Smith 

24 George Sidney Deacon 
'25 Not found 

20 Mary Lippincott 

27 Rebecca E Deacon 

28 Carrie Deacon 

29 Hannah Deacon 

30 Elizabeth W Deacon 

31 Ann }> Deacon 

32 John C Deacon 

33 Kesiah Deacon 

34 Grace Smith 
3-UMary Deacon 

35 Georgre R Deacon 
30 Maria W Deacon 
37 Eliza A Ellis 

SECTION' VII 

No 1 Hannah Ellison 

2 Elizabeth Ellison 

3 William Ridjrwav 



4 Deborah D Ridgv'ay 

5 Hannah Elton Dufton 

.Charles Ilidgway Dixtton 

7 Edith Laurie Ji 

8 Edith Laurie 

9 Mary Ridgway 

10 Eliza R Bishop 

11 .Mary L Thomas 

12 Amelia Thomas 

13 Joseph M Laurie 

14 George Dutton 

15 Thomas Dutton 

•10 Child of Elton Thomas 

17 Elton Thomas 

IS William P2 Thomas 

19 Rebecca Thomas 

20 Hannah D Ellis & Child 

21 Susan N Wistar 

22 Lucy Ann Laurie 

23 William R Dutton 

24 Robert Thomas 

25 Louisa H Bisliop 
20 Mary M I'^hop 
27 William Bishop 
2S Sarah J Dutton 

SECTION' VIII 

No 1 William Allinson 

2 Martha Allinson 

3 John Allinson 

4 James Allinson 

5 Richard Hill Morris 
Thomas A Collins 

7 Charles Collins 

8 Deborah Cull ins 

9 Isaac Collins 
Margaret (Hill) Morris 
Mother of Richard Hill 

Morris 
Supposed William Morris 
husband of Margaret 
(Hill) Mom-; 

13 Ann Ccilliiu 

14 Child of Edmund Morris 



12 



1G0 D'i.eml* BurkL&rowid, BarVvgiofi, New Jerky. 



15 Mary S Morris wife of Rich' 1 

Hill Morris 
1G William Allinson son of 

\V J Allinson 
17jAlired A Trimble 
IS Mehetable Herbert 

19 Samuel llilles Howland 

20 William P Trimble 
'21*"Aibert Collins 

22 Sibyl Allinson 

23 Margaret 31 Smith 

24 Stephen Grellet 

25 Elizabeth Allinson 
2G Margaret Parker 

27 David Allinson 

28 Thomas Collins 

29 William Albert Collins 

30 Rebecca Grellet 

31 Fanny Collins 

32 Mary Allinson 

33 Lucy Allinson 

34 Eliza W Hinchman 

35 Edmund Morris 

36 William J Allinson 

37 Mary P Morris widow of 

Edmund 
3S Rebecca W Allinson widow 
of W J 

39 Margaret E Morris 

40 Elizabeth M Smith 

41 Lucy Allinson 

42 Dillwyn Smith 

Note.— -I'll! v.-;. n Smith, No. 12, \\»3 first 
interrd in S<vt;oa IX., but his remains 
wore afterwards removed and placed hy 
bis wife, No. 10. which aceuunti for his 
name beir.g entered after lha: of his wife, 
she having outlived him. 



SECTION IN 

No 1 Sarah Dillwyn 

2 George Dillwyn 

3 Susan Erulen 

4 Grace Buchanan 



5 Susan Allinson 

G John Smith Hither of Rich' 

M 
•7 Gulielma Smith 

8 Wife of Daniel Smith sen r 

9 Daniel Smith sen r 

10 Robert Smith 

11 Sarah Smith sifter of No 10 

12 Daniel Smith father of Caleb 

13 Mary Smith sister of No 12 

14 Ann Cox 

15 Joseph & John Parrish's 

Children 
1G Samuel Emlen 
17 Richard M Smith 
IS Gulielma Stewardson 

19 Hannah Smith 

20 Samuel J Smith ; 

21 Martha Smith 

22 Joseph Smith lather of Sam 

J 

23 John Cox 

24 Jane R Smith 

25 Joseph R Smith 
20 Hannah D Smith 

27 Catharine Smith 

28 Deborah Rarrish 
20 Abigail Molt 

30 Richard Mott 

31 Amelia Smith 

32 Robert T Mott 

33 Anna R Mott 

34 Hannah R Mott 

35 Caleb R Smith 
3G Rarvilla C Smith 

r Samuel 1 lilies ) 
& 

37 \ his wife 

Margaret S 
I Hitler J 

38 Susannah R SuiitL 
30 Susan T Mtftl 
40 Richard F Mott 




Friends 9 Burial-Ground, Burlington. New; Jersey. 161 



section x 

No 1 Joseph Scatter-good 

2 Paul Jenness 

3 Mary II Jcniiess 

4 Not found 

5 John T Troth 

6 Elizabeth T Troth 

7 Mark Jenness 

8 Child of Charles GilTord 

9 Helen Boyd 

10 Mary Morrison 

11 Susan Boyd 

12 Mary Morgan 

13 Anna E Morrison 

SECTION XI 

No 1 Beulah West 

SECTION XII 

No 1 Joseph D Drinker 

2 Wife of No 1 

3 Daughter of do 

- — 4 Thomas Pancoast 

5 Stephen Morris 
. 6 Bersheba Morris 

7 William Letchworth 

8 .Wife of No 7 

9 Mary James 

10 Daniel Drinker 

11 Wife of No 10 

12 Puith Morris 

13 Mary Butcher 

14 Samuel Butcher 

15 Infant child of Joshua Eyre 
1G Martha Butcher 

17 Joshua W Eyre 

SECTION XIII 

No 1 Isaac Shoemaker 

2 Dr Joseph W Tuylor 

3 Elizabeth C Taylor dan of 

W C Taylor 

4 Hannah Taylor 

5 Nathan Taylor 

VOL. XXIV. — 11 



No 1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

No 1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

No 1 
2 



5 
C 

No 1 



SECTION XIV 

Lydia lloskins 

KacheU Joskins 

Susan D Criscom 

Edward Dennis 

Charles Hopkins 

Mary Griscom 

Amos George 

Mary II George wife of No 7 

William Dennis 

SECTION XT 

John Hoskms sen 

Wife of No 1 

Child of John Hoskins Jr 

John Hoskins Jr 

Martha Hoskins 

Elizabeth Griscom 

John Wilson 

Joseph Pearce 

Rachel Pearce 

Hannah Pearce 

Mary Pearce 

John Griscom 

Joseph W. Griffith 

Susan Griffith wife of No'lo 

Martha Taylor 

Eliza Taylor 

SECTION XVI 

Martha Jones 

Sarah S Jones 

Bow land Jones 

Unknown 

Unknown 

f Charlotte N Shreeve 

I Child of Joseph Shreeve 

SECTION XVII 

James Kinsev 



SECTION XVIII 

No 1 J<\~cph Antrim 

2 Hannah Antrim 

3 Wife of James Craft 

4 James Craft 



1G2 Friends' Burial -Ground, Burlington, Kac Jersey. 



5 Gershorn Cm ft 

6 Hannah Antrim 

7 Child of Dr Howard 

SECTION XIX 

No 1 Jediah Hause 

2 Wife of No 1 

3 Will- of KobcrtGrubbS.cn' 

4 Robert Grubb Sen r 

5 Lydia Brown 

6 Thomas Booth 

7 Mary Grubb 

8 Mary Brown 

9 Sarah Eustis 
10 George S Booth 

■ 11 Child of Benj u Gauntt 

in tt .a it k 

■to tt tt tt tt 

14 Benjamin Gauntt 

15 Thomas E Antrim 
1G William Brown 
17 Susan W Gauntt 



10 Mary Allfi Vanhorn 

1 7 Kachel Cost ill wife of Benj n 

18 Isaac S Haloes M 1) 
ft Okey II C'ostiH M D 

20 Benjamin Costill 

21 Mary Costill 

22 Ann B GriMith 

23 Anna S Griflith 

24 Hannah Vivian 

25 Hannah Leaver 
2G Hannah Atkinson 

27 Mary Risley 

28 Lydia Ellis 
20 Uriah Costill 

30 William Sleeper 

31 Susau W Burr 

32 Joseph B Haines l 

33 Edith A Sleeper 

34 John S Griffith 

iThe remains of Joseph R. Haines, No. 

32, have been removed to the Odd Fellows 
Cemetery. 

SECTION XXI 



No 









No 1 A 


Lbaga 


ill Barker 


SECTION XX 














2 Peter 


B>arker 




'Hannah P Morris wife 


of 


3 Isabella Gummere 




Samuel B Morris her 


re- 






f danph of 


1 . 


mains were afterward 


re- 


4 Kachel Gummere ■ , ,° « 
i John G 


moved to Friends West 


ern 


5 Name 


not known 




B Ground lb'th & K 


ace 






r widow of 




Sts Phila 




G Itachc 


1 Gummere < Saml G 


2 Not known 








• I Scu r 


3 " " 




7 Samuel Gummere Sen r 


4 " ' tt 




8 c 


k>sq» 


l Lewis 


5 " " 




9 Jacob 


Be wis 


6 Ellis Haines 




10 


• 




7 Wife of No G 




11 






8 Sarah Farniington 




12 




Formerly 


9 Sister of- No S " 




13 




John Folwell 


10 Phcbc Farmington 




14 




family 


11 Joseph Costill 




15 < 




and 


12 Wife of No 11 




1G 




now in 


13 Samuel Costill' 




17 




Section XXII 


14 Kachel Costill 




18 




by new division 


15 


Wife of Uriah Costill 




19 







Frie/ulS fytriah Ground, BurHtigton, Xew Jersey. 163 



20 
21 



22 



23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

30 

31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
3C 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
4G 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 



John Gummere 

William sou of Wm Denni. 



f tlaug 

of 



Elizabeth Gummere . 

John 

G. 

Charles son of Win Dennis 
Mayberry McVaugh 
Abby nedtuend 
Edward Gummere 
Lydia McVaugh 
Elizabeth B Gummere 
Samuel K Gummere 
f is in Section XXII and 
1 numbered 1 1 1 
Abigail Costill 
Mary V\ r Bunting 
"Martha M Gummere 
Philip M Redmond 
Rachel W Buzby 
Martha Costill 
Elizabeth 1) Gummere 
Howard A Hunt 
Frances G Mar^h 
Abel Buzby 
Amy B Vanhorn 
Charles J Gummere 
Christianna Marsh 
Susan B Dennis 
Hannah Haines 
Benjamin V. Marsh 
Henrietta E Buzby 
Mary Gummere 
Mary Ann Barton 
"William Gummere 
John G Gummere 



SECTION' XXII 

No 1 Theodocia Craig 

2 Andrew Craig 

3 John Buzby 

4 William Buzby 

5 Ann Ogburn 

0» Hannah Randolph 



7 William Borroughdail 

8 Will; of Xo 7 

9 Hannah King 

lOj Elizabeth English 
1H Nathan English 

10 John Folwell 

11 Wife of Xo 10 
12 
13 
14 
15 
1G 
17 
18 

19 r 

20 Rebecca W Buzby 

21 Susan Abbott 

22 Lvdia Stokes 



} Same Family 





SECTION XXIII 


Xo 1 


Susan Cox 


2 


Rachel Cox 


3 


Wife of Thomas Hall ' 


4 John Hall 


5 


Meribah Hall 


6 Church family 


7 


<( a 


8 Xot found 


9 


Fer.nimore family 


10 


Wife of Samuel Rodman 


11 


Rodman family 


12 


(i (< 


13 


ii > < 


14 


<( n 


15 


«< ii 


1G 


{< «< 


17 


<< ii 


18 


i< ii 


19 


Robert Coe 


20 Jane Coe 


21 


William Coe 


22 


Thomas Hall 


23 


Richard Ilea ton 


24 


Ann M Cox 



1G-1 Prtaills 9 Baridl-Ground, Burlington^ New Jersey. 



25 Alexander Craft 

26 Emlen Craft 

27 Francis Asbury Reed 
26 Joseph Sholl • 

29 A Lincoln Sholl 

SECTION XXIV 

No 1 Abel James 

2 Daughter of No 1 

3 Daughter of Kobert Annou 

4 Amos Annon 

5 Kobert Annon 

6 Thomas Hutchin 

7 James Hutchin 

8 Amos Hutchin 

9 Ann Tyson 

10 Hannah Hutchin 

11 Ann Moon 

12 Benjamin Moon 

13 Ja>per Moon 

14 Wife of No 13 

15 Peter Dowell 

SECTION XXV 

No 1 Isaac Archer 

2 Son of No 1 

3 Elizabeth Smith 

4 Same family 

5 Elizabeth Newbold 
C Anthony X Taylor 
7 CatleU* 

on XXVI and 



f is in Section 
I numbered 1 5 



9 Susannah Xewbold 

10 Mary X Stroud 

11 Elizabeth P Xewbold 

12 ( is in Section XXVI and 



f is in Section 

I numbered l-i 
,., f is in Sectioi 
1 numbered \>) 



is in Section XXVI and 
3 
14 William F. Xewbold 



Nod. S, 12, and 13 were gauged by present 

division of 1ol-> in 1^7:;. 



SECTION XXVI 

No 1 Saimiel Emlen's Englishman 

2 Elizabeth Sloan 

3 Child of J M Bacon 

4 Sarah Scattergood wife of 

Thomas (the minister) 

5 Stephen Pike 

6 Child of Stephen Pike 

7 Sarah Burgess 

8 Esther E Taylor 

9 Child of Samuel W Taylor 

10 Hannah Child of Samuel 

W Taylor 

11 Mary Potts 

12 Edward Taylor 

13 Sarah V,' Dugdale 

14 Thomas Dugdale 

15 Ann Bacon 

1G Eliza Y Taylor 

17 Amy Kichardson 

18 Sarah M Dugdale 

19 Elizabeth D Taylor 

20 Eliza P Yardiev 

21 George Eugene Yard ley 

22 Mary K Taylor 

23 Samuel W Taylor 

24 Mcreianna Y Taylor 

SECTION XXVII 

No 1 Thomas Winner 

2 Thomas Allinsoa 

3 Julia K Choke 

4 Piehard M Kirkbride 

5 Mary Ann Williams 
C Charles K Cloud M I) 
7 Ann Eliza Kirkbride 
S Elsie Cioud 

9 Eleanor G Kirkbride 

10 Eli/a Paul Guruey 

SECTION XXVIII 

No 1 IVtei'llill 

2 Graud'Child of Edith Green 

3 Can 4 i no L.-ar 

4 Joseph K Wiliiauu 



The Pcnas and U-.e Ta cotton of tfteir E&kctes, 165 



THE PEXXS AX\P THE TAXATION OF TIIEJK ESTATES 
BY TirE PROVINCIAL ASSEMBLY. 

(Continued from Vol. XXIII. page 443.) 

Two branches tlierefore of the proprietary es- 
tate consist of: 

1 That purchase money which persons pay Purchase 

1 , v l . money. 

to the proprietaries to purchase a grant in fee 
of any parcel of lands they desire to have 
granted to them ; and — 

2 The quit-rent of an half penny per acre O**™* 
reserved on those grants in fee and as the com- 
mon run of grants do not one with another 
exceed 200 acres (which is a good farm) each, 

such purchasers may be. to pay eight shillings 
and four pence per annum quit-reut. 

8 And the proprietaries have a third sort of Unsold lands, 
estate there, I mean all the unsold lands within 
the province. The charter granted to Mr. Penn 
all the lands and soil within the bounds therein 
mentioned. But Messrs. Penns have considered 
that grant rather as a licence from the Crown 
to purchase in those lands from the Indian 
natives and proprietors than as a title to the 
Indian lands and therefore have constantly and 
honestly and in some cases twice or three times 
over bought in i'ruin the Indians and paid them 
for every inch of the country which the Indians 
have been willing to sell before, ever they have 
occupied or granted out any part thereof. 

Out of that land, thus purchased from the 
Indians, the proprietaries something survey some 
parts thereof to reserve as a demesne for their 



I 

i 

166 The P&iH and the Taxation of their Estates. 

own use, cither to occupy themselves or to 
lease out or to sell for the riiost they can. 

These lands thus surveyed and reserved for 
the proprietaries own future disposition are in 
three different circumstances which are neces- 
sary to be distinctly stated in order to show 
what the question between the proprietaries 
and the Assembly as to these lands is. . . 

Leased lands. 1 ' Sonic part of these lands are actually let 
out on leases for years to the tenants and occu- 
piers of the same at the best rents that can be 
got and as to those the proprietaries consented 
by their instructions that they should be taxed, 
duly they contend to raise the tax upon the 
annual value and distrain the possession as in 
England and let him deduct a proportionable 
part thereof from his rent payable to the pro- \ 

prietaries. 

surveyed and 9 A second part of these lands surweved and . 

reserved , . . . " 

lands settled reserved tor the proprietaries is not leased or . 

by Indians. g ran ted' out by them to any persons whatsoever, 
nor yield them a single farthing of annual rent 
or profit notwithstanding which it happens that 
numbers of intruders seat themselves down upon 
them from time to time at their own pleasure 
and make some little improvements, but are not 
yet brought under any lease or pay any rent 
for their settlements and there are so many set- 
tiers upon those reserved lands that for every 
three hundred (300) acres of them there is at 
least one tenant or fatnilv. now these surveyed 
and reserved lands will certainly be called, at 
least by the peoples' assessor improved lands for 
the tenants and intruders have actually made 
some sort oi % improvement upon the same and 
* they may be called the proprietaries improved 
lands; the taxing these sort oi % lands at all and 



The Peitns and the Taxation of fkeir Estate* 



16" 



the manner of taxing the same make the great 
and grievous oppression, for as to lands Which 
are let out at certain rents the value may be 
known by the rent-payable lor the same. And 
as to the lands located but not improved or 
occupied at all the Act lays thus far: a limited 
value upon them that they shall be valued 
from 5 to 15 shillings the hundred acres but as 
to these sort of lands reserved for the proprie- 
taries and not granted to but occupied by these 
intruders, the assessor is to set whatever value 
he thinks fit upon them at his arbitrary will and 
pleasure and assess so much in the pound upon 
that imaginary value, and this without any possi- 
bility of redress, suppose he should value them 
at £300 per hundred acres, for so the Assembly 
in some of their papers most ridiculously imagine 
them to be. Then the estimated value of 100.000 
acres of such land would be £300.000, and four 
shillings in the pound upon that value would 
be £60.000 tax per annum for land which does 
not pay or produce to the proprietories one sin- 
gle farthing of rent or profit. The iniquity and 
injustice of this proposition glares one in the face. 
For by this means the proprietaries alone may 
be taxed to the amount of nine-tenths or even 
to a. greater proportion of any land-fax which 
the Assembly may lay upon the whole province 
and that for such land only as yeikls them no 
rent or profit whatsoever. This therefor the 
proprietaries never will submit to. The As- 
sembly say that these lands are kept in hand 
undisposed of by the proprietories in order that 
by other persons improving circumjacent lands 
these may grow more valuable and may- fetch 
a higher price and that therefore though* they 
yeild now no rent or profit they may grow more 



168 



The Pt'in* and the Taxation, of their Estates. 



Surveyed lands 
occupied. 



advantageous and may sell for a Letter price by 
and by, but that' ia all eventual, they may as 
well, nay they have decreased in value, there is 
no want of other lands for people to take up at 
pleasure in other places upon x\l<c common terms'' 
and the proprietaries are judges of their own 
interest and their own property and it cannot 
be imagined that thev are so very blind to their 
own interest as to keep these lands unlet, unsold 
and to yield them no kind of profit whatever, 
rather than to sell or let them for considerable 
value if they could find tenants or purchasers 
for them. And all this for fear that the lands 
(after that they have sold or let them) should be 
taxed. 

3 The third and last part of these surveyed 
and reserved lands are such small parts (not 
very considerable) as lie wholly untennanted 
and unoccupied and unimproved. 

As to other lands in the province bought from 
the Indians but not surveyed or reserved for the 
proprietaries' use, they are in the like circum- 
stances with those which are reserved for the 
proprietaries' use. viz. some granted out, some 
not granted out but yet intruded upon and 
other parts wholely vacant and unoccupied and 
open for any person that pleases to take up any 
part of them on the known common and usual 
terms of purchase and of these there is always 
a sufficient quantity for the settlers that offer. 
The purport of These lands would all in general have been 

the Land-lax , , . T , rp . .. w . _ - „. 

Act passed in taxed by the Land-lax Acts 01 J<oo and ltot 

Pennsylvania gome c f t ] iein j n ( , no lnaimor others of them in 
in November 

another manner had not the proprietary Vs 
estates been excepted out of the tax on account 
of their then <r\\\ f £5000 to. the King's use, 
for the first cnaetini? words of the Act are that 



1755. 



The Pains ami the Taxation of their Etftatei 



169 



the tax shall be levied upon all the estates real 
and personal within this province of all all and 
every person and persons. 

- As to such of these reserved lands as yeild 
rent the proprietaries consented as aforesaid 
that they might he taxed. But as to the far 
greatest part which yield no rent or profit at all 
to the proprietaries those also must, by these 
Acts, have been taxed as follows : 

Where owners of land whereon improvements 
arc made don't reside in the district where the 
land lies, not only the goods of the tenant but 
those of the landlord also shall be destrained 
for the tax and if the tenant prays it he shall 
have an action of debt for the same with costs 
against the owner of the land : proviso, not to 
alter contracts between landlord and tenant. 

Another sort of provision is made by the same 
Act for other lands, viz. whereas large tracts 
of valuable land have been located and held 
without intention of improvement but merely in 
expectation of receiving hereafter higher prices 
for private advantage, by means whereof those 
lands remain uncultivated and the which lands 
were exempted by the County Levy Act and 
cannot by the laws now in being be taxed, it is 
thought reasonable on this occasion to settle the 
manner. by which those lands shall be assessed 
and rated : Ergo it is enacted that all such located" 
and unimproved lands shall be valued at not 
exceeding £15 or under £5 per hundred acres 
and such lands shall be sold for payment of the 
tax thereon. "Who is to judge what lands are 
located and held with such intention and with 
such expectation ? The infallible assessor ? This 
must include all the lands purchased from the 
Indians and actually surveyed and reserved for 



170 The Pt,u<s ami the Taxation of their E«taks. 

the proprietaries' use. It also includes all the 
lands ever bought from the Indians and not 
granted away although not reserved for the pro- 
prietaries' use, fur every foot of those lands are 
in the terms of the Act located, the Indians sell 
the lands from such a place to such another 
place, they are held by the proprietaries and they 
remain uncultivated. Wherefore by the Act, 
although vacant lands are not taxed in other 
provinces as yielding no profit, yet these shall be 
taxed at the assessors' discretion as of the value 
from £5 to £15 the hundred acres. And if the 
proprietaries do not pay that tax sell the land 
itself to pay it. This is thought to be very un- 
just and oppressive. 

There is in the Act a pretended reason given 
for taxing these sort of lands now for that by 
means of these lands being so kept up they re- 
main uncultivated and great numbers of people 
have been necessitated to leave the province and 
settle in other colonies where lands are more 
easily purchased to the manifest injury and 
charge of the public. Xow there cannot be a 
more shameless and abominable falsehood in- 
vented than this is, which this Assembly have 
audaciously inserted in their Act against known, 
notorious and manifest facts. For there is not 
in all America any province that is for its size 
so populously and thickly settled as Pennsyl- 
vania and the Land Oiliee is always open with 
land to supply persons who desire to settle upon 
the constant known terms. With this addi- 
tional circumstance in favor of this province that 
by buying in the land from time to time of the 
Indians and by reserving a* quit-rent per aCre 
from settlers. J Tore are no great stragling 
grants made of large territories and sjreat tracts 



The Poms o,xl the Taxation of their Estates. 171 

of Innd (as in some other provinces) whereby 
the tenants and settlements are stretched and ex- 
tended wide from each other, here a tenant and 
a mile or two off another tenant, but flic grunts 
are made duly of mere improvable farms of two 
hundred or at most three hundred acres each and 
those united and compacted close together in a 
bodyasfarasthesettlements hitherio made extend. 

And another provision is made by tlie same 
Act that persons residing in the provinces who 
have seated themselves on largo tracts of land 
and neither have property therein or pay rent 
for the same but yet hold and occupy parts 
thereof shall pay taxes for the same in like man- 
ner as the freeholders are liable to do by virtue 
of this Act and for non-payment shall be liable 
to distress and imprisonment as the freeholders 
were by virture ol this Act or of the County 
Levy Act. 

These lands before mentioned made the third 
branch of the proprietaries' estate: 

But the Assemblv have found out a fourth Thc P*°P*>** 

•)•-,/» i'^i • -i • ^ r "-' s fourth 

kind oi estate then-tor the proprietaries audit kimiof prop- 
It was so have taxed it with a vengeance They "V' h . f t °. UI ! d 

O J out by the As- 

say in some of their long-winded messages or sombiy. 

reports that the proprietaries have vast sums of 
money due to them and standing out on mort- 
gages there. And they tax by thc self same 
Acts personal as well as real estates, indeed so 
does every Land-Tax Act in England do; but we 
shall fmd the Assembly's pretence is not true, 
and if ever so true that no such tax as they say 
was ever laid anywhere. And first as to the 
fact itself the proprietaries have no mortgages 
in the province. What the Assembly mean is 
this: A man sets down of his own head upon 
a piece of laud, when the proprietaries find him 



172 The Perms and the Taxation of their Estates. 

out they threaten to eject him if he will not buy 
or take a lease of it. lie is poor yet and cannot 
pay his whole £10 for a hundred acres but pays 
£3 or more or less in part of his purchase money. • 
Thereupon the proprietaries issue out a warrant 
' to their surveyor reciting' that A. B. desiring to 
purchase so many acres at such a place at the 
usual purchase and quit-rent has paid down so 
much money in part of Ins purchase therefore 
ordering the surveyer to survey and lay out a 
plot of such a quantity of lands at such a place. 
for the intending purchasor they give him no 
grant or estate in that land. He does not exe- 
cute any counterpart of the warrant or any con- 
tract or agreement whatsoever to pay the money 
or complete his purchase. But having done 
thus much the proprietaries suffer him to con- 
tinue as tenant at will on the land but give him 
no sort of title to it. By and by he picks up 
money and pays in the residue of his money if 
lie pleases and interest for it from the time he 
began to pay for it, when he has done this com- 
pletely then and not before the proprietaries give 
him a grant for his land in fee; this residue of 
the purchase money is no mortgage, he did not 
first pay down the money, and then the proprie- 
taries lend it him back again, he could give no 
mortgage for he himself liad no interest in the 
lands to make a mortgage of them. lie has 
efiven no bond, note or contract to pav the resi- 
due of money nor can ever be compelled to pay 
it. He may not like to complete his purchase 
and may leave it ami never make his purchase 
and the proprietaries have no remedy to com- 
pel! him to pay it, they may turn him oil the 
land and that is all they can do >o that this is 
no mortgage either in name or in substance and 

l 



T/ic Penos and the Taxation of their Estates. 17; 

it would be most unconscionable to lay any 
present tax whatever upon money which a man 
may or may not at many years distance happen 

to receive but never lias received or seen and 
has no title to or security for at the time you 
lay a tax upon it this is the purchase money 
paid or to he paid for the land and is in the 
same case with the fines before treated of. You 
tax the land itself, would you also tax the money 
too ? And even before it is received or receiva- 
ble: this is doubly taxing the same thing. But 
secondly, if this was a mortsrasrc or was anvthinir 
that is proper to be taxed, after what rate would 
you tax it ? Why, say the Assembly, you must 
pay four shillings in the pound, that is one fifth 
part of the capital for what you have no security 
at all but which may or may not many years 
hence be paid to you. So I must pay tax 
Twenty pounds this year for every hundred 
pounds personal estate, which I am no way in- 
titled to receive (and most certainly shall not re- 
ceive these ten or fifteen years or longer). This 
is most enormous and unjust and the English 
Acts of Parliament in laying a four shilling tax 
upon personal estates consisting of ready money, 
real debts, actual mortgages, &c. lay it upon the 
interest only (not upon the capital) of such cer- 
tain personal estate and say in express terms that 
for every £100, of such personal estate, the per- 
son taxed shall pay twentv shillings. The 
Pennsylvania Act says per contra for every one 
hundred pounds which you are not nor ever 
may be entitled to, you shall pay twenty shillings 
— such is their justice and way of proceeding 
to rob their proprietaries for such estates as this 
and such money as this falls within no other per- 
son's case but the proprietaries in any degree. 



174 The Pants ami the Tamttoa of their Estates. 

Having now given you an account of the nature and kind 
of all the proprietaries' e^taten in Pennsylvania and which 
in the whole are of infinitely less value and hear no kind 
of proportion to wiiat is generally imagined and also an 
account of the nature and purport of the Land-Tax Act 
passed by t)iv Assembly there in Xovcmber 1755 out of 
which Act they did then vouchsafe to exempt the proprie- 
taries' estate on account of their free gift of £5000. to the 
King's use, it comes next in course to show what commands 
and instructions the proprietaries afterwards gave in May 

175G to Col Denny their present Lieutenant Governor, viz. : 

. 
commission to « Thomas Perm and Richard Penn true and 

Lieut. Gov- 
ernor Denny, absolute proprietories and governors-in-chief of 
7th May 1-50. ^ p rovince f Pennsylvania and Counties of 
Xewcastlc, Kent and Sussex on Delaware, — To 
William Denny, Esquire, Greeting. Whereas 
the late King Charles the Second by his letters 
patent under the Great Seal of England bearing 
date the fourth day of March in the 23d year of 
his reign was graciously pleased to grant unto 
"William Penn, Esq. (the late father of the said 
Thomas Penn and Richard Penn, and since de- 
ceased,) his heirs and assigns the said Province of 
Pennsvlvania.with large powers, jurisdictions and 
authorities for the well governing, safety, defense 
and preservation of the said province and the 
people residing therein ; and more particularly to 
do and perform sundry matters and things therein 
mentioned either by himself or his deputies or 
lieutenants as by the said letters patent, relation 
being thereunto had, may more fully appear." 
" And whereas the late King Janus the Sec- 
• ond before he came to the Crown, by the name 
of James 'Duke of York and Albany, being 
rightfully ivossessed of a certain traet of land 
lying of the west side of the Pay and River Uiver 



The Pciuis o.ikl the Taxation of their Estates, . 175 

of Delaware now commonly called or known by 
the name or nanus of the Counties of Newcas- 
tle, Kent and Sussex upon Delaware and' being 
likewise invested with sundry royalties, privi- 
leges, immunities, powers, jurisdictions and au- 
thorities for the defense, safety, preservation and 
well-governing of the said tract of land and the 
inhabitants thereof, did by certain deeds duly 
executed and bearing date as therein mentioned, 
Give and Grant unto the said "William Penn, his 
heirs and assigns the said tract, of land Iving on 
the west side of the Bay and River of Delaware, 
with all and every the said royalties, privileges, 
immunities, powers, jurisdictions and authorities 
which he, the said Duke of York stood, then in- 
vested with as aforesaid; as by such deeds, rela- 
tion being thereunto had may now fully appear." 

" 2sow know you that "We reposing special 
trust and confidence in your loyalty to the King 
and in your prudence, conduct and integrity do 
by virtue of the said Letters Patent and deeds 
depute, constitute, nominate and appoint you the 
said William Denny, to be Lieutenant-Governor 
of the said province and counties." 

"Giving and hereby granting unto yon full 
power and authority to exercise, execute and put 
■in practice in ample manner all and every the 
powers, jurisdictions and authorities so granted 
unto the said William Penn, his heirs and 
assigns by the said Letters Patent and deeds as 
shall be necessary and convenient for the safety, 
well-being, defence, preservation and well govern- 
ing of the said province anil counties and the 
people thereof hereby committed and intrusted 
to your care and charge." 

" And*geiK i rally at all times and upon till occa- 
sions when proper and convenient to exercise, 



176 Tlte JAnos and the Taxation of their Estates. 

■ 
do, execute, act and perform all and all manner j 

of powers, authorities, acts military and all other 
matters and tilings whatsoever requisite and 
necessary for the good order of government, for 
the administering, maintaining and executing of ■ 
justice, and for the safety, peace, defense and 
preservation of the said province and counties 
and the people under your government and 
direction, as fully and amply to all intents, con- 
structions and purposes as We ourselves might 
or could do by virtue of the said Letters Patent 
and deeds or any otherwise howsoever were We 
personally present." 

"You following and observing such orders, 
instructions and directions as you now have or i 

hereafter from time to time shall receive from us 
or our heirs." S 

" To have, hold, execute, exercise and enjoy 
the said office or post of Lieutenant-Governor of 
the said province and counties with all and every 
the said powers, jurisdictions and authorities 
hereinbefore granted and all titles, privileges, pre- 
eminence, profits and advantages to a Lieutenant- 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the said 
province and counties belonging and therewith 
usually held and enjoyed, unto you the said "Wil- 
liam Denny, fur and during the good pleasure of 
us, or the survivor oC us and until further order." 

"Provided always that nothing herein con- 
tained shall extend or he construed, to extend to 
give 'you any power or authority to do, perform, 
act, suiter, acquiesce in or consent or agree unto 
any act, matter or thing whatsoever, by means 
or reason whereof we or either of us or the heirs 
of us or oi x either of us may he hurt, prejudiced, 
impeached or incumbered in our or their or 
either of our or their royalties, jurisdictions, 



The Perms and the Taxation of their Estate*. 177 

properties, estate, right, title or interest of, in or 
to the said province or counties ov any part of 
them; nor to set, lot, lease-out. grant, demise, 

receive, possess, occupy or dispose of any manors, 
messuages., lands, tenements, houses, gardens, 
royalties, rents, issues or profits arising, belong- 
ing or aeeruinfi: to us or either of us in the nrov- 
ince and counties aforesaid or otherwise; nor to 
intermeddle or concern yourself therewith or 
with any part of the property thereof or with 
any officer or officers appointed for the manage- 
ment thereof, either by placing, displacing, inter- 
rupting or hindering any of them in the just 
execution of their offices. But in case your aid 
or assistance shall he wanted by them and de- 
sired for our service, then and in such case you 
are hereby required to assist them by all lawful 
ways and means to the utmost of your power, 
anything hereinbefore contained to the to the 
contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding. 

"And we do hereby strictly command, charge 
and require all persons within the said province 
and counties, of what degree, quality, state or 
condition soever to yield, give and pay unto you 
all respect, submission and obedience as Lieu- 
tenant-Governor of the said province and coun- 
ties so appointed as aforesaid -as they will answer 
to the contrary at their peril. " 

" Given under our hands and seals-at-arms the 
seventeenth day of May in the twenty-ninth year 
of the reign of our sovereign Lord George the 
Becond, by the Graoe of God of Grout Britain, 
Fraiu-e and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, 
and so forth and in the year of can Lord 1750. 
(Signed) Thomas Pens, 

Riciiakd Pens." 

(To b» continued.) 

vol. xx [ v.— 12 



ITS 



An Old l\itns>/Icat"'a Roynl Coat-of-Anns. 



AN OLD PENNSYLVANIA LOYAL COAT-OF-ALMS. 

BY THOMAS ALLKN GLKNN. 




Recent investigation in Virginia proves that many of the 
first settlers of ' the Old Dominion caused their arras to be 
chiselled on their tombs or graven on their seals; but it 
remains for Pennsylvania to show the first use by an indi- 
vidual in private life in the American Plantations, so far as 
known, of coat armor marshalling the Loyal Arms of Eng- 
land, and thus asserting a royal lineasre nearly two gener- 
ations before the Revolution. 

That the user of these arras was a man of importance, if 
not of wealth, and that he was actually entitled to bear upon 
his escutcheon the lions of England, quartered with the 
lilies of France, and not a mere pretender, or a person 
ignorant of heraldry, cannot be questioned. 

The use of arras in early days in the colonies was not, 
indeed, uncommon, and in many eases persons were not too 
careful or scrupulous as to their right to the arras upon 
their seals, coaches, or plate: but to assume the Royal Arras 
at that time was a different and dangerous proceeding, and 



An Old PoutKtflcaro't Jloyal Coo i-of- Arms. 179 

few English engravers, we think, would have ventured to 
cut such a seal unless well assured of the identity of the 

applicant and the validity of his claim. 

The workmanship is- of about 1640, or earlier, and it was 
but little over a century and a half before that the head of 
one of Englands greatest nobles rolled upon the block for 
a similar vanity. 

The seal under consideration is in the possession of Hon. 
Samuel W, Pennypacker, President of the Historical Society 
of Pennsylvania, and a descendant of John Bevan, whose 
arms, or a coat identical with his, occupy the first quarter of 
the shield. 

It appears on two documents, Lease and Eel ease, dated 
28th and 29th of December, 1727, Indentures Tripartite, 
between William Branson, of Philadelphia, merchant, Cas- 
par AVister, of Philadelphia, brass-button maker, and Wil- 
liam Monington, of Philadelphia, merchant. The property 
conveyed was a furnace and one acre of land in Penkadocr 
Hundred, Xew Castle County, " upon Delaware," called 
Abbetinkton Furnace.- The previous title is recited, but is 
not interesting, except so far that a number of the company 
who originally operated the furnace, including Evan Owen, 
the Councillor, were AVelsh Friends. 

The deeds were drawn and executed in Philadelphia, and 
the conveyancer who drew them was, doubtless, the owner 
of the seal, or at least had it in his possession at that time. 
It is known positively that it did not belong to Branson, 
AYister, or Monington, or to the witnesses, who were Joseph 
England and William Tidmarsh. 

The seal is about one-half inch iir diameter (there are 
several impressions), and evidently made by a finger ring. 
The cutting has been well done, but the impressions are not 
so clear as they might he, and the lines indicating the tincture 
of the various charges are not clearly defined. The first or 
paternal coat on the shield is three chevronclls, whh a label 
for difference, ami the tinctures appear to be g&fcs and 
urgent. This was the paternal coat of John Bevan, of 



180 An Old Pennsyteama Jloyal Cwct-tf-Arm** 

Trcvcrig, C^Iamorganshire, a "Weld* Quaker, who came to 

Pennsylvania in 1684, anil who returned to Glamorgan- 
shire, flying upon his estate at Trcvcrig, but whose younger 
children remained in 'this country and left issue. 

As John Bevan was descended frpni the royal line of 
England, bcinfij seventh in descent from Eleanor, daughter 
of Henry Somerset, second Earl of Worcester (3fcrio», 
Glenn, 160), and as one or more of .13 e van's descendants 
are known to have been scriveners or conveyancers in Penn- 
sylvania, it seems reasonable to suggest- that the seal was 
his. A careful study of the various other arms upon the 
shield does not indicate, if this be correct, that the royal 
line above mentioned was the one intended to be exempli- 
fied when the coats were marshalled. 

The. pedigree, of John Bevan shows, however, so much 
in the wav of royal lineage that the theorv that these arms 
were his is considerably strengthened by an examination of 
the descent of the various families from which he came. 

The second coat upon the shield is per pale a salt ire en- 
graikd) countercharged, the bearings of the great house of de 
la Pole, and. the third, the Royal Arms of England, with 
a label for difference. 

Margaret Plantagenet, daughter of George, Duke of 
Clarence, married Sir Richard Pole, K. G., and had many 
children. A son, Sir Henry Pole, was beheaded in 1530: 
he married Jean, daughter of George Neville, Lord Aber- 
gavenny. The next coat may be that oi^ Neville, gules a 
saltire «/$«.»/, and the second Montacute, tnycnt three biZi 
in fe$s fftdes. The sixth and last coat is more doubtful. 

All of the families above named intermarried continually, 
and left many descendants, some in high walks ot % life who 
aspired to the throne, and others, in more humble stations, 
who went about their life work contentedly, with seemingly 
no ambition to pQSC as martyrs in a lost cause. 

From any of these, as well as from Henry of Somerset, 
through the houses of Miseiu, Neath, Tredomou, <»r Portlt- 
mal, John Bevan mav have come. 



Ail Old 2\iht}$ik'(&ua Royal Coat-of-Ann.>: 



181 






Certain it is that the iirst coat marshalled with the Royal 
Anns is apparently identical with his, and unk*ss it can he 
shown that some other person residing near Philadelphia 
in 1727 bore tor his paternal coat, gules, the three chrr- 
WOiiclls argent of Iestyn ap Gwrgaii, Prince of Glamorgan, 
or of the Earls of Clare {or three chevrons gales), it seems 
fairly certain that the seal was that of. Pevan. Xo such 
person is known to our genealogists. 

Be this as it may, that the Poyal Arms were used by a 
settler in Pennsylvania at that early day is the most inter- 
esting fact in the records of early American heraldry, and" 
it is hoped that the above notes may lead to a further in- 
vestigation of the subject. 



182 Names of Early Sellers of Darby Toirfishqf, Bet. 



\ 

I 

the names of the haply settlers of Idarby 

township, chester county, pennsylvania. 

i 

CONTRIBUTED BY MORGAN BUNTING. J 

[The recent recovery of the "Darby Township Book" has enabled 
Mr. Bunting to extract from it the names of the early settlers of the 
township. For the copy of the map of 1GS3, by Charles Ashcom, sur- 
veyor, we are indebted to Mrs. William B. Middleton. — Ed. Penna. 
Mag.] 



The Original! Record of the Township of. Darby in the 
County of Chester and province of Pensilvania as it was 
setteled by The English under William Peun Esquire Pro- 
prioter and Governor in Cheif of the said Province in the 
Year of our Lord one Thousand Six hundred and Eighty 
Two ; Giving an Account when Each Settelmcnt was bcirun, 
ilbr the better Regulating the Inhabitants in Serving the 
Respective offices of the said Township as Constables Super- 
visors overseers of the poor Veiwcrs of fences &e. 

Samuel Bradshaw and 

Thomas Worth came from Oxton in the County of Nottingham 
John Blunston and 

Michael Blunston from Littel Hallam in the County of Darby 
George Wood from ttonsall in ye County of Darby 
Joshua ftearne from Darley in ye County of Darby 
Henry Gibbins from Panvidge in ye County of Darby 
Samuel Sellers from Helper in ye County of Darby 
These came in the year 10$. 2. 

Richard Bonsai 1 from Mouldrige in ye County of Darby 
Edmund Cartlidge from Riding* in ye County of Darby 
Thomas Hood from Brason in the County of Darby 
John Hullowel from liucknall in ye County of Nottingham 
John Bartram from A>hburn in ye County of Darby 
William Wood from Nottingham. 



Names of Hady Settlers of Darhg To'C^^/c'p, Pa 

Thomas Bradshaw from Oxton in yc County of Nottingham 
Robert Naylor from Manniu-h in the County of Darby 
Richard Tucker from Warinister in ye County of Wills 
Th&e came in the year 1683. 



Robert Scorthorne from Oxton in ve County of Nottingham 
James Cooper from Bohon in the County of Lancaster in [ 

and from Mayfeikl in the County of Stafford in ye ye[ar ] 

John Hood from Casteldunington in ye County of Leicester] 
William Garratt from harby in the County of Lcieesper] 
Samuel Levis from har'n* in ye County of Leicester] 
John Smith from lmrby in The County of Leicestfer] 
William Smith from Cvoxton in }e County of Leiceste[r] 
Robert Clin'e from harby in the County of Leicester 
Thomas Smith from Croxton in The County of Leiceste[r] 
Richard Parker from upper broughton in ye County 'of Nottingham 
Adam Roades from Codnor in The County of Darby 
Thomas ffox from Sutton uppon Trent in ye County of Nottingham 
The-<e came m (he year lGSJ h 



Thomas Coates from Sprixton in the County of Leicester 
William Gabitiis from East Markham in ye County of Nottingham 
Joseph Need from Arnold in The County of Nottingham 
These came in the year 16S6 

Edward Peirson from Wimslow in ye County of Chester 
John Kirke from AUfreetown in The County of Darby ' 
John Marshall from Elton in The County of Darby 
These settled in the year 1GS7. 

Thomas Collier from Nottingham 
John Rail from Darley in the County Darby 
John Wood from Nottingham 

Nicholas Ireland from Laxton in the County of Nottingham 
Thae settled in the yeur J6S9. 



Note that Cat con hook was added to Darby in ye year lo?G 
Containing Six Settlement viz. 
Morton Mortonson Peter Peterson 

} lance Urine Swan Boone. 

Dance Boone Mat bias N«t>ilas 



184 ■ Names nf Jvirl'i Settlers of ])arl>ii T&easkip, Pa. 

Anthony Morgan from Cardife in Clamorgan>hire 
John Hood, Jun r from Casteldunington in ye County of Leicester 
Robert Smith from Sawley in the County of Darby 
. Lewis David ) 
Ralph Lewis J 

These settled in the year 1691. 

John Bethel 1 Set teled in the year 1694 

James Cooper dueled in the year , 1695 

William Bartram Setteled in the year 1696 

Samuel Garret Setteled in the year lGf 1 G 

Josiah Hibbard Setteled in the year . 1697 

John Dawson Setteled in The year 1697 

Christopher Spray Setteled in the year 169S 

Obadiah Bonsall Setteled in the year 1698 

Josiah ffearne Setteled in The year 1700 • 

Peter Petersons new Settelment in the year 1G9S 

Anthony Morgans new Settelment in the year 1700 

Samuel Hood Setteled in the year 1700 

John Bethel! Jun r Setteled in the year 1704 

John Bown Setteled in the year 1703 

Job Harvey Setteled in the year 1707 
John Blunston, Jun r Setteled in the year . 1707 

Lawrance Morton Setteled in the year 170S 

John Broom Setteled in the year 170S 

John Test Setteled in the year 1711 

Thomas Pasehall Setteled' in the year 1711 

Joshua Calvert Setteled in the year 1712 

Samuel Bradshaw Setteled in the year ' 1712 

Mathias Morton Setteled in the year 1712 

David Thomas Setteled in the year 1714 

James Whitacer Setteled in the year 1715 

George Wood Setteled in the year 1715 

Job' Harvey's new Settelment in the year 1715 

Joshua Johnson Setteled in the year 1715 

John Marshall Setteled in the year 1716 

Thomas Broom Setteled in The war 1716 

William Preist Setteled in the year 1/ 16 

William Wood Setteled in the year 1719 

Joseph llibhard Setteled in the year 1725 

Charles Justis Setteled in the year 1725 

Samuel Bunting Setteled in the year 1725 

Thomas (Medwier)? Setteled in the year 1725 

Awbray Wood Setteled in the year 17:V> 



Names of Early Settlers of Darby Town-fop, Pa. 1S5 



V: 





1727 




17:28 




1727 




1729 




17*9 




1729 




1780 




1730 




1730 




1731 


ir 


1732 




1733 




1733 




1733 




1734 




1734 




1734 




1735 




1735 




1736 




1737 




173S 




173$ 




1734 




1739 




1739 




1739 




1739 




1740 




1740 




1741 




1749 




1742 




1743 




1744 




1744 


ir 


1744 




1745 




1745 


ye; 


r 1745 




17-10 




17--.0 




1751 



Benjamin Lob!) Seated in the year 172 

Enoch Kliot Bettled in the year t 1727 

Isaac Lea Settled in the year 

John Marshall Jurr" Settled in the year 

John Wallis Settled in the yea? 

Everard Ellis Settled in the year 

Benjamin Peirson Jun r Settled in ye year 

Th : Tatnalls new Settelment in ye year 

John Marshal Is* new Settelment in ye year 

Andrew Boons new Settehnent in ye year 

Benjamin Bonsall's new Settelment in ye year 

Josiah fleam's Settelment made in Lower Darby in The year 

Thomas Peirson Settled in the year 

David Mortons new Settelment made in ye year 

Joseph Bonsai Is Settelment made in ye year 

Benjamin Lobbs Settelment in Lower Darby in ye year 

William Kirks Settelment made in ye year 

firancis Pull in Setteled in the year 

Tames Hunts Settelment made in Lower Darby In the year 

John Ball Settled in the year 

Benjamin Bonsall's settilment in Lower Darby 

John Hoades settelment in the year 

Isaac Leas settlement in the year 

Samuel! Garratts new Settlement in y e year 

Joseph Bonsalls new Settlement in water street in ye year 

John Pasehalls new settlement in front street in ye year 

Elizabeth Hibberds Settlement in front street in ye year 

Evered Ellis's new Settlement in upper Darby in ye year 

Swan Boons Settlement in upper Darby in y* year 

Soloman Humphry settled in Lower Darby in ye year 

Edward Waldron settled in Lower Darby in ye year 

Isaac Pearson settled in Lower Darby in the year 

Edward Waldron settled in Lower Darby in ye year 

Jacob Webber settled in Lower Darby in ye year 

Stephen Paschall settlement in Upper Darby in ye year 

Matthew Ash settled in Upper Darby in ye year 

Enoch Bonsall's new settlement in Lower Darby 

Thomas TatnePs new settlement in Upper Darby in ye year 

Ambrose Wilkeoclcs settled in Lower Darby in year 

John Davis's new Settlement in Upper Darby in ye year 

Cun rod Nethertnark's m w settlement in Ca Icon hook in ye yea 

Andrew Urin new Settlement in Cu Icon hook in the year 

Abraham Lewis Jun'r settled in Upper Darby in ye year 

Samuel Kirk Settled in Upper Darby in ye year 



w 



186 Names of Early Settlors of Darby Township, Pa. 

William Garret settled in Upper Darby in ye year 173] 

Abraham Johnson Settled in Upper Darby -in ye year 1751 

Swan Boons new Settlement in Lower D.-.-rby 1752 

Tobias Mortens new Settlement in Lower Darby 1702 

Enoch Bonsalla new Settlement in Lower Darby 1755 

William Parker new Settlement, in Louver Darby 1760 

Abraham Bonsalla new Settlement in Upper Darby 1760 

Abraham Johnson's new settlement in Upper Darby 17G0 

Benjamin Lobbs new Settlement in Upper Darby 17G0 

John Kirk's new settlement in upper Darby 1760 



Foreigners who arrived at Philadelphia, 1701-1702. 1ST 



LISTS OF FOPE1GNEPS WHO APJUVED AT PIIILA- 
■ DELPIL1A, 1701-1792. 

CONTRIBUTED BY LUTHER R. KELKEK, ESQ. 

[The following certified lists of foreigners who arrived at Philadelphia, 
1791-1792, are additional to tlio.se printed in Pennsylvania Archives, 
Second Series, Vol. XVII.] 

List of Passengers on Board the 'Ship "Philadelphia 
Packet," Edward ■ Pice, Master, from Amsterdam. 
Phila. Jany. 18, 1791. 

Marie Jacobs. Barnhard Driesbnefa k wife. 

Henry Richards. John Gottfriedon Markt. 

Sussaneh Ivoam. Abral Gcerman. 

J. G. Meyers, his wife & two John Valentine, 

children. Jacob "Whit comb. 

I do hereby certify that the above is a true list of Pas- 
sengers on board of the above ship under my command. 

Edward Pice. 

His Excellency Thomas Mifflin Esq. 

Governor of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 
Sir • 

I take the liberty to transmit to your Excellency the Lists 
of Names of German Passengers who arrived at this Port 
from Juno 30 th 1701 to June' '2 9 th 1792, and were permitted 
to Land agreeably to Law. 

I am with the greatest respect, your Excellency's most 
obedient and very humble Servant 
Philadelphia July 9, 1702 Lewis Farmer, 

Ih'Qttitcr of G\rrii"H % 



186 Fnrngnm who arrlccd at PhiimMj^ua, 1701-170:. 

List of Passengers, who arrived ix the Brioaxtise 
"Mary" from Amsterdam at the . Port of Pjiiladela. 
Jim: 30 tb 1791. 

Stephanns Clauss. George Ernst Fries. 

Johannes Balde. Kesrina Dorethea Heiiingiir. 

Jolian Henry Balde* William Balde. 

I do hereby certify the above beim? a True List of the 
Passengers on sailing Vessel above mentioned. 

K. FlTZ PATRICK. 



A List of German Passexgers ox board the Ship 

"DlAXA," OZIAS GOODMAN, COMMAXDER. 



Ueinrick Jullig. 

Dorothea, his wife. ' 

George Pete^,*j „ 

Henrick, > 

!-,,-, children. 

Parble, J 



Peter Grail. 
Barbara, his wife. 

Catharina, 

Georir. ! 4 



Peter, 
Barbara, 



children 



Daniel Guiitar. 

Anna Margaret, his wife. 

Daniel, 

Hans Daniel, 

Catharine, 

Caroline, 

Hans Jacob, 

Dans William, 

Conrad, 



hildr 



Conrad Sehmeltzer. 
Margaret, his wife. 



Francis Pame. 
Catharine, his wife 
Frederick, 
John Daniel 



\ 2 

, J children. 



Daniel Stier. 
Catharine, his will 



Catharine Marg\ Rippart. 

George, 

Christian, 

Catharine. 

Elizabeth, cliildren. 

Margaret, 

Sophia, 



Casper Ilctii. 

Margaret, his wife. 

Peter, 

Hans, 

Lewis, 



. 3 

children 



Rnkjner* who crrUat at Pbllaikhhm t 170 J -1792. ISO 



Jacob Swell. 
Sophia, his wife. 
Joh. Henry, "] 
Catharine, 4 

llano Mary, children. 

Jacob, J 



Peter Blanch. 
Dorothy, his wife. 
Sophia, ^ 3 



Mar^arel 



Magdalene, 



' 1 children. 



George More. 
Catharine, his wife. 
George, ^ 3 

George Henry, > children. 



Peter, 



Daniel "Wcisborin. 
Barbara, his wife. 
Laurens, their child. 



Mngdalena Eidelmeihin. 

Magdalena, her child. 



Christina Weisbornin. 
Margaret, her child. 



Michel Bauer. 
Catharine, his wife 
Philip Jerry, 
Philip Jacob, 
Hans Michael, 
Catharine Dehora, 
ILuw Peter, 



Peter ] )ureiibn rgl 1 

Eliza, his wife. 
Solirna, -\ 

Philip, 4 

Jerry Frederick, 1 children. 
Hans Jerry, J 



Salima van der Gros. 
Urelina, her child- 



Margaret Rippart. 

Lewis, ^ 
Martin, 
George, 
Jacob, 



children. 



Christian Wbltz. 
Catharine, his wife 
Christian, 

Catharine, 

Begina, children. 

Maretia, J 



George Sifz. 

Anna Elizabeth, his wife. 

Hans Jerry. 

Catharine Eliza. 

Hand Jacob. 

Maria Magrdalcnc. 



> -* 



George iFcnry Mortcl 

Catharine, his wife. 



Martin Papp, 

John George, his son. 



WO Furdgnera icfio arrived at Philadelphia, 1701-1792, 

. i 

Peter Durenbaugh. Joh Justus Kersten, 

Margaret, his wife. Chad Fred. Jluguenin. 

Hans Jerry, y , ., . Geor^'L. ranuir. 

ii > children. T ., °;_, . . 

Magdalene, j Joiian Matthias Simon. 

Joh llochn. 

Joh Gettinger. Frantz Arforg. 

JoLan Titius. Carl IIend k . Schmadhtaha. 

Frcd k . Granram. ^o\i Leonard Blocscr. 

Carl Granram. j& Schneider. 

Valentine "VTcindling. Ph ) Ander-man. 

George Klein. Georg Fred. Krauss. 

George Wolf. Dan ^ rC(] Lev> 

Joli. Christ*. "Weinmuller. ]^ oisa Linnerhi. 

Christian Fritz. g usan ^Jeitlen. 

Nichol Hang. 

Johanna Jost. 

Nichol Hauler. Frcfl Breeheisen. 

Nicholas Bcfcvwer. Catharine, Ins wife. 

Theobald Schmidt. . Fredench, -> 

Jacob Kiiith. Catharine Eliza, V 3ehildren. 

Coniath Schuliz. Johan George, J 

Jolmn Lewis Urban. 



Catbarina Wagnarin. Barbara Weindling. 

I do certify the within being a True List of the Las- 
sengers on board my ship. Witness my hand this tenth day 



of August 1791 



Ozias Goodwin. 



List or Passengers on board the Ship " Philadelphia 
Packet" from Amsterdam. 1 

Ph. Jae. Bretry. George Ilartzog. 

Jacob G. Pofie. Frederick Ilartzog. 

Jacob Stohr. Coen Jnlter. 

J. Fred. 1). Fanholtz. J. J. Hausc. 

Ant. Ilartmann. Francis llause, wife. 

J. G. Ilartzog'. Jacob llause* 
Salaniiirina Ilartzog — wife, Francisco llause. 



Foreigners irho arrived at Philadelphia. 1701-1702. 191 



Barbara I la use. 
J. I. Hadeiinaker, 
J. S. Eder. 



G. C. Lux. 
Elizabeth Herman. 
jJ.P.Echhafd ^Cahin Passenger. 

I do hereby certify the within Being a True List of the 
Passengers on board my ship. Witness my hand this 
twenty-third day of August 1791. Edward Rice. 

Passengers ox poard the Ship "Fair A^ericax," Cart. 
Bexjamix Lee, from Amsterdam, arrived ix Philadel- 
phia, 12'Septemrer 1791. ' 



Georg Ludwig Ansehutz. 
Catharine Elizabeth An- 

schutz. 
Johan Geonre Ansehutz. 
Christian Ansehutz. 
Elizabetha Ansehutz. 
Dorothea Ansehutz. 
Johan Jacob Ansehutz. 
Heinrieh Jully. 
Catharina Barbcra Jolly. 
Maria Magdalena Jully. 
Heinrieh Jully. 
Adam Jully. 
J oh aim Jacob Giinther. 
Maria Barbara Giinther. 
Jacob Giinther. 
Johanna Giinther. 
Frantz Bremer. 
Friederich YTcirzsackcr. 
Johan Martin Klein. 
Maria Magdalena Schniuckcn 
Margarethe Schmucken. 
Peter Koch. 

Johan "Wilhclm Versbach. 
Wilhelin Versbach. 
Conradt Lvsinirer. 



Jacob Hermann Jlein. 
Anne Catharine Ilein. 
Margaretta Phillippina Ilein. 
Bernhart Ilein. 
Catharine PhillipinGuntzing. 
Job ana Elcnberger. 
Maria Elcnberger. 
Elizabeth Elcnberger. 
Magdalen Elenberjrer. 
Friederich Iliun. 
Friederich Jonas. 
Anna Maria Jonas. 
Johan \\ ilhelnj Jonas. 
Phillippina Jonas. 
Jacob Jonas. 
Ann Catharina Jonas. 
Juliana Jonas, 
llerononius Ecker. 
Henrich Golzen. 
Phillipp Li.uler. 
Phillipp posier. 
Johan Jacob llartmann. 
Christian Kutscher. 
Jacob Mcsmer. 
Johanna Giiider. 
Elizabeth Cinder. 



VJ2 Foreigners who arrived at FhiMefchia, 1791-1702. 

Frederick Ginder. Johan Peter IXring. 

A tine Marie Cinder. Adam ll'enrich. 

Johanna Louisa Ginder. Jacob friederiek Roller. . 

Johanna Ginder. Johan Bernhardt Sehiiler. 

Casper Fallen. Johan Gotfried Dieterich. 

Peter Fallen. Scintje Obisan. 

Anna Catliarina Fallen. Caroline Christiana Gainer. 

Mietzie Josephs. Phillip Schimper. 

Gustav Frederic Goetz. Bernhart Sehulles. 
Johan Christov Geil. 

Cabin Passengers. 

Christopf Ludwig Albert/.. Johann Jacob feronner. 
Maria Catherina Albert/. Christian Godfried Elsacber. 

Maria Dorothea Brenner. 

I do hereby certify, the above being a True List of all 
the Passengers on board the Ship within mentioned. 

Witness my hand this thirteenth day of September 1791. 

B. Lee. 

Job. G. Nertwig and Eliza- Cor. Gott Saur. 

belli Xetwig. Job. lien llugel. 

John George Diekhout. G.AV* llnirel. 

Anna Clara Diekhout. Mart Browner. 

Peter Bare with wife and two John Morgenthal. 

children, Peter Catharine John Cappers. 

& Catliarina. • John Cline. 
Casper 11 ill. George Xottiim-. 
John Steim Strauel. Catharine Meyer. 
Jacob Ecbternoel. Mar Strooms. 
Charles P>osbishel. Paul Smith. 
Nicholas Hoffman. Philip Schmidt. 
Andrew Schneider. Pied. Petts. 
Cornelius Barthemel. Andreas Egternoel. 
Abraham IveMcfr*. ' Nic Leiglc. 
Diebman. Christian Cable & wife, Chris- 
John Midler. tian k Mary, 



Foreigners icho arrtred at PhitmldphM, 1791-1702. 103 

Frederick Snyder. John Mason, with wifo & two 

John Valentine Heir. children, " ^fnry, Joseph 

Elizabeth Schmitt. George Mcchil. 

John Ostreith. Andrew Screros. 

John Peter Kern. , Charles Egternoel. 

Ant Bousorum. John Poon. 

Philip Stuhenitzhe. Lamher Poherson. 

John Peter Blende. Barhont Butlinger, wife & 

Gen 1 Schlieht. daughter Margarethe. 

I do hereby certify this to be a True List of the Passen- 
gers on Board the Ship Pallas, under my command, Sep- 
tember 27, 1791. 

Charles Collins. 



A List or Passengers Brought over in the Ship "Van- 
stophorst" from Amsterdam, James Porter, Master. 

John \\ r . Starag P (?) Charles Carboum. 

John Conrad Brum Maria Elizabeth Carboum. 

Friederieh Duisbe. Maria Susanna Carboum. 

John H. Rosenbung. ' Maria Margaret he Carboum. 

Daniel Carboum. Simon Hippie. 

Elizabeth Carboum. Addam " 

Daniel Carboum. 

These are to certify, the above being a True List of the 
Passengers on Board my Ship. Philadeh October 22. 1791. 

James Porter. 



List or German Passengers, who arrived in the Ship 
"Philadelphia Packet" Cam. Edward Pice, from 
Amsterdam, Philadelphia April 26, 1702. 

Henry franfz llenstead. Tuniss Tuneee. 

Jaeobina Col pin. 

VOL. XXIV. — 13 



19-1 Fom'r/tx'fs nho orrirol at FhUaddphh, 1701-179?. 

A LlST OF pAg£ESG£R3 BY THE S.JIIP " I>ETSEY Ri'TLE&GE" 

from Hamburg, Daxl. McPhersox, Master. 

Freidcrieli Wilhelm Kung- Johnnn Christopher Lange. 

oldti Carol Sclm maker. 

Freiderich Ludwig Albert. . Johann Dedrieh Smith. 

Joliunn Christian Lartcl. George Kex his wife Maria 
Johaim Christian Loehr. & one child. 

I do hereby Certify that the above are the names of all 

the Passengers on Board the Vessel above named. Philad* 

May 25 th 1792. v . 

Danl. McPhersox. 

List or Passengers ox board the Ship " America," William 

Campbell Master last from Amsterdam* 
Mrs. Tot van Tla-e & 3 child- J. E. 1). llimroth. 



ren. 
Christ" Strohm & wife. 
.John Strohm. 
Barbara Strohm. 
Elizabeth Strohm. 
George Hon & wife & 4 
• children. 

Philad* 29 th June 1792. 



Jleronemns Lesh. 
J. V. I). Muhren. 
Anthony Kegel. 
Casper Zollinger & wife & 2 
children. 

Benjamin. 

"Willi a m Campbell. 



List op Passengers & Servants by the Brig " LTxiox" from 
Hamburg arrived the 28 th day of June 1702. 



Johan Valentine Sehel- 1 

lard. 
Martha Eliz h Sehellard. 
Johan Jurgen Schel- 

lard. 
Peter Andre Laniran- 

o 

hargen. 
Carl llarbermeier. 
Christian Adder. 
Caterina Elifc h Casterins. 



Children. 



Johan Francis 
~ i Christian 5 

£, years old. 

S Johan llendriek 
Ifj Daniel 3 years 

i old. 

X 

£ Johan Wilholm Storck. 
Christo Cloudy. 
Christian Hcmtaric-k Lando- 
trick. 

J amps Pry burgh. 
(To bo continued.) 



The Tiro Jlktl Autobiographies of Jfaanfflu. . 195 



THE TWO RIVAL AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF 
FttANKLIN. 

BY RICHARD MEADE BACIIE. 

The question is, Whether or not William Temple Frank- 
lin, 'grandson and secretary of J)r. Franklin, and inheritor 
of his papers, was justified in printing the Autobiography of 
his grandfather from the manuscript which lie emploved for 
that purpose in lieu of the other at his disposal, which some 
persons have deemed the one that he should have adopted. 
It has even been charged that lie suppressed in the original 
manuscript that last portion of the Autobiography which 
appears in one of the published versions of these two manu- 
scripts and not in the other. 

Nevertheless, although this looks suspicious, in connec- 
tion with the fact that the manuscript which William Tem- 
ple Franklin discarded really contained supplementary 
matter which the other did not possess, a full understanding 
of the case must exonerate him from blame, except as to 
carelessness, and conclusively prove that he was merely un- 
qualified for the task committed- to him. He printed the 
Autobiography from a manuscript which any one, without 
due care, would have regarded as even more authentic than 
the autograph of it in his possession. The mistake he made 
was in not collating them, to ascertain which should take 
precedence of the other as the work, p"r e.r lt h\,u-c, of Frank- 
lin. Without this examination, however, he exchanged the 
autograph ot' the Autobiography for what was ostensibly a 
perfect copy of it held by Madame le Viellard as the heir to 
it from her husband, the former Mayor of Passyj and an in- 
timate friend oi' Franklin's, having been in 1794 guillotined 
during the French Revolution. Doubtless, William Temple 
Franklin, having hundreds of pages of his grandfather's 
handwriting in his pt -session, did not regard this particular 



• 



19G The 7\ro Jlical Autobiographies of Franklin. 

■ 

autograph as peculiarly sacred, and besides, in giving it to 

Madame le Yiellard he was bestowing it upon the widow of 
one of Franklin's dearest friends. 

The Hon. John Bigelow was in 1867 presented with the 
autograph of the Autobiography by Monsieur I*, de Senar- 

rnont, a collateral member of the family of Monsieur le 
Yiellard, to whom it had descended by inheritance. It then 
seemed obvious to many persons that William Temple 
Franklin had not compared with the original the copy 
which he had acquired through Madame le Yiellard, and 
had not otherwise come to know that this copy lacked some 
concluding matter written in the last year of Franklin's 
life, and that it sometimes differed in phraseology. It 
seemed to them that he had used the copy instead of the 
autograph he had held, on account of its being, as he stated 
at the time, better adapted, from .the fact of its legibility, to 
the printer's use. The concluding matter which was there- 
by lost to William Temple Franklin's printed version of the 
Autobiography is of such a character, however, that there . 
could have been no motive for its suppression, and as for . 
verbal alterations, it will be shown that they were in all 
probability made bv Franklin himself. I 

Mr. Bigelow, however, took a very different view of these 
matters. Having discovered that the text of William 
Temple Franklin's printed Autobiography of the doctor 
does not always agree with that of the doctor's autograph 
of the work, with respeet to many verbal particular? and 
with respect to the omission of a part at the end, he re- 
garded it as thereby conclusively proved- that William 
Temple Franklin was scuiltilv responsible for those difler- 
ences. I submit, however, that the evidence extant does 
not justify this as the natural conclusion. 

Divesting the question of all feeling regarding the wretched 
manner in which William Temple Franklin performed his 
general editorial duties in printing the papers of his grand- 
father, and euniining ourselves strictly to tiro facts of the 
case, we are brought to the simple consideration vi whether 



The Two Jiitai A>>fr>h>r>(jraphies of FrankltA. 197 

or not William Temple Franklin designedly omitted a por- 
tion of his grandfather's work and otherwise changed it by 
vernal alterations. 

The cop}* of the Autobiography from whieh William 
Temple Franklin printed is probably not in existence. En- 
quiry for it at the State Department in Washington has 
been fruitlessly made. It probably went into the. waste- 
paper basket after having served the purpose of the printer. 
If it had been in existence, it might possibly have been 
(but it was not) among the papers lost in London and ac- 
quired by Mr. Henry Stevens, the papers which are now in 
the State Department in Washington. Were we in posses- 
sion of that papery the question under consideration would be 
settled at once by examining it. If changes had been made 
in that draft, they would be in the handwriting of Franklin 
himself, in that of William Temple Franklin, or in that of 
Benjamin Franklin Bache. It is not in the least likely that- 
petty changes were made in the paper by Franklin,. for it was 
prepared as a present to Monsieur le Yicllard. There are 
two other ways, however, in which the text that purported to 
be derived from it might have been changed. One is by 
alterations in the matter made by William Temple Franklin 
before the paper was given to the printer, or his alterations 
in the "proof" from it. It is highly improbable, however, 
that William Temple Franklin, after having secured, as such, 
a fair copy of the Autobiography, would then have pro- 
ceeded to cut it up with corrections. lie was not fond o\^ 
work, and he was no stickler for accuracy. 

There remains the last person to whom it was possible to 
alter the text, the copyist, Benjamin Franklin Bache, the 
eldest of the legitimate grandsons of Dr. Franklin. But 
such a supposition is incredible* Between 1788 and 1700, 
the interval when the Autobiography was revised, Benjamin 
Franklin Bache was a youth of twenty years of age, and his 
grandfather used him simply as an amanuensis in making a 
fair copy of the Autobiography gent to Monsieur le Yicllard. 
lie wrote a beautifullv clear hand, and was otherwise admi- 



198 The Ttco Jtival Autobl<yjva^hks of Franklin. 

i 

rahly lit ted to perform this duty for hi* flying g:ra**d father, 

who, as lie hU*#elf says .in a letter to Monsieur le Viellard, 

got one of his grandsons (presumably this one, as the eldest) 
to make the copy of the Autubio«ivai»hv under his direction. 1 
It is not credible that this youth, devoted to his grandfather, 
living in an age when young men did not presume to know- 
more than their fathers and grandfathers, would have 
changed the t^yA of the Autobiography as prescribed by 
bis bedridden relative. 

I conclude from all the evidence that what "William Temple 
Franklin received from Madame le Viellard as the fair copy 
of the .Autobiography was such in the estimation of Frank- 
lin himself; that it lacked the concluding part only perforce |. 
of the fact that it was sent to Monsieur le Viellard as a pres- 
ent before the original manuscript received a perhaps un- 
contemplated addition; and that it remained a fair copy 
from beginning: to end, until it found repose in the waste- 
paper basket. The evidence, I think, clearly points, not to 
Mr. IJigelow's conclusion, but to that of Mr. Henry Stevens, 
the former possessor of the lost Franklin papers, where he 

says in an essay descriptive of them, — 

i 

"It [the autograph of the Autobiography] is an important relic of 
the great American statesman and philosopher, hut it would manifestly 
have been -wrong, under all the circumstances, for Temple Franklin to 
print the original draft (though somewhat corrected) instead of the copy 
revised and corrected by the author. Franklin himself may have erred 
in judgment sometimes and chosen a secondary word ; but, in almost 
every instance, the last construction of the sentence and the word sub- 
stituted rest on good foundations. Temple Franklin, therefore, may be 
discharged as not guilty." 

On his dying bed, often racked with pain, the old phi- 
losopher struggled against the advance iA' death to keep np 
communication with his friends and to complete his task in 

1 William Temple Franklin, the doctor's, former amanuensis, was 
then living on a farm in New Jersey which his father, the ex-Governor, 
had given him. 



The Tiro Jllml A*itobio<jr«plkk$ of Franldia. 109 

the revision of the Autobiography, doubtful himself, as he 
wrote, if his condition permitted him to exercise in the 
latter undertaking the best discrimination. Under these 
circumstances it would not be at all surprising that he 

should not always have made judicious changes in his 
work, but Mr. Stevens says truly, so far as I also am enabled 
to judge from examples of changes given hy Mr. Bigclow, 
that "in almost every instance the last construction of the 
sentence and the word substituted rest on-good foundations." 
Some, in fact, can he pointed out where the condensation- 
and the relative propriety of the amended phrase are indis- 
putable. 

It follows, from what has been said, that short as the 
Autobiography of Franklin is, there is no uneqni vocal ly-to- 
be-accepted version of.it. It should he obvious, too, that 
the best, as the most authentic, version of the work would 
be represented hy the printed text of it in William Temple 
Franklin's edition of his grandfather's works, ivith the addi- 
tion of its lacking matter as published for the first time hy 
Mr. Bigelow as its last chapter. The first of these elements 
represents almost the whole of the work as revised and cor- 
rected by Franklin himself; the second, only a brief addi- 
tion, apparently left by him without a copy. 



!00 An Itinerary to Nwgafa Foils m 1S00. 



AN ITINERARY TO NIAGARA FALLS IX 1S09. 



"Trenton to dinner at tlic City Hotel, good; thence to 



"\Voo<Jbriclgo to lodge, — a miserable hovel and plenty of 
buirs. Newark to breakfast, New York to dinner, seventy 
miles to Hudson; breakfast at Niehol's, miserable; 130 
miles to Lebanon Springs, to supper; here you visit the set- 
tlement of the Shakers; to Albany, at Gregory's (Tontine) 
very good, 30 m., Balstown Springs (you stop at Schenec- 
tady half-way to breakfast at the Tontine — tolerable) at the 
Springs up at Aldridge's, very good, Schenectady to Break- 
fast, Amsterdam at Prides to dinner, this house belonged to 
Sir William Johnson befure the Revolution, to Palestine, to 
lodge, at Shepherd's, here you must take care or they'll 
lodge a dozen of you in one room, thence to Little Falls 
to breakfast, at Carr's, very excellent. Here is a canal with 
six locks and an iron bridge across the Mohawk River. Utica 
to dinner and lodge. Pour miles after vou leave the Little 

o » 

Falls you come into the German Plats, a very fertile coun- 
try and if you have occasion to stop at Herkimer, you will 
find a good house. At LTtica quarter at the Hotel, a large 
Brick house very good fare, this place is half-way from 
Albany to Geneva, Taylor's to breakfkst, — bad enough. 
This is at the commencement of the Oneida Indian Reserva- 
tion, which extends G miles along the road and contains 
about 80,000 acres ; the tribe consists erf about 1000 persons ; 
you pass through their town. There is a good tavern about 
11 miles from t r tu-a, where you had better breakfast; 
stop at Warner's PS miles from Taylor's as good a house 
as you'll meet with on the road. Stop at the 87-mile stone 
to see the deep spring about 50 yards from the road; at the 
45-mile stone is a newly discovered cave close to the road- 
side. Fobes's to lodge 10 miles from Warner's; table tol- 
erable but you must look sharp for good lodging. Ten 



An Itinerary io Ktngmra Frfh In lSOr<. 201 

miles to Skcncatles Lake; breakfast at .Andrews, good. 
Cayuga Lake to dinner at Harris's, v. poor looking house 
but pretty good table; 10 miles to Geneva, to lodge at 
Powell, the best you can get in the place. Thence to the 

Sulphur Springs, to breakfast, good accommodations, from 
the .Springs you go to Canandaiqua, here you bait and pro- 
ceed to Gen. Hall's to dinner & lodge — tolerable accom- 
modations 12 m. Genesee River to breakfast at Lovejoy's — 
good; the landlord will give you plenty of tongue for 
breakfast! Immediately after passing the river you enter 
the Genesee plains, where there is a settlement of the 
Seneca Indians; they own 2 miles along the road & one ill 
Width. Stoddards to dinner, but the next place you stop 
at is Marvins 4 miles from Stoddards, — the road very bad. 
This is at the commencement of the Holland Company's 
purchase. From Marvin's to Batavia where you lodge at 
Keyls's, table middling but the beds miserable. Here you 
come on the bad roads, but by all means take the Old road 
altho it's 6 miles further, which if you do you must take 
one meal with you, as you see no house for 18 miles. 
You leave Batavia in the mornimr & come to Yen- 
deventer's 24 miles to lodge; here you meet with petrifac- 
tions & old Indian fortifications. Hansom's, 14 miles to 
breakfast, tolerable fare—from here; you pass on to Black 
Rock on the American side of the river where you will 
find a pretty good table; here you cross the Xingara River 
into Canada & travel 1G miles to Chippawaw — here you put 
up at Fanning'* a pretty good house. Here, if you intend 
going under the falls you must prepare yourselves with a 
change of cloaths, as you will get a complete drenching — for 
the purpose of changing, there is a house at the Falls, 
where you are permitted the use oi' a room, & it' you choose 
can have a cold snack. One thing yon must not forget at 
Chipp.iway ,v .that is to see the inflammable air spring, in 
the river, the landlord will furnish you with a boat, fire 
tve, & you may set the- river on tire. 

After .you have viewed the falls you proceed to Newark 



202 An Itinerary to Niagara Falls in 1800. 

or Niagara on Lake Ontario, on the way you stop nt an 
excellent bouse kept by Rorback, to dine. Pass through 

Queenstown where you see the King's stores ami arrive at 
Xewark" in the evening — stop at the Niagara Ooftee bouse 
kept by S. Powis where you will find excellent accommoda- 
tions. Opposite the town on the American side is Fort 
Niagara where you will find Dr. AVestof, a Philadelphia!), 
who will treat you with a great deal of politeness. 



Some of the Descendants of Ecan Robert Lciris. 203 



SOME OF THE DESCENDANTS OF EVAX EOEEET 
LEWIS, OF FEOX G'OCH, WALES. 

[The following is a copy of a manuscript genealogy of the descendants 
of Evan Robert Lewis (i.e., Evan son of Robert son of Lewis), of Fron 
Guch, a large farm near Bala, Merionethshire. It exemplifies very well 
the "Welsh system of surnames, by "which the son took his father's Chris- 
tian name as his surname, so that a number of persons hearing different 
surnames were frequently descended from a common ancestor in the male 
line. Thus the descendants in the male line from Evan Robert Lewis, 
no later than 1750, were known by the surnames of Owen, Evan, Jones, 
Williams, and Griffiths ; but such surnames indicated no relationship to 
families of the same name. The genealogy here printed was presented 
to the Historical Society of Pennsylvania bv Mr. Gconre Vaux in' 1S01, 
having been found among the papers of Eleanor Long in 1857. It is 
a copy of one of those compiled about the year 1707 by Cadwalader 
Evans from data furnished him by older members of the family and 
from family papers, some of which were brought from Wales in 1G9S. 
There are several copies of this genealogy extant, which vary more or 
less in information. The one here printed is the most accurate that 
the writer has seen, except that in possession of Rowland Evans, Esq.. 
which has been added to from time to time, and also has appended the 
pedigree of Evan Robert Eewis from papers brought from Wales, and 
which was amplified by the late Rowland E. Evans. The pedigree runs 
thus: Evan (i.e., Evan Robert Eewis) ap Robert ap Eewis ap Griffith 
ap Howell ap Enion ap Deikws Ddn ap Madog ap Evan Goch ap David 
Guch ap Trahairn Goch O'Lyn. Additional information regarding the 
families descended from Evan Robert Eewis may be found in Jenkins's 
Gicyncdd and Glenn's Merlon. The genealogy lure presented also gives 
the Pennsylvania descendants (in the female line) of Ellis Williams, of 
Cai Fadog.] 

Ellis Williams of Cai fadog had four Daughters, viz: 

a c i o 

Margaret, Douse, Gwonn & Ellin. 

The said Ellin married John Morris ot % Brin Gvrin in 
Denbighshire, bv her had one daughter named Ellin who 
married Cadwalader ab Evan late of Owvnedd deceased. 



204 Sonic of the Descendant's of Ecan liohert LeieU, 

i 

Gweun, another daughter of the said Ellis Williams laud 
three children who came to Pennsylvania viz: 
' 1. Ellis Pug!) litte of Gwynedvl deceased. 

2. Ellin, married to Edward Foulke, lace of Gwynedd, 
dee d . 

3. Jane, married to W Dl John of Gwynedd, also deceased. 
Hence it appears that Thomas Foulke & John Evans were 

Second Cousins, as beiinr each of them Great grand children 
of Ellis "Williams ahovenamed. 

Evan Robert Lewis was an honest sober man — lived in 
Fron Gooh [Fron Gqeh'j. He had five Sons, viz* 1. John 
ab Evan.. 2. Cadw r ab Evan. 3. Owen ab. Evan. 4. Griffith 
C:b Evan and 5. Evan ab Evan. 

John ab Evan had three sons and three daughters by his 
first wife, viz ? (a.) Cadwalader. (b.) Robert, (c.) Griff, (d.) 
.Margaret, (e.) Gwen. (£) Catharine. 

The Second Son (b.) Robert came to Pennsylvania and 
. settled at Abington and left Issue. 

(c.) Griffith, the youngest son of the said John ab Evan 
same also to Pennsylvania, had issue two Sons and one 
daughter, viz : Evan Griffith late of Gwynedd dec d and John 
Griffith late of Mcrion dec d . Their sister married Thomas 
^ones, late of Merion deceased. 

The said (1) John ab Evan- had issue by a second wife 
vlx* (g.) AVilliam John, (h.) Rowland John and (i.) Gainor 
fohn. William the eldest Son settled in Gwynedd and left 
••s?ue. (d.) Margaret their sister died on Sea and left issue 

"o daughters, viz: Gwen who married Thomas Foulke oi^ 
' f'.vynedd and Gainor who married Robert Humphrey also 
■■*' Gwynedd. 

Hence it appears that the said Gwen & Gainor were second 

susins to John Evans of Gwynedd late deceased, as he was 

Grandson to Evan ab Evan (5) they Grand daughters o{ 

• r ohn ab Evan (1) wjio was a Brother of the said Evan ab 

.•"an (o). 

(*2.) Cadw' ab Evan son of the said Evan Robert Lewis 

! ."d without issue. 



I 



Some of the Descendants of Ecan Robert Tjeiei*. 205 

(3.) Owen ab Evan had three Sons and two Daughters viz 1 
1 2 s i . 4 *> 1 

Robert, Owen and Evan, Jane and Ellin. Robert, one of 

the Sons, came to Pennsylvania and settled in' Morion, and 

left Issue four Sons and two daughters, viz : Robert, Owen, 

Evan and John, Gainor & Elizabeth. 

4 

Jane, one of the Daughters of the said Owen ab Evan 
came here married Hugh Roberts who had issue three Sons 
viz* Robert, Owen, and Edward — The two hitter lived and 
died in Philadelphia. Robert settled in Maryland. Each 
of them left Issue. 

5 

Ellin, one of the Daughters of the said Owen ab Evan 
[wife of Cadwalader Thomas*] died in AYales, but her Son 
John Cadwahrder lived and died in Philad\ the late Doctor 
Cadwalader being his Son and the present John Dickinson 
his Grandson. 

(4.) Griffith ab Evan had four Sons and one Daughter 

1 2 3 4^ 5 1 

viz: Hugh, Edward, Robert, David, k Catharine. Hugh, 
one of the Sons, came here, settled in Gwynedd, died there, 
and left a numerous issue. 

2 

Edward, second son of the said Griffith ab Evan, died in 
"Wales. His son Griffith Edward came here with two of his 
Sisters viz : Jane and Margaret. Jane married to John 
Jones of Montgomery and Margaret to David George of 
Blockley. 

3 

Robert, another son of the said Griffith ab Evan died at 
Sea. Two of his Daughters arrived here. Catharine one o'i 
them was married to William Morgan of Montgomery. The 
other sister died single. 

5 

Catharine, the only daughter of the said Griffith ab Evan, 
came here, was married to Jn° Williams o^ Montgomery, 
left issue, died at a very advanced age. 

(5.) Evan ab Evan, youngest Son of the said Evan Robert 

n. 

Lewis, had issue by his first Wife two Daughters and bv 



20G Some of tlic ]\secn<l<i,its of Em,) Rtybrrt hems. 

the latter wife four Suns and one Daughter viz. Thomas, 

2 3 4 5 ft. 

Robert, Owen, Cadwalader & Sarah. One of hid Daughters 

by the first wife had issue two Sons. Robert Jones, one of 
the Sons settled in Gwynedd and was a County Magistrate 
many years and left issue. His Brother Cadw r died at Sea 
and left issue. 

Thomas, eldest Son of the said Evan ab Evan arrived in 

2.3.4. 5 

Pennsylvania wi th his Brethren & Sister with- many other of 
their Relations in July 1G98, and settled in Gwynedd, hav- 
ing taken up the whole township between them. The said 

i 
Thomas lived to a very advanced age, and left issue four 

Sons and two Daughters, viz. Robert, Evan, Owen & Hugh, 
Lowry and Sarah. 

2 

Robert, the second Son of Evan ab Evan died in Gwyn- 
edd, had two Sons Evan and Hugh and three daughters, viz. 
Lowry, Ann and Mary, who were all married and left issue. 

3 

Owen ab Evan, third Son of Evan ab Evan did not arrive 
to great age, left issue Evan, Robert, Thomas, John, Cadw r , 
and Elizabeth, who have all left issue except John and 
Cadw r . 

Cadwalader ab Evan, youngest Son of the said Evan ab 
Evan, arrived to great age and left issue one Son and one 
Daughter, viz. John Evans, late of Gwynedd, deceased, and 
Sarah married to John Hank. 

5 

Sarah the Daughter of the said Evan ab Evan had issue 
by Evan Push two Sons and four Daughters. 



A Register of $fam<Hfto cod Death*, .ISO?. 207 



A REGISTER OF MARRIAGES Aj£P DEATHS, 1802. 

(Continued fiorn page 107.) 

Deaths. s 

In this city Jan. 2 Benjamin Brown., of Massachusetts. 

At Bethlehem Pa., J any 2 Bishop John Ettwein, aged SI years, 
Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church of Unitas Fratrum. 

At Burlington Jany -1 John Kinsey Esq LL.D., Chief Justice of the 
State, aged 70 years. 

At his house in Bristol Uvp. Bucks Co., on Jany. 1, in the 77th year 
of his age, John Brown, for many years a Representative under the old 
Constitution, for that county. 

In this city, Jany. 14' Alderman John Jennings, aged 75 years. 

On Jany. 17th, John llerst aged 00 years. 

In this city, Jany. 22, John Maxwell Nesbit, in his 75th year. 

On Jany 27, Samuel Miles, house-carpenter. 

In this city Jany 28, John Cooper, house carpenter, aged 59 years. 

At Dover, Del,, Jany. 27, Mrs. Lavinia Rodney Fisher, wife of John 
Fisher Esq. and daughter of Col. Thomas Rodney. 

On Feb. 6, at Pennsylvania Hospital, George Lee, a student of medi- 
cine in the University of.Pennsylvania. 

At Nixington N. C, Mrs Joanna Shaw, wife of John Shaw, and 
daughter of James Stuart, of this city. 

At Dover, Feby. -4th, John Yining, Esq., member of the Senate of 
Delaware. 

At FortrJames (Georgia) on Jany 1, Dr. William A. M'Crea, late 
from Philadelphia. 

At his seat in Andover, Massachusetts, after a lingering and painful 
illness, the lion. Samuel Philips, Lieut. Governor of that Common- 
wealth. 

At Barhadoes, on December 25th hist, Mrs. Hustler, wife of Mr. Wil- 
liam Hustler, and ilaujrlrter ofOcorge Mead, E- q.. all of this city. 

At Georgetown, on, the night of Fehy. 10, Mrs. Rebecca Stoddart, the 
wife of Major Benjamin Sftoddart, late Secretary of the Navy of the 
United States. 



208 



A Register of Marriages and Death?, 1S02. 



At Baltimore, on Feb*. 15, Mrs. Ann Eleanor Williamer, aged one 
hundred and three years, three months, and fourteen days. 

In this city on Feb. 17 Mr. John Lynn,' in the S4th year of his age. 
He was a native of this city, and spn of Mr. Joseph Lynn, one of .the 
first shipwrights that arrived here with the Proprietary. 

On Ecb. 27, Mr. William Clifton, an ancient and respectable inhab- 
itant of the District of Southwark. 

At Lancaster Borough, on Feb. 13 Jame3 Alexander, sergeant-at- 
arms for the Senate of this State. 

At Port Republican, [on November 13, 1801,] of a bilious fever; Capt. 
Jam^s Smith, of this city. ' 

On Feb. 27, after a lingering and very afflictive illness, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Chalk, wife of Mr. John Chalk, proprietor of "Chalk's Circulating 
Library." 

The same day, Mr. Peter Knight 2FA. SO. 

In this City, on March 15, Mr. Charles Young, Merchant, JEX. 51. 

On March 17, one of the Indian Chiefs of the Shawanee Tribe, who 
lately arrived here on their return from the seat of government. His 
remains were interred with military honours, and his funeral attended by 
the Tammany Society. 

On March 4, the Hon. John Sitgreaves, Esq. Judge of the Court of 
the United States for the North-Carolina district. He served some time,, 
as an officer in the Revolutionary war. Ai\cr the peace he was chosen 
a Member of Congress under the Confederation. He was repeatedly 
elected a member of the Legislature of North Carolina for his native 
town, Ncwbern ; and for several years past he held the office of which 
he died possessed. 

On March 28 Gunning Bedford, Esq. one of the alderman of this city, 
JEt, 83. 

Suddenly, on March 31, in the 73d year of his age, James Moore, 
Esq., Associate Judge for Chester Co. 

On April 20 of a sudden illness, Mr. John Stille, sen. an old and 
respectable inhabitant. 

Same day Capt. Philip Hollock, JKt. 5-1. 

On April 2S Col. William Coats, Esq, of the Northern Liberties. 

On Saturday, May 22, at 12 o'clock p. m., Mrs. Martha Washington 
terminated her well-spent life. Composure and resignation were uni- 
form during seventeen days' depredation of a severe fever. From the 
commencement she declared that she was undergoing the final trial, and 
had long been prepared for her dissolution. She took the sacrament 
from Dr. Davis, imparted her last advice and benedictions to her weep- 
ing relations, and sen? for a white gown, which she had previously laid 
by for her last dress — Thus in the chising scene, as in all the preceding 



A Befjstyr of Marriages and Deaths, 1S02. 209 

ones, nothing was omitted. The conjugal, maternal, and domestic 
duties had all been full; lied, in an exemplary manner. She uraa the 
worthy partner of the worthiest of men, and those who witnessed their 
conduct, could not determine which excelled in their diilcrent char- 
acters, both were so well sustained on every occasion. They lived an 
honour and a pattern to their country, and are taken from us to receive 
the rewards promised *.o the faithful and just. 

On May 31, Mr?. Deborah Field, wife of .Mr. John Field of this city. 

On May 4, aged 40 years, Andrew Douglas, esq. of the house of 
Morgan and Douglas, of this city. 

Suddenly, on May S, Mr. Robert McKcan, son of his Excellency the 
Governor of this Commonwealth. 

At Charleston, June 5, William Logan, Lsq t) a native of the State of 
South Carolina, aged 75 years and 6 months. Mr. William Logan, was 
a grandson of George Logan, Esq. one of the first settlers in this State, 
who came from Aberdeen, Scotland, a colonel in the British army then 
stationed in Charleston. 

In this city, on June 29, Mr. Thomas Poultney, ironmonger, in the 
26th year of his age. 

On July 7, Mr. John Bartholomew, for many years a respectable sugar 
refiner of this city. 

Suddenly, in New- York, on July 4, in the 78th year of his age, Mr. 
James Bivington, an old and truly respectable inhabitant of that city— 
a native of Great Britain — but many years an eminent printer and book- 
seller in New- York. 

Died at Winchester, Virginia, on July 6, Gen. Daniel Morgan, in the 
GGth year of his age. To enumerate his heroic exploits during the eon- 
test witli Great Britain, which ended in the establishment of the inde- 
pendence of the United States, would require the pen of a more able 
panegyrist. Should the writer of this article make the attempt, the 
subject would be too copious for a newspaper. History has done justice 
to his name, and will hand it to posterity as" an example of cool, 
undaunted and determinate bravery. Suffice it to say that his expedi- 
tion to Quebec, in which he surmounted, with his brave associate, to the 
astonishment of his country, every difficulty and danger which human 
nature can be exposed to ; and the battle of the Cowpens, in which he 
completely routed, and captured a superior force, will long be themes on 
which an American tongue will delight to dwell. Xo man knew better 
how to gain the love and esteem of his men ; where he led they always 
followed with alacrity and confidence. For his victory at the Cowpens, 
Congress presented him witli a medal of Gold, and the Legislature of 
Virginia an elegant sword and a pair of pistols, as testimonials of the 
exalted opinion they entertained of his great military genius. 
VOL. XXIV. — 14 



210 A MtyUtor of 31<>rr!«</cs and .Deaths, ISO?. 

On July 1~>, Mr. Robert Aiken, Printer and Bookseller, an old and 
mucli respected citizen. 

On Sept. 4, filler a rew hours' sickness, of a cholera morbus, at his 
seat on the Conestoga, in the vicinity of Lancaster, lYnna., Gen. Edward 
Hand in the 5S,th year of his age — This gentleman was a, native of Ire- 
land. He arrived in this country before the Revolution ; and during 
that period entered the Continental Army and rose to the rank of 
Adjutant-General. In this character he rendered important services to 
his country. After the war he retired to the practice of physic, a pro- 
fession in which he had been, brought up. In the year 1798, he was 
appointed a Major-General in the Provisional army of the United States. 
As a physician lie was eminently useful ; ever ready to the calls of neces- 
sity and distress, neither poverty nor condition were consulted in his 
visits. The. benevolence and humanity, he evinced in LrratuitousIvLdvino; 
his professional aid to the poor and rick, crown all the distinguished acts 
of his life ; and will cause his name to be long revered, and long lamented, 
by those who have experienced his assistance, and who may stand in 
need of medical aid — Affectionate as a husband, tender as a parent, and 
useful as a citizen and physician, he has left a disconsolate widow and 
six small children, with a numerous circle of friends and acquaintances, 
to bewail his decease. Mulfis Hie bonis flebillis occidit. 

On Oct. 7, in the 42d year of his age, Isaac Xorris, Esq. a native of 
this city. 

On Oct. 24 Mr. Camless Wharton, son of the late John Wharton, 
Esq., of this city. ) 

At Burlington, Oct. 20, in the S2d year of her age, Rachel Ofiley, 
widow of Daniel Oftley, deceased — She was a native of Philadelphia, 
and much respected as an elder of the Women's Meeting of Friends in 
this city. 

On Oct. 26, of the prevailing fever, in the 57th year of her age, 
Hannah Jacjcson, wife of daleb Jackson of this city. • 

On Oct. 27, Mrs. Lucy Yard, wife of Captain Edward Yard, of this 
city; she fell a victim to the prevailing fever ; she was a bride and a 
corps in the short space of five days. 

On Oct.- 29, at his seat in the County of Philadelphia, Samuel Howell, 
J Ml., Esq. 

On Oct. 30, of the prevailing fever, Mrs. Catharine Dacosta, wife of 
Capt. Joseph Daeosta, of the Northern Liberties, in the 30th year of her 
age. 

On Nov. 7, .Et. 40, Mrs. Mary C. Lohra, wife of Peter Lohra, esq, 
of this city. ' 

On Nov. 10, after a long and tedious illness, John Lcacoek, e.-q. in 
the 73d vcar of his age. He wa> a native of thu citv, and Coroner for 



A BrrjlMcr of Jlornru/cs and Deaths, 1802. 211 



the city and county of Philadelphia for the space of 17 years, and has 

uniformly testified hU gratitude by executing the duties of his Office with 

the strictest fidelity. 

On the 2-3th ult., of a lingering consumption, Mr. Michael Imnicl, 

aged 67 years. 

On Dec. 1, in the 37th year of his age, Thomas Parr Wharton: 

Very suddenly, on Dec 7 in Berks County, Mrs. Mary Clymer, wife 

of Daniel Clymer, Esq. Attorney at Law. 



212 Skip Registers for the Port of Philadelphia^ 1726-1775, 



20 o o 






| g ^ 


y 




5 s -5 








1 * 3 


c 


Ph p 














<M 


r-i 

• 

'4 






ej 






•5 





c 


"Hi 


5 


O 


*S 


55 





5 




aj 












..-. r- w *"2 > 











r^ 


3 


ri'. 


rs 


>» 


V. 


— 


rj: 


> 


.~ 


O 


""" 


rz 


<"^> 


fa 




tf. 




_— 


7"; 


_r; 


^>- 


n 


** 


r— 


^ 




IL 


ac 


^ 


_~ 


^.^ 


ji, 


•~* 


fa 


<— • 


P. 







r5 


~ 


Pn 


-5- 


v* 




_r; 


fa 


§ 




c 


J3 


*g 


jg 





,3 




Ja 


1j 





V, 


'-- 


5 


H 


^~ 


Jf 





c 




►? 




c 
•-5 






« 




c 
1-3 




H 


r* 






O 


-3 
































fa 



3 
































>— < 


c 

c 

6 


„ .s 




5-i 

C* 1 




3C 

3 






c 

"«3 










* 






tf 




c w^ 




:? 




P5 






fa 




«p 






P^ 






O 




- r . **< 




7~ 




~ 






~ 




— 






- 






fa 




fefi 




fa 




rt 






£ 




5 






s 








































































52 




c 





*~ 




n^ 






rs 




53 






7Z 






r."» 









»-j 




<* 






r*< 




£ 














































K 


































CO 


















1 




















— 














5 


















































J_5 




»c 














-■\ 
















£ 




c 














*i 




t», 












cu 




^ *% 




~? 




= 






i~* 




•"£ 













- Li ™ £ >| 



k-» »— < . r-» h "a 



r3 

c 



'J. 



Z-* 5fc 



*/. X 



DC X 



X 



X 7. 



>: 



Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 213 



IP 



pd 

Cm 
pH 






O 



V- i) OJ 



/■ 



K 



. c 



e5 

C — 

fi 3 

■'Ci ^ 
o Sz 



■a* 

to O 

o 

hi 



1 § 



Ph H 



"O j-j ^ 



c '5 c^ c« •? 
° *S ^ *3 o 



o 



?T. ^ M ri *a 






fr ^ 



to o 



e o 



w K « 



o ^ ~ -u 



>- . , xi . a 

• cj »— i *— --m rl 

^ y C 



I * 3 "§ | 3 I ^. I " % 1 I ^ 



r3 

o 
o 



3 


o 


OQ 


Ph 


Cm 


3 






-C 


3 


OQ 


73 





-Ui 


3C 




to 


p 


E2 


Q 




3? 




O 


rf3 


QQ 


s 




Q 


B 


to 


X 
o 




J3 


J5 


s 


M 


< 


O 


o 

»-3 


s= 








s 












ed 




























































t> 








o 




p-~ 






73 


1) 




^ 


•a 




1 


tc 


J3 


e 


c 


_>, 


QQ 


Ci 


db 


© 
p-^ 


^3 


"3 


■»a 


*-> 


-»j 


Cm 


p-% 


r% 


"fcj 


'r;° 


r^o 


C-, 


C_ 








o 






u 


i_ 


^ 


,3 


_ri 


p 


PQ 


w 


55 


ao 


QQ 


t^ 


CJ 


co 


-*« 


•H 


cc 




CM 


CM 


CM 




Cl 




, 


, 








> 


> 


> 


> 


J 


J 





c 


j) 


o 






K 


fc 


Y< 


^ 


Q 


p 



214 Ship Bcrjistcrs for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775'. 





v. 


o 


o 




C^ 


o 


o 




o 




g 


o 


OS 




»H 


o 


o 




ci 






r-! 








r-t 


g 




•••1 § 


_• 


i; 












o 




*!3 


Jj 


3 


£ 


3 




s 


2 


A 


£5 




1 

1 




*o 


"3 

■73 




IS 




© 
g 


«T 


•-- BR 

:- .v.' 


[ 




13 


PS 

2 




IS 


Bj 


1 


'x 








K 


Ch 




Ph 


S 


• Ph 




T-H 

1 








^■i 












O 








© 












<M 








^ 












t^ 








«n 













Pn 

w 
q 

w 

Pm 
O 

u 

C 



•~5 ig! 



e a £ 1 I & « I . -J 
£*< J ^"l ■«.■■© -T^ 

!> rv* e ^ ->■ 



It: fi 

i-0 > 



Uj 



X 



o ~- 

E 13 



3 **" c 

Ph -e ^ 



n 5 «a ^. -J: ^ 



.2 r ~ ' 



es 






S 


o 


t£ 


^ 


5 
o 




% 


3 




m 


P 


O 


1j 


& 


c 


bfl 


"2j 


to 


*p» 


V- 


3 




O 


O 


P 




P5 








»-. 


ci 


d 




C 


1 


fcJO 


t^> 




*3 


El 

O 


53 


-^£ 


o 


> 
© 


TJ 


•J: 




o 


gj 


o 








B 


jd 


IN 


-»^> 


c 


z^ ■ 


d 


4C 


o 



»-3 ^a (-5 



OU 



X 



PB4 



Ship Jierjista-3 for th* Port of PhilaMplda, 172G-177S. 215 



|* O O 

CA CO O 



r—, 


© 


O 


<M 


T— t 






C 




O 


• 


tf 


d 


CD 


u 


EC 
3fi 






j£ 


CO 










o 


85 


Hi 


£ 


tfi 


a 

h3 






cJ 


o 


^ 


P* 




















































co 




rf 


O 


^2 

"Hi: 






f-3 


C2 














>— 1 










c 




WH 




r~- 


>. 


_, 


. 




■» 


sy 


o 

o 

O 





r3 



O 




. ( 








CO 


d 


f— ( 

3 




2 


O S 


"5 


pi 


c 


7. 


O 


l 





| 


*ri 


< 


c 

t-s hs 




1-2 




O 




^ 


£ 





§ I 



.=; > J w 



j. 



< ^ h$ 















P-. 

£ 
eg 



^2 

o 

c 



c 
a> 



X 






-5 

-2 

o 
CO 



n <; 



21G Skip Registers for the Port of PMadelphw, 1720-1775, 



o o 






Ph Ph 



< 










1^ 


►H 










C- 


►— < 












«J-( 






gj 


j> 4 




P-t 


a: 


a 


*5 


"o :^ 


3 


►-t 






~ 


•T^ 'ZZ 


rn 


K" 


3 


Ch 


^ 


JZ^ — 


jt^ 


c 


O 


36 

< 




> r: 


P-) 






g 


Ph 


o ri 


O 


S 






o 




- 


o 












H 








>-» 




PS 








*"2 




o 








.%« 




Pm 




o 




-d 
















*-< 


§ 


o 

o 

PS 




>> 




H 




3 




o 

— > 




p-» 




o 








O 




P^ 




<} 




fe 












8 













.3 






















^ 




^Lj 






















c 






























6) 






















a 


























'C- 




E* 






















ci 


























»— t 






























J 






















r-< 




Ph 






O 




to 
c 










m 

0. 




P-! 




£ 


■|j 


.2 


O 




Ci 


£ 













09 


X 


j 


'7. 
7^ 


'a? 

J. 


eS 


:o 


a 

/ — I 




tc 


~ 


'5 


'~ 


3 
— < 




7: 


~H 




to 


O 


3q 


s 


~3 


z: 


~ 


.a 


6 


~ 


r 



c X 



J ° 8 ° ■ •§ * I g ■* 



s: 



to 
S5 


5 





is 


X 


3 


E 


c 








^4 


-a 


H 


Eh 



O 


* *•* 


Jx 




« 




^-* 





tf 


i-» tn 


-; 


>» 


P^ 


^ 






>— < 


_ 


r"-4 ■ 




















x 


•^3 


-X 


p2j 




Uj 


• ^ 


X 




•* 





O 



C^ 


* — ; 


rj 


C 


*— < 


w— 


•^ 


r% 






*tc 


cu 






'L 


-=3 


^ 


IC 


1 







CO 



^ >% 



Ship Jleyitlcrs for the Port of ffaladelphia, 1720-1775. 217 



£ g 



1 ~ 



o 
O 

~ o 



d 



•r, .r* 



d 
© 

el 



d =c 



pCS 



o 



fe 



too ~ 
d 



*■* ^aii4^3?S£8 



S Si 

m x 



6 3 



■ji 



ol 



r~; 


o 




J3 


d 

3 


o 
O 




j^ 






53 

O 








^ 






fS 








s 






















i 














. 














o 




























fc 




























O 


3 






^ 

3 








_. 












d 

5: 




















o 














'o 




'.d 




.—« 




M 

o 








S 


Q 






'd 








O* 


d 




d 









g 


o 




rd 


d 


_f.- 




O 


-^-> 


•3 


O 


o 




c 






Ph 


-2 


cj 


d 


U 

3 


*^- 


X 


-1-3 

d 

o 


Hi 


H^ 


o 

--> 


•s 


o 


5 


Cm 

Id 




HI 


5 


* 

-d 


pd 





c 


-5 


,-"', 


,ja 




CO 


2 


J 


■J> 


O 


G 


~o 


o 


Xl 




© 


o 
















O 




»-s 


E-> 




*""i 


Ha 






►-3 


r* 




Hj 




Hj 





X 



w 



to 




c 








5 


£ 


3 


X 


HI 


5 


■H 


Q 


^ 


f^ 


8 


J£ 


Tfi 


X 


St! 


cc 


a 


o 
o 






.d 
O 

Q 

55 



d 
to 






218 Ship Register? for the Port of Fhiladelpk 



S3 
3 

•a 



o 
O 

s 

o 

c 



13 



o o 

04 tH 



></, 17 


26-1775. 


o 


o 




CO 


c 

T. 






"S 


^ 




o 




cj 


*^> 


^ 


^ 


2 


30 • 


^ 




^© 


© 






c 


c 


to 


>— 1 






r— « 


c; 


*> 


m 






3 


o 


o 





















o 
O 


















rH 


















o 
































c3 

^5 




1 


















M 


















> 




















* 




_5 








T3 
2 


>> 

7. 


5 
125 




.5 


4J 

CO 


rt 

2 




^ 




Q 


p 


6 




"5 


_- 


'ci 


'o 


S 




3 




1 


c 


"^ 




c 


^ 


■ ta 


H-i 




sr. ■ 

o 

£ 


O 


>— 1 


o 


»3 <% 


© 


X 

> 
P 


-> 
A 

V 


"a 
OG 


o 


■a 


o 


^ o 


< 


h3 

Ch 

a 
Q 


15 


o 




































H 




































#• 




































O 


5 










s 








, 




g 












IS 


c! 


o 








o 
«-. 

P. 
3 








s 

a 
















c 




< 




















3 




© 








CO 












b 
























X 

O 












O 








o 
















w 


fi 










^ 








.© 




c 




f^4 








« 


,^< 










< 
t-. 








J 




"tc 




3 

o 








> — i 












o 








w 




> 




u* 












O 
o 

CG 








© 
o 

CG 








*tp 




a!' 




o 
55 









i -• o ^ 






M O 



»-a X 









3 



x 



to 



tc 



to 



X 



7. 



J. 



Skip Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1 



775, 



219 



o 








o 






o 






o 




o 






o 






O 






O 






CN 








i-i 






© 

d 

> 

d 
P 






cc 




u 

O 


© 

I; 




!X 












o 

r-i 






o 














d 






.5 




*; 


P 

c 
o 




--> 






^» 






ja 






> 








* 

o 






OQ 






"o 




s 

© 




J& 












— -4 

1j 






c 












rr 






rs 




o 


■t 




T3 












r~ 






ci 














V 






d 




O 


d 




cj 






rt 






3 














i» 






> 

►3 
































*8 

a 


















3 




a) 


O 




fH 






S" 






P-. 
































X 
















































o 












































s 




so 

X. 












































*3 




3 
















































X' 


































.5 






rt 




*r^ 












d 












ci 














3 






r z^ 




pq 




* 


© 






'--^ 








.£ 




p *< 














3 






«. 




-u? 




g 


12 






JP/ 


JC 






5 




"^ 




8 

© 


o 

c 

5 








2 

d 










C5 




s 


d 






© 


£ 




>, 


-s 




CJ 


s 


.5 

in 

o 


5H 




3 
o 






3 


fcfl 

60 


^=2 


© 

x 


C 


p 




X 


x 

*-. 

o 


"3 


ft 


pr. 


X» 
^"1 


-^ ? 


si 


d 




&2 


[© 


^. 


Ph 


o 


f— i 




-5 






g 




o 


o 


fc 


— > 

c 


.1 


*§, 


Li 


c *c3 


be 


6 


o 


P 




S3 

M 


1 


•a 


»-3 


o 




PS 


o 


o 


O 




o 


d 
CQ 




> 


v. 

O 

1-6 


r-i 


X M 




3 


cs 








a 
d 




























?5 






43 






1 

o 












© 






tD 

to 
ci 

P3 




© 
J. 
K 






c3 






a 

o 


















>. 






cc 










o 






C3 






"§< 






rn 






C 














o 






o 




c 






c 






c 






c 






■a 
Eh 








ft 






►^ 






c 




hs 






3 






^ 






C 







l 


3 










CO 

to 






B 


k 


c 

X 


>» 


o 


.« 


d 




>• 










H 


so 
O 


"3 


r3 


Ph 


X 




5 
P-. 




B« 


£l, 


c-» 




ex. 








§ 


O 


c 












C 




•~ 


c 


■3 


•~ 


*jj 


















CQ 


CO 


W 


CQ 


V: 


X 


cc 


QQ 


Wt) 


o 


t- 


o 


r- * 


•^ 


C^J 


OO 


»-« 






^ 


C3 




CJ 




^J 










. 


. 












•J 


> 


v 


a 


o 


i> 


o 


CJ 


ZJ 


o 




o 


CO 


o 


o 




9 


y. 


^ 





220 Ship Registers for the Port of P/tiuuIdphk', 17 20-1775, 



U: 



-^ . r* 





* 








o 


•^ 


p 


fc 


© 


p 


s-T 


o 


« 


*-3 




to 






o 


u 




zs 


-3 


ffl 


O 






o 










y 


3 
























C 












CM 










s 


























o 
















































*-> 

■a 












<f 










^ 


H 




















.3 




§ 












►H 










~-T 


c^ 




















13 




a 












P-. 


| 


^ 


■o 




J© 


■d 

J3 






15 








rf 

3 


>> 




o 


be 13 


. r_< 






2 

15 






&3 


CU 


;* 




«*? 


•^3 






--< 








pH 


>, 


r^i 


c ~ 


^" , 




JJ 


— < 


T. 


*a^ 


P 


3 


"3 


o 


£1 




~"-? 




■ — " 


o 


.2; 


■* 


© 


*© 


c? 


5) 


^ 


S "^ 


M 


r* 





"o 






© » 




S3 





^* 


i— t 


■d 


O 


•d 


~2 


^o 


u 


r 2 


feH 


o 


Pi 




^ 


"S 


"S 




t-. 


r: 


^ 


Tc 


r^ 


o 

p 


Jl 


5 


tT 


~ 


"^ 


rj 


£ 


s 


o 


^3 


^ 


t v 


•-w 


<- r^ 


jH 


~ 


b 


£2 


i?< 


S 


K-( 


c 


-^ 


o 


.— 


'5 


■" 


53 


-d 


^-~ 


o 


Ch 


^5j 


^ 


r 7 , 


^ 


^5 


(j 


~ 


^ 


, r^ 


r 


P-l 




V-4 




^ 


n 




*g 




-a 


1-3 


06 






ft 


o 




—J 


H^ 


r— i 


Ph 


5; 






r^4 


c 


*a 


o 


E> 


fe 


r~l 


r^i 


o 


*S 


o 


»d 


O 


• »H 


55 


^o 




c 


'o 


_I^ 


o 




O 


o 


o 








<£ 






£ 




o 








r" 


^5 




o 

»-3 




C 

i-a 




C 

>-a 


H 


H 
















































O 






,_, 




























-»-> 


















o 






















£ 




















f^ 


•» "t? 




O 






















^ 






p5 






to 










t i 












•— < 








o 




<3 






.& 1 






fcc 














'3 










A 








-J 
o 








O 






o 








H 


O 




o 

p 










| 








GO 




1* 






2 
S 






a 








p_( 


o 




.=] 










■ — j 












•— j 






o 






o 








p 


O 




O 
•-8 










£ 








o 
■■a 




> 












Eh 









cc 



H 

Cm C 



X 



p p 





2 






o 


»2 


CO 


5 




^> 


> 







Xp 


£ 


go 


t^ 


O 


Cl 


eo 






d 


J 


o 


o 



QQ 



Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 172G-177S. 221 



o o c 

w o •£ 



o o 



£ 2 






>. 



00 ~ J~ — 



e y c5 ^ u ^ ^ ?" >: 2 2 s s " ?. r •— S 5 



« B P 






o _ ^ ^ — ** — — ^— i ■ — r> , *- • 

8 "5 - > -3 - c -5 > s % c 



*ll-=- - 






c 



x tc 



C 



4 



o 






c 




.jj 


c 


t _ l 


B* 


< 


~ 


b 


« 


§ 


J 


In 






<y 

*0 


;a 


c_ 


C 


o 


O 


ei 


vy 


V 


X, 




zz 






~ , 


J, 


O 


*- 1 








o 

c 


*o 


c 


Eft 


Eft 


X 


_ 


o 


O 


frj 


cz 


CO 


t 






c 


g" 


55 








»-j 


►^ 


t*1 



w 



O; ft 

o o 

o ,0 



x 



^ 



QG 



222 Slop BccfisterS for the Port of PhiladclphJa, 1720-1776, 



•| || 

i -a 



.A ° 2 

.S3 > 

5 g J 

c a 

M ~? ^s" 

p p g o 

E o * o 



-a ^ * 6 



p§6 



c3 


C-H 


Zr 2 








C-. 


x 


k — i 


O 






02 


r; 


r-< 


















o 


c 


x 


"*"* 






-»o 




jjjj 


cT 




^ 




-UJ* 

X 1 


P 


-/. 

c 


x 


o 


A 


Q 


"33 


e« 


jj> 


"53 


o 


>, 


R 


"-* 


t " 


• { 




.O 


-^ 


00 


r-, 


2 


H 










£ 



a 



■j} 



> 



&4 


»-5 


o 




^H 




r,> 




f— ( 


Cj 


o 




Ph 








t— 1 
1 — t 




h 


<t 




r: 


ti 




o 


>-a 



£ ^ 3 2 


£ H 


Is II 


h 1 ^ 


£ -§ « 9 


m -^r 


g e; ■ o £ rj 


^» -^ 


Z* '£ O .£ 




is S ^ S ° 


* a 


* Ph x H? 


2 O . 


?? Ph -13 7 g 


.5 ^ 


C Cm % «m 


*e <♦_. 


£ ^ S> ^ o 


S CM 


•§ ° 5 ° 


© o 

— > 
co 




5 P- 






"to 






►2 



g 









Ha 










ei 




fc 




s3 


X 






















(h 








*J5 


(h 


>. 


a 


*J3 


O 






jO 










3 














CJ 


"Z3 


S 


n 


r^ 


IT 


^q 


X 


c> 


Z^ 


^ 


0Q 


3 




| 




s 


S 
«.-. 


s 


1 O 


^r* 


o 


-■ 


o 


37 



« CO 



> 


o 

*-> 


o 


CO 


« 


c 


8 


o 


o 


a. 


^ 


o 


»-a 


CO 


-^ 




o 




c 





>> 

co O 



o: 



¥\ 



Ship toilers for the Port of I'hiladdphia, 1720-1775. 223 



O n 



?-. 




3 


"l~ 


*^ 




'J 

ha 


tc 


c 


O 


^ 


„ 




£ 


pj 


C 


__- 




t^ 




—J 
r. 

'■J 


5 


i-i 






> 


— ' 


c 


o 

© 


hi 




° 


g 




*-- 


"v 


£ 


t-* 


"J3 


*x" 

X 


£ 


^1 


~J2 


.5 


CJ 


Eq 


*s 


©. 






£3 


c 


CJ 


jg 




o 


o 


.— . 


a 


■Ju 


s 


sj 






!>• 










*" 


•*a 


r^ 


•■* 


J* 


© 


*5 
O 



© 
O 

"el 



I £.1 



co 



fc, .- rrj 



John C' 
of Ja 

Joseph 


C 




a 
55 


<—< 
o 


3 

.2 

o 

© 

o 
H 








B2 

C 
o 

> 




>— > 



X 



c 
c 



© 



224 Descendants of Jnriics aiui PI (cbc GilUnghnm. ■ t 



RECORD OF THE I)J>SCEXDAXTS OF JAM.ES ANJ> 
PHEBE GILLIXGifAiL 

Births. 

John Hallowell, son of James and Phebe Gillingham, was born the 
11th month (November) 17G3. Died in infancy. 

Martha, daughter of James and Phebe Gillingham, was born the 2nd 
of 2nd month (February) 17G'>. 

Hannah Lewis, daughter of James and Phebe Gillingham, was horn 
the 14th of Gth month (June) 17G7. 

James, son of James and Phebe Gillingham, was born the 14th of 5th 
month (May) 1768. 

Esther, daughter of Jalnes and Phebe Gillingham, was born 1771. 

One infant, the date of birth unknown, died in infancy. 

Mary Gillingham, daughter of James and Sarah Gillingham, was 
born the 30th of the Gth month (June) in the year 1791, at 7 minutes 
before 12 o'clock at noon. 

James Gillingham, son of James and Sarah Gillingham, was born on 
the 11th of the tenth month (October) 1795 at 5 o'clock in the morning. 

Esther Gillingham, daughter of James and Sarah Gillingham, was 
born the 17th of the third month (March) 1798, at § past 12 o'clock 
noon. 

George Washington Gillingham, son of James and Sarah Gillingham, 
was born the 17tb of the 4th month (April) 1S00, at 12 o'clock at noon. 

William Oliittou Gillingham, son of James and Sarah Gillingham, 
was born the 10th of the 5th month (May) 1S02 at 15 minutes before 12 
o'clock at night. 

Henry Bailie Gillingham, son of James and Sarah Gillingham, was 
born the 16th of the 2nd month (February) 1S04, at \ past 9 o'clock 
in the morning. 

Sarah Ann Gillingham, daughter of James and Sarah Gillingham. 
was born the 10th of the 2nd month (February) 1S0G at A past 2 o'clock 
afternoon. 

Lewis Gillingham, >^on of James and Sarah Gillingham, was born the 
5th of the 11th month (November) 180$ at 7 o'clock in the evening. 

Elizabeth Waring Gillingham, daughter oi' James and Sarah Gillii g- 
ham, was born the 12th of the 8th month (August) 1810 at 15 minutes 
before S o'clock morning. 

Charles Gillingham, son of James and Sarah Gillingham, was born 



Descendants of James and Pfiebe Gillingftct-m. 225 

the f.th of the 8th month (August) 1812 at lb minutes past 1 o'clock in 
the morning. 

Mary Anna, daughter of John and Mary Hardwick, was horn on the 
4th of June, IS 23. 

Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of John and -Mary Hardwick, was born on 
the 2oth of February, 1S25. 

Charles, son of M;.ry Nicholson, was horn on the 30th of June, 1831. 

James, son of George W. and Maria Gilliugham, was born on the 8th 
of November, 1823. 

William, son of George W. and Maria Gilliugham, was born No- 
vember 20th, 1S25. 

Catharine Kapp, daughter of George \V". and Maria Gilliugham, was 
born December 8th, 1827. 

Ann Maria, daughter of George W. and Maria Gilliugham, was born 
June 2nd, 1S30\ , " , 

Still born daughter of George W. and Maria Gilliugham, was born 
September, 1831. 

George W., son of George w. and Maria Giiiingham, was born 
August 8th, 1832. 

Sarah, daughter of 'George W. and Maria Giiiingham, was born May, 
1834. 

John D. Giiiingham, son of George W. and Maria Giiiingham, was 
born November 12th, 1835. 

Still born child of George W. and Maria Gilliugham born. 

Caroline E., daughter of George W. and Maria Gilliugham, was born 
November 1st, 1839. 

Josephine, daughter of George W. and Maria Giiiingham, was born 
March 10th, 1841. 

Catharine Rapp, daughter of George \VJ and Maria Gilliugham, was 
born March 1st, 184G. 

William Clinton, son of Heiuy B. and Sarah Giiiingham, was born 
September 1st, 1S2<3. 

Henry D., son- of Henry B. and Sarah Giiiingham, was born March 
1st, 1828. 

George \\\, son of Henry B. and Sarah Giiiingham, was born Decem- 
ber 0th, 1S20. 

James, son of Henry B. and Sarah Giiiingham, was born November 
20th, 1831. 

Elizabeth Rich, daughter of Henry B. and Sarah Giiiingham, was 
born October loth, 1833. 

Lewis, son of Henry B. ami Sarah Gilliugham, was born October 8tlu 
183o. 

Sarah Anna, daughter of Henry B. and Sarah Giiiingham, was born 
July 20th, 1837. 

VOL. XXIV. — 13 



22G DeseouI'Utfs of James and Phchc GllUnglam. 

Marin Louisa, daughter of Henry B. and Sarah Gillingham, was born 
May — , 18.39. 

Esther, daughter of Henry B. and Sarah Gillingham, wa.s born Sep- 
tember, 1S40. 

Emma. Matilda, daughter of Henry B. and Sarah Gillingham, was 
born November Cth, 1S42. 

Thomas Conner, son of Henry B. and Sarah Gillingham, was born 
May 29th, 1845. 

Charles Wood Gillingham, son of Lewis and Margaret Gillingham, 
was horn March 20th, 1834. 

Margaret Thompson, daughter of Lewis and Margaret Gillingham, 
was born February seventh, 1886. 

Robert Rayburn, son of Lewis and Margaret Gillingham, was born 
February 6th, 1S38. j 

Albert Bell, son of Lewis and Margaret Gillingham, was born Febru- 
ary Cth, 1841. . 

Edward Augustus, son of Lewis and Margaret Gillingham, was born 
November 27th, 184 2. « 

Anna Holbrook, daughter of Lewis and Margaret Gillingham, was 
born May.Sth, 1845. 

George G., son of John H. and Anne M. Geyer, was born December 
3rd, 1855. 

William, son of John .H. and Anne M. Geyer, was born August, 
1859. 

'John,, son of John H. and, Anne M. Geyer, was born . 

Harry B., son of G. W. and Anne Gillingham, was born January, '57. 

Sallie, daughter of G. W. and Anne Gillingham, was born January, '59. 

George, son of G. W. and Anne Gillingham was born . 

Harry B., son of II. D. and Mary A. Gillingham, was born Decem- 
ber 5th, 1855 I 

Lizzie, daughter of H. D. and Mary A. Gillingham, was born Decem- 
ber 3rd', 1850. 

Sullie, daughter of H. D. and Mary A. Gillingham, was born Decem- 
ber, 1801. 

Lewis G., son of Frank and Maggie Carey, was born May 31st, 1S59. 

Robert, son of Frank and Maggie Carey, was born June 10th, I $02, 

George F. L., son of Frank and Maggie Carey, was born August iM'th, 
1864. 

James Jun r , son of H. D. and Mary A. Gillingham, was bom April, 
18G2. 

Laura, daughter of Joseph and Lizzie It. Casper, wa< born October. 
21st, 1805. 

Anne Gillingham, daughter of John A. and Anne H. Granville, was 
born August 12th, 1S0C. 






j 
Descendants of James am IPhebe Gillwifheiin. 227 

i 

Harry B. and T. Jefferson, twin ehihlren of J oseph and Lizzie R. 
Casper, were born February 2Sth, .1808. 

Charles Arrison, ton of Levis and Addie Gillingham, was born March 
3rd, I860. 

Wilbur, son of John II. and Anne M. Geyer, was born July 19th, 
18GS'. j 

Sarah Marin, daughter of John D. and Sally Gillingham, was born 
October 2nd, 1571. 1 

Lewis, son of Lewis and Addy Gillingham, was born June 10th, 1K72. 

T. Reeves, son of Ely and Caroline E. Lawrence, was born August 
8th, 1872. j 

Anna M., daughter of John D. and Sally Gillingliam, was born . 

Anna Morgan, daughter of Ely and Caroline E. Lawrence, was. horn 
March 12th, 1874. 

E. M., daughter of J. D. and Sally Gillingham, was born June, 187C. 

•Lewis, son of Albert B. and Jenny Gillingham, was burn August « 

29th, 1877. 

Emily B., daughter of General John G. and Ellen Palmer [Park], 
wa» born at Washington, D.C., December, 1S68. 

William Gillingham, son of Ely and Caroline E. Lawrence, was born 
November 17th, 1S77. 

Josephine, daughter of Joseph and Lizzie R. Casper, was born De- 
cember 9th, 1S77. Died December 11th, 1S77. 

Marriage. 

John llardwick, and Mary Gillingham, married the 22nd of Septem- 
ber, 1813. 

George Washington Gillingham and Maria Dornan were married the 
2nd of January, 1823. 

Henry Bailie Gillingham and Sarah Rich were married the 13th of 
November, 1825. 

Lewis Gillingham and [Margaret Thornton were married the 2nd of 
June, 1833. 

John H. Geyer and Anna Maria., daughter of G. W. and Maria Gil- 
lingham, were married November 30th, 1854. 

Frank Carey and Margaret T., daughter of Lewis and Margaret Gil- 
lingham, were married July 29th, ls5s. 

Joseph Casper and Elizabeth Rich, daughter of Henry P>. and Sarah 
Gillingham, were married January 1st, 1802. 

' Deaths. 
Thebe, widow of James Gillingham and daughter of John and Hannah 
Hallowell, died on the morning of the 4th of 4th month (April) 1819, 
aged 80 years and 9 month?. 



Ij 

I 

J 
228 Descendants of J' noes and Phebe Gittingiiam. 

William CliiTton, son of James and Sarah GiUinghaui, died at St. 
Francisville, Louisiana, on tlic 13th of the 8th' -month (August) 1*25, 
aged 23 years, 3 months, and 3 days. 

Esther, daughter of James and Phebe Gillingham, died on tlie morn- 
ing of the 5th of the 7th month (July) 1831, aged 60 years. 

Martha, widow of Peter i31ight and daughter of James and Phebe 
Gillingham, died on the ISth of the 3rd month (March) 1S32, aged G7 
years, 2 months, and 1G days. 

Josephine, daughter of G. W. and Maria Gillingham, died 1S41, 

aged weeks. 

James, son of James and Phebe Gillingham, died on the morning of the 
22nd of the 1st month (January) 1S33, aged G4 years, 8 months, and S day?. 

Sarah, widow of James Gillingham and daughter of Henry and Jane 
Bailie, died on the evening of the Gth of 5th month (May) 1843, aged 
72 years. 

Mary Nicholson, daughter of James and Sarah Gillingham, died the r 

15th of November, 1849, aged 5S years. 

George Washington, son of James and Sarah Gillingham, died on the 
1st of December, 1SG1, between 11 and 12 o'clock at night, aged G4 
years, 7 months, and 14 days. ; 

Maria Gillingham, widow of George W. Gillingham, died on the 
evening of the loth of November, 1SG5, in the G2nd year or her age. 

Sarah Gillingham, wife of Henry 1>. Gillingham, died on the Gth of 
July, 1SG0, in the 57th year of her age. 

Robert Raybum, son of Lewis and Margaret Gillingham died July 
5th, 1833. I 

Edward Augustus, son of Lewis and Margaret Gillingham, died 
August 24th, 1843. • ] 

Charles Wood, son of Lewis and Margaret Gillingham, died August 
8th, 1S52, aged IS years. 

James, son of G. W. and Maria Gillingham, died March 20th, 1S44, 
aged 20 years.- 

Catharine Happ, daughter of G. W. and Maria Gillingham, died 
November 25th, 1815, aged 17 years and 11 months. 

Catharine Kapp, daughter of G. W, and Maria Gillingham, died 
Sept. 1S4G, aged G months. 

Esther, daughter of Henry 1>. and Sarah Gillingham, died January, 
1S4 [3], aged 2 years and 4 months. 

Josephine, daughter of G. W. and Maria Gillingham, died May, 
1841, aged 10 wck-. 

Lizzie, daughter of H. I), and Mary A. Gillingham, died Februarv, 
18G0. * 

Sallie, daughter of II. D. and Mary A. Gillingham, died December, 
1801. 



Descendants of James and P'hebe Gltllngham. 2:20 



Willie, son of John H. and Anne M. Oeyer, died May, I860, aged 
9 months. 

James, son of H. I), and Mary A., died June 10th, 1864, aged 14 
month.--. 

Edward Conch Cowdcn, died June 5th, 1864, aged 37 years. 

John, son of John H. and Anne 31. Oeyer, died 1SG2, aged 

— , — months. 

Anne H., wife of John A. Granville, died August 30th, 1866, aged 
21 years, daughter of Lewis and Margaret Gillingjiam, 

T. Jefferson, infant son of Joseph and Lizzie B. Casper, died April 
4, 18GS. 

Harry B., infant son of Joseph and [Lizzie] R. Casper, died August 
11, '68. 

Henry D., son of II. B. and Sarah Qiliingham, died May 23rd, 1869, 
aged 42 years. 

Lewis, son of James and Sarah Gillingham, died Sept. 13th, 1S70, 
aged Gl years and 10 months. 

Sarah A., widow of the late E. C. Covrden and daughter of II. B. 
Gillingham, died November 6th, 1873, aged 36 years. 

George W., son of George W. and Maria Gillingham, died May 3rd, 
1876, aged 43 years. 

Esther, daughter of James and Sarah Gillingham, died March 10, 
18S2, aged 83 years, 11 mos., 24 days. 

Henry B., son of James and Sarah Gillingham died August 25, 
1882, aged 78 years, 6 mos., 10 days. 

,/r. Reeves, son of Ely and Caroline E. Lawrence died July 20th, 
1873, at Bridegton, New Jersey. 

Eliz. R. Casper, daughter of II. B. and Sarah Gillingham, died Sept. 
26, 18S6, aged 52 years. 

Anna Morgan, daughter of Ely and Caroline E. Lawrence, died 
January 26th, 1876. 

Sarah, wife of II. B. Gillingham, died July 6th, I860, aged 57 years. 

Sarah Ann, daughter of James and Sarah Gillingham, died Jan. 
18, 1892, aged 85 years, 11 mos., 9 days. 

Emma M.., daughter of H. B. and Sarah Gillingham, died Nov. 14/S8, 
aged 46 years, 8 days. 

Mary A., daughter of John and Mary Ilardwick, died Oct 10, 1887, 
aged 6-1 yeans, 4 mos., 7 days. 

Thomas C. Gil'ingham, son of H, B. and Sarah Gillingham, died 
4-1S-99. . 



230 Notes and Queries. 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 



x> 



U-lotcs. 



Youncei: Branches oe some Noble English Families etving in i 

America. — The following genealogical notes relating to the younger 
branches of some noble English families living in America have been 
copied from an original paper in the collection of 3ir. Ferdinand J. 
Drecr. 

Edw' 1 Lord Leigh of Stoneley Abbey in the County of Warwick (n r 
Coventry) died ab ; 1787 ec left his great Estates abt £-10000 p r Ann* in 
Warwickshire, Staffordshire, Cheshire, & Lancashire, to his Sister Mary 
for life & after her death With* Issue, then to the first' & nearest of his 
kindred, being a male of his Name & Blood, & in default of such heir, 
then to his own ricrht heir forever — Mary Leigh succeeded her Brother 
& died abt ISO? Unm 4 , whereupon the Tarty in tit led to the Inheritance 
under the limitation of Lord Leigh's Will, is sueh as can prove a 
descent from his family in the Male Line — This party is supposed to be 
some one descended from the Honorable Xopher Leigh 4 th Son of Thomas 
the 1 st ' Lord Leigh. This Xopher was born in 1&*M & was baptized at 
Hampstall Pidware in Staffordshire, & had two Sons viz Roger & Ferdi- 
nand, whose representatives in the male line w' 1 be now heirs to the 
Title of Lord Leigh, & to the great Estates aforesaid. 

Sir Frank Standish of Duxbury died abt 8 or i) years ago seised of 
Very great Estates in Lancashire, unm 4 . His Estates are supposed to 
be descendable to his heirs male, of whom the representative is also 
supposed to be one Capt. Miles Staudish, who founded a colony, called 
after the family Estate Dmbury in America. 

The family of Willougbby, descended from a younger Sen of the 1" 
Lord Willonghby of Parham, is wanted as heir to that Title. The last 
Lord who died abt 17G7 came from America. 

The family of Carey Baron ITunsdon in England is aUo supposed to 
have the heir descended from a younger Branch living somewhere in 
America. 

The family of Percy, descended from the ancient Earls of North- 
umberland is also wanted — A younger branch went from Ireland to 
America. y 

The family of Savage, formerly Earl Livers, is similarly wanted. 

The family of Pich. formerly Earls of Warwick & Holland in Eng- 
land, is imagined to have the heir derived from a younger Branch living 
in America. 

So the families of Tracy Yiset. Tracy of Ireland, & Pierrepont Earl 
of Kingston in England. 

Other families there are viz Montague Lord Montague oi Bougbton 
in Northamptonshire, Seymour, Duke of Soimv.-et A: Earl of Hertford 
descended from the prior Branch of the Svvmoura before the present 
Duke. 



Notes and Queries. 231 

Johnstone Marquees of Annandale in Scotland, Parry Viscount Butte- 
vunt in Ireland, Shetiield Lord Shefiieid & afterwards Earl of Muigrave 
in England, 

Pooth Lord Delamere in Cheshire afterw' u Earl of Warrington. 
Leman & Long — lioth English Baronets. 

As Account of a Dissxn given to Graxyille John* 1'en'x, ix 
Philadelphia; January 31, 1852, — Tin's account was found in a 
memorandum book at Wynne Wood. It is in the hand-writing of Mary 
Jones, and signed by her, dated XlOmeworth, 9th month, 15th, 1S">2. 
She was a daughter of William Thomas and ISaomi Walker. She 
married for her first; husband Charles McClenachan, son of Robert 
McClenachan and Amelia Sophia Harrison. For her second husband 
she married Jonathan Jones. He was a son of Owen Jones, Sr., Pro- 
vincial Treasurer oi Pennsylvania, and Susannah, daughter of Hugh 
Evans, of Morion. The hue Colonel Owen Jones, M. C, of Wynne 
Wood, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, was a son of Jonathan and 
Mary Thomas Jones, the latter the writer of the account of the dinner. 

Howard Williams Lloyd. 

"1S52, 1st month 31st. Granville John Penn (a lineal descendent 
of William Penn the first Proprietor of Pennsylvania, through his sec- 
ond wife Hannah Callowhili) arrived in" Philadelphia from England on 
a visit to this country, his friends, relations &c. 

"Mary Penn Oaskell having invited him to dine with her, at her 
residence the beautiful Penn Cottage, on tho evening of the date above, 
the kind invitation was also extended to the family of her brother-in- 
law Peter Penn Gaskell & his sister's children. All of whom' are the 
descendents of William Penn the founder & proprietor of Penna, through 
his first wife Guiieima Maria Springet. The others invited were Pris- 
cilla Tunis, her niece Sarah MeKeever (myself & children, Naomi Morris 
& her husband Levi Morris, Owen Jones and his wife Mary-K. Jones) 
with our friends Patty Humphreys & Mary Bowman. We assembled 
according to appointment at 5 O'clock, for those that were to dine. 
Those that were to sup came later. 

"The first named guest (Granville John Penn) was accompanied by 
William Wister ec John J. Smith of Gennantown. The whole enter- 
tainment was conducted in a very elegant & expensive manner. The 
collected company seeming to enjoy & participate in pleasurable feel- 
ings. My mind at the time was particulars- interested, upon taking a 
retrospective view of the first settlement of this state, by our peisever- 
ing and noble spirited ancestors, and. whilst reflecting on the subject, 
my thought* were arrested by the very peculiar cireumstanee which I 
then in conversation with Granville John Penn mentioned. Of (that) 
so many of the most conspieious characters amongst those, who com- 
menced the settlement and administering the Government at the first 
outset in this the then Province of Penna., should he here represented 
by their descendents being assembled on this occasion. It being now 
1G0 years since ihey came to this favoured land, then a wilderness. And 
though few in numbers, there were then present in that parlor, the 
descendent-t of William Penn by each of hi- wives, & of their near con- 
nections the Aubreys, & Pees Thonuis, also of Thomas Lloyd, the First 
President of Council, ec first Governor appointed by William Penn, 



I 



K ! 

J 



232 Roles and Queries. 

flO.or his arrival in the Province, be was also the first foreman of the 
first grand jury therein convened. 

"The descendants of Thomas Wynne, the first Speaker of the fim 
legislative assembly voted for in the Province and convened in Philada. 
Of James Logan the Corresponding Secretary of William Penn. Also 
descendents of Isaac Xorris one of the most conspicuous & worthy men 
of his day & the Chief Ju.-tice of Perma., during his time. Also Wil- 
liam Piles one of the members of the first ■ Council, likewise Valentine 
Hollingsworth one that assembled as a member of the first grand-jury, 
Anthony Morris the first Mayor of Philada., 

"Homeworth, 9;h Mo: loth 1So2. 



"Mary Jones." 

[The following has been added, altho' of the same date, apparently 
an after-thought.] 

"Having been requested to state in writing, who amongst the com- 
pany assembled at Mary Penn Gaskell's dinner, on the 1st month 31st *• j 
1S52 were descended from those eminent men mentioned as the con- 
temporaries of William Penn during the establishment of the govern- j ; 
nient of Pennsylvania, and his assistants in that eventful and arduous 
task (they 1 believe were all members of the Religious Society of Friends) 
natures noblemen, who loved & feared, honoured & obeyed the Lord 
God of Heaven and Earth, & through the redeeming love of our blessed 
Saviour were enabled to forsake iniquity, and live righteously through- 
out the time appointed for them to labour, working out their souls salva- 
tion according to the will of their adorable Creator, according to the most 
authentic account in my possession (they were) myself Mary Jones, my 
cousin Priscilla Tunis with her niece Sarah McKecver (who) are lineal 
descendents of Pees Thomas & his wife Martini Aubrey, she being the 
sister of William Aubrey the son-in-law of William Penn the founder 
of IVnna. Their son Aubrey Thomas went to England and married 
Gul i el ma Maria the grand daughter of the said William Penn. Naomi 
Morris (the daughter of Mary Jones) through her father Charles McClen- 
achan, is a lineal descendant of Thomas Lloyd, and also of Isaac? Xor- 
ris. Levi Morris the husband of Naomi Morris is a lineal descendant 
of Valentine II ollin<r? worth, also of Anthony Morris. ' 

"Owen Jones the son of the above named M. Jones, with his wife 
Mary R. Jones, lineal descendants of Thomas Wynne & Pr. Edward 
Jones; Patty Humphreys, lineal descendant of Thomas Wynne, William 
Wister a lineal descendant of Thomas Wynne, as also I have been in- 
fanned that his mother was descended from William Piles. John J. 
Smith a lineal descendant of James Logan. 

"Mary Jones." 

Letter or James Irvine ox Indian Affair?, 17t>3, in Collec- 
tion of Mr. Charles Roberts, Philadelphia. — 

M BmuLEHEM November 21. 17CS. t 

"Sir -j 

44 On tht' ICth Inst. Job Chilli way arrived at Ensign Kerns near Fort 
Allen & informed that Papunchay ec about Twenty-five Indians Women t 

& children inclus were on tlmir way down, and. that there weie 15 
Warriors who tor three nights had incamped close by thoni, what was 
their intentions he eould not find out from them, but heard from Other i 



Notes mid' Queries. 233. 

Indians that they had threatened them (Papttnclmy &c°) severely. On 
receiving tin- above Intiliigcnce Colonel Clayton marched on the 20 th 
Inst. with fifty men in hopes of supprizing the Warriors. We were 
out three days, but could not meet with either 1'apunehay or the War- 
riors : The Koads were excessive bad and cover d with snow two feet 
deep. — Job is returned to see what hath detained Papunehay ami re- 
quested me to wait a few days longer for them. 1 arrived here last night 
in Company with Colonel Clayton & received your Letter by the Persons 
who brought up the Horses. I should have returned to Kern's to day, 
but the llorses the men brought up are not able to travel which obliges 
me to stay till tomorrow. 

"Job brought a message which I have sent to the Governor, the sub- 
stance of which is only, to thank him for taking Pity on them ; request 
that he would keep the Poad open, & appoint a place for them to reside at. 

"You may depend upon it, that on their arrival I shall conduct them 
in the best and most convenient manner I am able. 
"I remain, Sir 

"Your Humble Servant 

"James Irvine." 

Dr. Benjamin Rush to Hon. James Wilson, on the Death of 
his Wife. — 

"My dear friend, 

"I lament that a return of my fever has prevented my waiting upon 
you, in order to lessen by Sympathy that Sorrow which our art could 
not prevent. 

"The resources of your own mind, I know will suggest more conso- 
lation to you than you will be able to draw from any other quarter ; I 
shall only add, that among- your dear departed Mrs. Wilson's female 
acquaintances, none lament her death with more distress than Mrs. 
Kush, and among your friends, none can feel more (for none knew her 
worth better) than Dear Sir 

"Your truly afflicted friend & 
"humble Servant 

"Benj* Kush." 

"Frjday 

April 11, 17SH." 

General Sullivan on his trial after the battle of Prandywine said, 
"I would not exchange the privilege ot' an Irish inheritance for all the 
paltry honors of the Western Hemisphere." 

Lord Chatham to Samuel Wharton, 1774. — 

•* Hayes Sunday Evening, 

'•July lu, 1771. 

"Lord Chatham presents many Compliments to M r Wharton, and 
desires to return 11 im more Thanks and Acknowledgments, Than the 
Compass of this Note can convey, lie warmly feels the fluttering and 
kind Testimony, Mr. Wharton doe* 11 im the Honor to bear to hi- Z.-al 
•«»r the Mights of ,,nr American fellow Subjects. May their SnttbrinSM 
be short, and their Freedom X Prosperity immortal ! — Pax est train pi ilia 
Libertas. Lord Pitt is gone to take Leave of Sir Piercy lirett, or He 



- 



234 Notes and Queria 



would have done Himself the Honor To express for Himself — his grate- 
ful Acknowledgments. He leaves this Place, on Tuesday Morning, to 

go to Portsmouth — Where He is to embark. "Lord Chatham hopes, j 

That it will not be long, before Mr. Wharton does Him. the Honor, To 
eat some mutton with Him at Hayes, — Where He will always be ■< 

extremely glad to see Him." 

. 

The Steam Fiugate Ftlton, U. S.'.N. — The following extracts 
from a letter dated New York City, October 30, IS 14, refer to the Ful- 
ton, the first steamship built for the Navy of the United States. Plans for 
her construction were furnished by Robert Fulton in 1813 ; a law was ° 

parsed authorizing her being built, and she was launched October 29, 
1814. In June of 1815, she made her trial trip under Captain David 
Poiter, U. S. N. After peace being ratified with Great Britain, she 
became a Receiving Ship at New York, where she blew up in 1S29 : 

" . . . On my return from Flushing I was presented with a very 
polite imitation . . . to go on board the Fulton Steam boat at Court- 
landt Street wharf, to attend the launch of the Steam Frigate ... we 

lay our steamboat along side and boarded her, through her ports ... a 

was ushered into the presence of Captain Porter, . . . he, with Fulton, 
appeared well pleased with the success of tiie experiment, so far, and I 
also shall be very glad if- Judge Cooper's expectations be realized, that 
she will be the means of ' putting an end to Naval Warfare.' " 

I 

Reply of the Montgomery County Militia Officers to Cir- 
cular Letter of Governor Mifflin, 1798. — When war between 
the United States and France was imminent in 179S, Governor Mirllin, of 
Pennsylvania, addressed circular letters to the Brigade Commanders of 
the Militia. The following is the reply of the Brigadier-General and 
Officers of Montgomery County, who met at Col. John Wentz's, June « 

23, 1793: 

"To His Excellency 

"Thomas Mifflin, 

"Governor of the State of Pennsylvania. 
"Sir. 

"Your Circular Letter addressed to us is not only a confirmation but 
an additional Testimony of your well known Patriotism. We have 
beheld with anxious concern the predicament in which our Country is 
placed by the Arrogance and Insolence of a Foreign Nation ; and with 
one voice join to declare that should an appeal to Arms by our Executive 
be considered as the only alternative to preserve our Honor and Inde- 
pendence we will endeavor to be ready at a moments warning, and we 
are confident that the united Forces of America under the auspices of 
the God of Armies will evince to the World that the Liberty and Inde- 
pendence, secured to us at the expense of so much Blood and Treasure 
cannot be wrested from us. 

"Consistent with the idea we entertain of the prevailing sentiments 
of the Citizens of this Country we undertake to say, that they view in 
its true color the conduct of the French Government towards us, and * 

conceive that if it does not meet with a Manly opposition will ultimately 
hazard the Independence of the United States. Considering such to be 
the sentiments of the Mass of the Citizens of Montgomery County we 



«*.. V . - ■*■ ■^.^.O ,-.»■».■?, 



iVo?e» #»(Z Queries. 235 

nre bold to say, that notwithstanding the defects of the Militia Law 
they will step forward with Alacrity and endeavor Manfully to repel 
every effort which may tend directly or indirectly to affect our National 
Honor. Being thus supported we will never submit to have our Liber- 
ties trampled upon whilst we have strength left to go to War, for we 
would rather resign our existence than our Liberty and Independence. 

"Permit us to conclude with Expressing our wish that your life may 
be spared, with health and that your Country may once more be Bene- 
fited by those Energies of Mind you possess and so well know how to 
bring into action. 

"Signed by order and on behalf of the officers of Montgomery 
County Brigade, 

"Francis Xiciiols, 

"Brig. Gen 1 . 

"Resolved unanimously, That General Nichols be requested to present 
the above answer to his Excellency the Governor." 

Letter of Colonel Thomas Hartley to Colonel William 
Irvine, 177G. — 

"TlCOXDABOGAOct: y*: 15*: 1776 

"D* Coll 

"I arrived here Yesterday from Crown Point with the remains of the 
Regiment — our Fleet has been beat only five vessels left. My possitive 
orders were to retreat from Crown Point should such an Accident happen. 
I send on your papers. Your Money is in the publick Treasury ; we 
shall have warm work soon. The Enmy are approaching we shall be at 
it in a few Minutes — Crown Point is in their Possession. Should any 
Accident happen to me — J have put my Money in the Treasury except 
about 2<»0 Dollars which must run the Chance with myself and Baggage 
should I be killed — I make no Doubt but my Friends and Country will 
do justice to my Family. The important Hour for America is near at 
Hand — I make no Doubt but our officers and men will do their Duty — 
I send this Letter and your Papers to the Care of Doctor Potts at Fort 
George. I hope you will receive them £afe. 

I am D r . Col 1 
"Col l Irvine. ''your real Friend 

w &'mo5t humble Senr* 

"Tho s Hartley. 

"The Enemy were in Sight all the Morning before I left Crown Point. 
I did not loose any Thing and brought off my Guns." 

Letter of President John McKinley, ov Delaware, 177$. — 

President McKinley, of Delaware, wiu taken prisoner by the British, the 

day after the liattle of Brandywine, and confined at various places until 

the evacuation of Philadelphia, when he was taken by ^.-a to New York, 

and then quartered with other prisoners at Flatbush, Loug jV.aml. lie 

was exchanged in Septeml>er of 177$. We are indebted to Mr. Charles 

Roberta for copy of the following letter : 

"Flat Brsu on Lovi Ni.and 
••> A July 177S. 

"I had my Health very well on the Voyage, not even the lea>t Sea- 
sickness, e\: here, I thank God, I enjoy it perfectly, A: hare a pretty large 



- 



23G Notes and Queries. 

District around allowed me to walk or ride about in, which afford* hand- 
some prospects of a very fine & well cultivated Country & of the Ocean ; 
& I am placed at my own desire, with I5rigad r General Irvine as a Com- 
panion, in a very decent, orderly & obliging Family, where we have 
plenty of very good Country Fare, & at a very low rate. \ 

"JXO. McKlNLEY." 
• 
Toby Leecft, of Cheltenham, England, and of Philadelphia and 
vicinity, has so large a number of descendants in and about Philadel- 
phia, that it may be a matter of interest to know he was baptized Toby £ 
in the Parish Church of Cheltenham, England, January 1, 1052, and 

that the record there shows him to have been the son of Toby, thus estab- y 

lishing his descent one generation further than it is recorded anywhere 
to my knowledge. These facts are substantiated in a letter to me from 
Mr. Sier, Parish Clerk, accompanied by a tracing of the original entry 

upon the register of the Cheltenham Parish Church. c 

P. R. P. 
• 

Toby Leech's "Wife. — One of my friends found in the Gloucester ^ 

meeting-books, in Devonshire House, England, the following register 
of Vnarriage : > 

"Toby Leech, of Chelteham, m. 10. 20. 1G79, Esther Ashmeade." 

B. II. S. 

Western Colonization in Amekica. — 

" London*, May 2i», i"i. 

"As I just learn that the ship for Philadelphia is nor sailed, — J send 
you, (as they will give you a good Account of publick affairs) — a Con- 
tinuation of the News Papers. Upon the third Readme: of the Qnebeck 
Pill, in the House of Lords, as Lord Hillsborough had opposed it, 
merely on Account of his absurd objection to Colonization. Wtttivard of 
the Allegany Mountains; and had taken that Opportunity of saying, 
that Jfc had resigned his othce, of American Minister, because He could 
vol adopt the Idea of a new Colony upon the Ohio, — The principal 
Ix>rds of the Minority, Yidzt — The Duke of Richmond, The Marquis 
of Rockingham, and Lord Shelburne, likewise seized that Occasion, To 
express their Opinions upon this Point and they all observed, — that 
wherever the King's Subjects settled in North America, (If there was a 
Communication by Rivers & a small Land Carriage to the Sea) They 
ought to be governed, And that the Establishment of New Colonics, 
was indispensably necessary, to hinder Manufactories from being set up ; 
and more especially, as it was impn*xtbte to prevent the Americans, 
(whose Increase by Population, v\: by an Accession of People from 
Kurope, was beyond all historical Kxamplc) — from travelling & staling 
Westward; and as a very curious Fact respecting this Business, — Surfer 
me also to inform you, — That Lord Hillsborough was so obstinately 
foolish, — as to diride t!i>: House of Lords, upon his ridiculous Idea, rela- 
tive to Colonization WettuwrH; and to bis extreme Mortification, — He 
had not Kern one simjfe Lonl ir the fiiei*l<*\ with ll > k Lord Dartmouth 
& his Lordship, in the Course of the Debate, expressed some an-jry 
words towards each other, — Pat Lord Hillsborough in his Pride & Po- 
tion, gave rise to it; — And you may be ussurinj, Lord Dartmouth will 
not *oon forget it. — This free Communication of Opinions, upon Coloni- 



NoUs and Queries. 237 

zation Westward, ec all the Lords in Ojtpotitum concurring in the 
Fitness of establishing of the Colony of Yandaiia, v. ill, you may fully 
rely on it, (I specif; from Authority) occasion our business to be taken up 
& finished, as soon as Parliament is risen." 

Letter of Jasper Yeatjbb to Benjamin Franklin and James 
Wilsox, 177*5. — 

•' Lancaster July C, 177(*<. 

"Gentlemen* 

"I have received your Favour of the 4 th Instant this afternoon, and 
conceive it my indispensable Duty to inform you without delay that I 
chearfully acquiesce with the Appointment -of the Honourable Congress. 
My Company's being under matching Orders to Trenton, makes my 
Separation from them somewhat uneasy to me ; but I submit, and shall 
be "Very happy in rendering my "Country any Services, however small, 
in the Station assign'd to me. Be so good, Gentlemen, as to express, my 
most grateful acknowledgments to the Congress for the Honour — they 
have done me. I shall expect to hear from you again as soon as your 
more Important Business will admit. • and am 
"Gentlemen : 

"Your most Obed & Hum blc Serv* 
, . "J. Ykate-s. 

"Honble. Benjamin Franklin & James Wilson Esq"" 

Letter of William Penn to Robert Harley. — 

"170G, July 14 — My son has sent me so melencholy a story upon our 
friend's answer to him I. must break out into complaints upon him after 
many promises of providing for my son here, and Booth in Ireland, and 
speaking of nothing less than GOO/. per annum for reasons he knows and 
thou mayst guess, he talks now of speaking of my son to the Duke of 
Ormond for a foot company in Ireland, which to say no moie, is mean. 
Ned Southwell secret [ary] of that kingdom, and my son captain of a 
foot company, he shall £o dig potatoes first, lie is entitled to a better 
estate in that kingdom than to take up with so mean an employment. 
Besides, it was a civil employment he chose for him and promised him, 
showing his aversion to a military employment as well as myself. 1 beg 
of thee to urge tor a civil employment though in Ireland, of 5 or COO/. 
per annum or give him 1000/. to pay bis two years expenses in fruitless 
waiting, and let him go iive of his own. If my steady — and secret and 
public — regards for the Queen'.- ser\1ce, divers ways — that every body 
had not the power or talent to do befcide myself — have so mean a con- 
clusion—to say nothing of the worry the Lords Commissioners for Trade 
&c. have brought upon me, by a long and fruitless attendance and ex- 
pense — from my country, to keep it — it is high time to r. tiro, and lament 
our unhappiness. But my poor son may have this just reflection, am) 
I the satisfaction, of his peeing his conformity to the world to be his 
ruin,- instead of his advancement," and I can forgive our great friend, if 
thut could lie hi-> reason for slighting him, I have opened myself very 
freely to thee, boar it. perhaps it will be the la<t time, and thy easy 
methods, so much thy .honour and tvUdom, have piyen me the presump- 
tion to believe thou wilt both help and forgive. Thy most faithful and 
Unhappy friend." 



■M.nto'K^ti*.*; t i m'MlH*\. ,i — ^U. - .«.«.*. -, -ififc_ •/« /*fc^«^i.'.'*i^._ 



238 Notes and Queries. 

HUMFHRKY-OWES — EXTRACTS >KOM A WELSH TKACf CONVEY- 
ANCE.— 

Know all men by this present writing trmt John Humphrey of the 
Welsh Tract, County of Philadelphia, Province of Pennsylvania for 

the natural affection that he beareth to Joshua Owen, his nephew, and 
also in pei formance of a covenant by him made at or before the mar- 
riage between the said Joshua Owen and Martha his now wedded wife, 
Hath given granted . . . unto the said Joshua Owen a certain tract of 
land bounded on the north side by the land line of Rowland [Ellis?] 
and Philip Price, and sue to. a corner post, by the land of Llewleyn [?], 
and bounded on the south side . . . land of Benjamin Humphrey to a 
corner post of maple tree markt with David Bhydderch,.and so east- 
ward bound by said David Phyddereh to place of beginning containing 
100 acres . . . under the yearly Quit Pent to the Chief Proprietor of 
the land and the said John Humphreys and his heirs, to the use of the 
said Joshua Owen his heirs o\:c. . . . 

Pennsylvania Continental Officers at Close of the Devo- 
lution. — After our War for Independence the Department for ,War 
rnade'up lists of " Oftieers of the Continental Army who served to the 
end of the War and acquired the right to Commutation Pay and Bounty 
Land,'' from which the following names of Pennsylvania officers have 
been copied. The original spelling has been retained. 

Alexander, William, Major. Butler, Percival, Lieutenant. 
Armstrong, John, Major A. D. C. Bluer, George, " 

Armstrong, James, Captain. . Bevins, Wilder, " 

Ashton, Joseph, Lieutenant. Barclay, John, ■' 

Armstrong, John, " Boyd, John, " 

Alison, Pobert, " Benstead, Alex., " 

Adams, William, Surgeon. Bryson, Samuel, " 

Alison, Richard, Surg. Mate.. Binncy, Barnabas, Hosp. Surgeon. 

Beatty, Beading, Surgeon. 

Butler, Richard, Colonel. Brown, Joseph, " 

Brodhcad, Daniel, 

Butler, William, Lt. Col. Chambers, Thomas, Colonel. 

Bayard, Stephen, " Craig, Thomas, " 

Butler, Thoimuj, Captain. Church, Thomas, Major. 

Bartholomew, Benj. " • Craig, Isaac, " 

Burke, Edmund, " Carnahan, James, Captain. 

Bush, John, " Christie, James, " 

Becker, lleniy, " Campbell, James, ■ " 

Brady, Samuel, M Claypoole, Abr'm G., " 

Bowen, Thos. B., " Coltman, Pobert, " 

Botide, Thomas, " Craig, Samuel, " 

Bankson, John, " Cobea, John, " 

Bowen, Jacob, " Carberry, Henry, u 

Bush, George, " Crawford, William, " 

Bunner, Jacob, " Craig, John, M 

Boyce, John, " Chri-tie, Juhn, " 

Boyer, Peter t " Clark, Johu, " 

Bond, Thomas, Purveyor. Collier, Joseph, Lieutenant. 

Butler, Edward, Lieutenant. Cramer, Jacob, H 

Beatty, Ekuries, " Crosley, Je>sc, 

Hull, Blackall \\\. " Crawford, Edward. " 



Notes and Q 



nerves. 



OO 



39 



Campbell, James, Lieutenant. 
Crawford, John, " 

Clockner, Christian, Ensign. 
Cowell, John, Hosp. Male* 
Coventry, John, " 

Dunn, Isaac Budd, Capt. A. D. C. 
Davis, John, Captain. 

Doyle, John, " 

Douglass, Tliomas, " 
Duncan, James, ** 

Donnell, Nathaniel, " 
Doyle, Thomas, Lieutenant. 
Dungan, Thomas, " 
Dennv, Ebenezer, " 
Dunn, AbnerM., 
Dover, And rev.', " 

Dixon, Sankev, " 

Davis, LleweUvn, 
Pe3larcelIin,A.C., " 
Doty, Samuel, " 

Davidson, James, Surgeon. 
Dareey, John, Hosp. Mate. 
Derrick, Michael, " 
\ 

Edwards, Evan, Major. 
Enics, Worsley, Captain. 
Envin, James, Lieutenant. 
Everley, Michael, " 

Frank, David S., Major A. D. C. 
Kontleroy, More, Major. 
Fishbourne, Bcnj., Capt. A. D. C. 
Finney, Walter, Captain. 
Finley, John, " 

Finley, Joseph L., " 
Freeman, Jeremiah, " 
Ferguson, William, " 
Fick, David, .Lieutenant. 
Fullerton, Richard, " 

Crier, James, Major. 
Gosnor, Peter, Captain. 
Gray, William, " 
Gill, Erasmus, " 
Gamble, .lames, Lieutenant. 
Greer, Henry, M 

Guthrcy, George, " 
Griffith, Levi, *" " 

Glentworth, James, " 
Gilchrist, James, " 
Graham, Stephen, Ho<p. Mate. 



Hand, Edward, Frip. Gen. 
Humpton, Richard, Colonel 
Harmar, Josiab; Lieut. Col. 
Hubky, Adam, 

Hay. Samuel, " 

Hamilton, James, Major. 
Hubley, Bernard, Captain. 

Hopkins, David, 
Heard, John, M 

Humphrey, Jacob. " 
Ilenderson, Wiiliam, " 
Honeyman, William, Lieutenant. 
Hallett, Josiah, " 

Howell. E/.ekiel " 

Huston', William, ■ " 

Herbert, Stewart, " 

Henderson, Andrew, H 

Hughes, John, 
Hicks, Jacob, ' 
Hughes, John, M 

Harper, John, u 

Humphreys, John, <f 

Henley, Henry, u 

Hammond, David, l \ 

Harris, Robert, Surg. Mate. 
Henderson, Gustavus, " 

Irvine, William, Brig. Gen. 
Irwin, John, Captain. 
Irvine, Andrew, " 
Irvine, Matthew, Surgeon. 

Johnston, Franei>, Colonel. 
Jackson, Jeremiah, Captain. 
Janriey, Thomas, Lieutenant. 
Jones, James Moses, " 
Johnston, Andrew, " 

Johnston, Robert, Phy. and Sur- 
geon. 
Jones, James, Surgeon. 
Jones, David, Chaplain. 

Keen, Lawunee, Capt. A. D. C. 
Kennedy, Samuel, Captain. 

Lusk, William, Captain. 
Lee, Andrew, Lieutenant. 
Lambert, Chevalier, u 
Lvtle, Andrew, " 

liodge, r.enj., " 

LcLoy, Gcoru'C, " 

Lloyd, Jaiacs, M 



24 (3 



-Vcv.j ~ : V •'.. 



. I ■ " 

.:■-■ ..... 

Mas 

I :. L r . ■ .-. .- -. 
J 

M • Mat: : i 

- I ..- . -.: 
. ." ■". - !' 

; / .. 

:L-:.t 
. | N I " 

- 

lie . 

I 

- 
■ - 



II ;a:a^, Capf im: 

I'i;">.-r.: _-__-- !:::- 

} - r .' 7:_... " 

I .- I.: 

1- . . - 

E : 

Pite, Zei.oloa, 

£ . ;:" . - - 

- - , - 

r „- 

: ; : 

: -. : .- 
:- .-■■ - :. .- 

E : . ■ . 

: - : - ■ 
7 . ^ .---_■.". 



rl:'.:r-:z __ :- L _: ?. 

: . '.. < :;. : 

T . : : " 

: 

! 

: 

K 

' 

] 

- - : " - j 

- : - 
s 

- - 

44 






■KK 



Notes and Queries. 



241 



Stake, Jacob, Captain. 

Simouds, Jona.% " 

Stewart, William, Lieutenant. 

Shrander, Philip,. " 

Strieker, John, " 

Smith, James, " 

Sullivan, John, " 

St. Clair,. Daniel, •" 

Smith, Nathaniel, " 

Spear, Edward, " 

Strieker, John, " 

Smith, Peter, 

Story, John, u 

Stuart, Alexander, Surgeon. 

Smith, Wm. Hooker, Surg. Mate. 

Saple, John A., 

Stevenson, George, Hosp. Mate. 

Tilghman, Tench, Lieut. Col. A. 
P. C. 

Talbot, Jeremiah, Major. 
Tudor, George, " 

Turnbuli, Charles, Captain. 
Talbert, /Samuel, " 

Tilden, John B., Lieutenant. 
Thornbury, Francis, " 
Thompson, William, . " 



Taylor, Christopher, Surg. Mate. 
Thompson, Joseph, " 

Vernon, Frederick, Major. 
Van Horn, Isaac, Captain. 
Vernon, Job, " 

Van Lear, AVilliam, " 
Van Court, John, Lieutenant. 



Wayne, Anthony, Brig. Gen. 
Walker, Andrew. Captain. 
Wilkin, Kobert,' " 
Wilson, William, " 
Weaver, Jacob, " 

Wilson, James, " 

Woelper, John D., '* 
Wigton, John, Lieutenant. 
Weitzel, Jacob, fi 

White, Francis. " 

Ward, John, 
Webster, John P.. " 
Weidman, John (1 st ), " 
Weidmau, John (2 l ), " 
Wharry, Robert, Surg. Mate. 
Wilkins, John, 

Younjr, Marcus. Lieutenant. 



"Fish House Punch," as brewed at the ' % Commercial Rooms,' 
Philadelphia.— 





Gallons. 






1 


2 j 3 


* 


5 | 6 : 7 ! 


S 1 9 j 10 1 It i 12 


Mixture. 


— 









— . — 1 


|— -| — j | 


Jamaica spirits (pints) .... 


1 


2 | 3 


4 


5 


6 : 7 j 


8 j 9 j 10 j 11 12 


Brandy " .... 


M 


i IK 


2 


2)* 


3 Vyj 


4 l}4 5 jStf, 6 


Teach brandy " .... 


Vs 


vA% 


% 


% 


Vx A j 


1 liM Vi V* I. 1 ,' 


Keceipt for Punch. 




1 






, ! 


! i 1 i 


Mixture as above (pints) . . . 


V4 


3« \iX 


C>» r *Mj«K U>* 


13 H"; 16^ Vli »*■ 


Lemon juice " ... 


H 


l ltf! 2 ,<>}<■ 3 "«_: 


-J *}$ 5 Vi 6 


Water find ice " ... 


*K 


9 :i3>.i is 22% 27 siy:. 


X 10M «5 -»v\ SI 


S"{T>vr (rounds) 


2 


4 | 6 | 8 


io 12 n 

1 


16 IS 20 22 24 



1 pound ice - ■ 1 pint water. 

Isi,a\i>s is THE Kivkr Dr.r.AWAi'.r:. — Extract from tlie Kepnrl t*( 
the Lords Ci»m:ni»ioners for Trade aiul Plantations.' data] »• Whitehall 
March 17th, 1772, on the Petition of the Kijrht Honorable th>' Karl <>f 
Rochford, One of his Majesties principal Secretary* of m. v &c. »vo. Ac." 

VOL. XXIV.— 1G 



242 Notes and Queries, 

"As to the Objection stated in the Report of 175G, against making 
"any Grant of the Islands in the River Delaware, until a Determina- 
"tion had been had upon the dormant Claim* of the Proprietaries of 
11 Pennsylvania, it does appear to us, from the fullest Consideration of 
"the Evidence laid before us to support that Claim, that it is of such a 
"Nature, that it ought not, either in Justice or Reason, any longer to 
"restrain your Majesty from the Exercise of your Majesty's Right in 
"those Islands, in such manner, as your Majesty shall think fit, and the 
"just aud reasonable objections stated in the same Peport, that the Peti- 
tioner 1 had no Foundation to entitle Him to ask or expect a Bounty 
"from the Crown, can have no Weight in the present Case.''' 

Meapk Family. — Mrs. Ellis, niece of General George G. Meade, 
furnished the following record in a recent letter to one of our members. 

Rorkrt Meade, b. in Ireland, d. Phila., Aug., 1754; md. Mary . 

Their children were: 

Garrett, Georoe, and Catherine: the last d. June 20, 1S10; md. 
Nov. 23, 1701, Thomas Fitzsimons, who was b. in Ireland in 1741, 

tf.in Phila., Aug. 20, 1811 (no issue). " 

George Meade son of Kobert Meade, b. Feb. 29, 1741, d. Philada. ] 

Nov. 9, 1808 ; md. May 5, 176$, Henrietta Constantia Worsam, dan. of i 

Hon. Richard Worsam, member of the King's Council for the Island 
of Barbadocs. She was b. in England in 1718, d. Aug. 27, 1S22, bu. in 
Edgeharton, England. Their children were : 
Catherine, b. Feb. 20, 1700, d. Jan. 17, 1700, in London, unmarried. 
Elizabeth, b. Jan. 20, 1770; md. Thomas Ketland, Jr., of Birming- 
ham, England. She d. 1837, in Leamington, England. 
Henrietta Coxstantia, b. Aug. 15, 1772, md. Dec. 22, 179i>, John 
Ketland, of Birmingham, England, d. June 27, 1801. He d. 1801, 

in Philadelphia. -I 

Richard Worsam, b. June 23, 1778, d. June 25, 182S ; md. Jan. i 

1801, Margaret Coats Butler. 
Charlotte, b. Sept. 9, 1781, d. Doc. 25, 1S01 ; md. Oct. 2, 1800, 
William Hustler; left one son Thomas Hustler, of Ackland Hall, 
England, and left issue (see Burke's "Landed Gentry"). f 



.1 



George Meade had four other children, who died young and unmar- 
ried, so that Richard Worsam Meade and Charlotte Hustler are the only 
two leaving i<sue. 

Richard Worsam Meade's children were : 

HENRIETTA, hid. Alexander J. Dallas; no living issue. 

Charlotte Hustler, md. Col. James J). Graham, had issue. Col. 

William M. Graham, Duncan Graham, U.S.N., and Mrs. John G. 

George. 
Elizabeth, md. Alfred Ingrabam, and had issue, three sons, Francis, 

Edward, Thos. Pockhill, ami Mrs. Maury, Mrs. Branson, Mrs. 

Ellis, Mrs. Lyman. 
RICHARD W., U.S.X., md. Clara F. Meigs, and had issue, Admiral P. 

W. Meade, Robert Meade, Mr,. Sands, Mrs. Clara Meade. 
Maria, md. Gen. Hartiuan Bache, and had issue. Mrs. Albert Bache, 

R. Meade Bache, and Henrietta Boric, who left son Hart man. 

l Dr. Cadualader Krai*. 



.; 



Notes and Queries. 243 



SalVadora, uiff. V 1 Thomas McLaughlin, U.S.X. ; 2 d . Judge Peter- 
son, issue : Mrs. Van Wyck, Mrs. Canell, Kmily Patcrson, 
Gen. Geokge G. Meade, mil. Margaretta Sergeant and had issue, 
John Serjeant Meade, Col. George Meade, Margaret Butler Meade, 
Spencer Meade, Sarah Wise Meade {mrt. John 15. -Largo), Henrietta 
Meade, William- -Meade. 
Maria mine, uid. Capt. Thomas linger of South Carolina, and had 
issue, Thomas, Chapman, Charlotte (Mrs. Parker), Mrs. Lalitte, 
Mrs. Prioleaa. 
I find that Elizabeth Meade married Thomas Xctland in 1790 ; he re- 
turned to England about 1811 ; he died some years be lore his wire at 
Ackland Hall, the seat of the Hustlers ; she died at Leamington, Eng- 
land. General Meade's son George might have known more about the 
Ketlands, but I believe he said very little was known of them except that 
two of them married Meades and left no children. 

Letter of Major Thomas Proctor to the Council of Safety 
in Philadelphia, 1776. — 

"I have ordered all the regular soldiers that were taken Prisoners and 
enter' d with me to be taken to Goal as I fear'd future Consequences 
that might attend their staying at this place hi case of an Invasion 
believing from what I have seen, and heard, that Correspondence 
is held up between L d How, and them, by means of M rs White wife of 
one [of] ray People. I have given Cap' Courtnay orders to seize her 
and her papers and Commit her to Confinement till you are pleas' 1 to 
hear the matter alledged against her. 

"I hope the Councill will pardon my Inadvertancy in first Inlisting 
them, as l shall forbid myself such pleasure as [1] Expected to have 
had from their services, in future. 

"Two flatts is lmediately wanted to Carry stone from here to die piers 
as there is little security for the Chain and Trunk being Quite open 
without they are Covered with stone also more men if Possible to be 
bad. v 
n Fort Island Dec sth " YotliB most respectfully, 

"1776 "Tno s Proctor." 

Letter of Colonel Alexander Hamilton, of Washington's 
Staff, to Colonel Pickering, Q. M. G. — 

"D* Sir, 

"The General has anticipated the Subject of your letter of this day, 
by ordering the greater part of the Jersey troops to Morris Town to 
occupy the huts there. 

"He nevertheless continues in the desire that that place may not be 
the depositary of any large quantity of stores. 

"The situation of the two artificers can only be pitied not redressed. 
The families of men in the service cannot be the object of military pro- 
vision, and it will be impossible to discriminate. This is the General's 
sentiment and has governed in all former applications of the same kind. 
" Sincerely I) r Sir y r Qbed Ser\\ 

"A. Hamilton 

"H'» Q" Fcby-9-Sl. "Aide l>e Camp" 



244 



Notes and Queries. 



LiMIiKiCK [Montgomery County, Pennsylvania] Church Lottery 
Ticket. — 



No. 3241. Limerick Church Lottery 



(Authorised by Law. J 



B 



THIS ticket will entitle the bearer to such prize as 
may be drawn to its number, if demanded within 
one year after drawing. 

OWEN EVANS Commiss'r. 
Limerick, Jan. 24th, 1810. 



The Van Wickle Memorial Libbaky, Lafayette College, 
Eastox, Pexnsylvama. — By the will of Augustus S. Van Wickle, of 
Hazleton, Pennsylvania, who died on June S, 1S0S, Lafayette College 
received a legacy of thirty thousand dollars for the erection of a 
Memorial Library Building, which has been completed. 

It consists of a high basement cellar of buff stone, and a story and a 
half of mottled Pompeiian brick with ornamental terra-cotta trimmings. 
The roof is made of tea-pot brown Spanish tiles. 

Passing through the ample archway of the entrance the visitor finds 
the main section of the building prepared for the reception of the books 
of reference and the general administration of the library. The interior 
is finished in Flemish oak, with prettily- moulded capitals and cornices 
in the plaster, which is frescoed in a warm yellow. On the rijrht and 
left of the entrance are the librarian's room and a coat-room. The large 
east wing is one lofty room frescoed in a light Pompeiian red, and pro- 
vided with steel book-stacks." It is separated from the rest of the build- 
ing by brick walls pierced by a single fire-door, and in so far as pos- 
sible made fire-proof. Tn this room the general library is placed. 

The west wing contains the reading-room. It is finished in Flemish 
oak, with wainscot and panelled ceiling. The walls are a faint orange, 
giving a warm tone to the brightly lighted room without being trying to 
the eyes of readers. 

The second story contains two rooms, on the north and south, which 
will be set apart for special research and the use of the Faculty. The 
other rooms are to be the store-rooms for books, magazines, and other 
things not in immediate use, 

A book-lit! from the [iackinjj-room in the basement pusses through 
the librarian's room to the main stor:ige-ro<>m. A large card-catalogue 
case occupies a prominent place in the vestibule. 

The library will be in charge of Mr. Walter (I. Forsyth, a graduate of 
Harvard University, ami of the New York State Library School. 



Notes and Queries. 245 

Proclamation and Letter or Wikltam Makkfiam, 1G87. — Tlie 

following is a copy of tbe original draft of a letter and proclamation 
relating to the settlement and occupancy of land- in Pennsylvania, in 
the Manuscript Collection of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 

A PROCLAMATION Df THE PROP* DEPUTY. 

Since y e Proprietary had no other thing in his Eye in j* settlement of 
this Province next to y e advancem 1 of vertue y Q y e Comfortable situation 
of y e Inhabitants therein, and for y* End with y c Advice & Consent of 
y c mast Eminent of y e fir.-t purchasers ordained y 1 Even*. Township Con- 
sisting of five thousand acres should have tenu families at y e Le:tst to y e 
End y* y c Province might not lie like a Wilderness as some others yett 
doc by vast vacant tracts of Land but be Regularly Improved for y e 
benifitt of socyety in helpe [of] Trade Education Goverm'. Also Koad3 
Travell Entertainenient iVc. and finding that this single Constitution is y l 
w ch Eminently prefers y e Province in y e Esteem & Choyce of persons 
of great Judgment Ability and Quallity to Embarque with us & second 
our beginnings We do hereby publish & give notice that y e Commis- 
sion will inspect w 1 tracts of Land taken up lie vacant and unseated & 
if any of y* said Tracts Lying vacant and unseated shall not be seated 
according to y* Regulation aforesaid within three months after x* Date 
hereof! provided y e usuall time allowed for seating y e Land be already 
Expired the said Tract will be Disposed off to those that are able and 
Peady to seat y c same. Dated at Philad y e Twenty Sixth Day of y e fifth 
month in y e third year of y e Reigne of King James y e Second Sc Sev- 
enth off y e Proprietary^ Goverment anoque Dom 1GS7. 

W tt Mark ham 
Jo n Goodson 

Two of these were sett up in Philadelphia y* 27 of y e 5 th 1(>S7 one 
was sent in a letter to y e Sheriff of Chester County an other to James 
Harrison of y* same date both Letters being Dated v c 2S th 5 month 
1G87. 

flriends J C. K T. W S. J G. P, W. D P. J C. I S. all and Every one 
ofy- 

1 thought my selfe obliged to send you y* Inclosed \\ rh is a Coppv of a 
Proclamation ft'rom y e Gover r and Request not only y c Reading it in y* open 
Court and to Consult amongst yo r selves of some Course tl'or y c accom- 
plishing what therein is, but also that Each of you when separated may 
use that Authority the Proprietary Gov* hath inrestetl you with to {Fur- 
ther and Carry on his Will ami pleasure therein Expresses! so far forth 
as yoi are Concerned. J\\ this i am y* more KriK-st and Pressing 
because I have observed a gnat backwardness in people in yeilding 
obedience to his just and Law full Commands, So not doubting any one 
of yo T Ready Compliances herein, I remaine 

. Yo r llaithfull 

ye 4th of j-efithmo uru " ! xr 

lto7 >\ n ' Markiiam. 

Dr. John Ai»oi.rn MEYER, who for ten days relieved the Surgcom 
in charge of the Continental Hospital at Lit it/, Lauc:c-ter Count?, 
Pennsylvania, in 177S, ivas born Marvh 15, 1711, in Saximv, GcrmauV. 



24G Notes and Queries. 

9 

}fe was licensed to practise in August of 17?2, and in 17-12 came to 
Pennsylvania, where lie continued his profession in Bocks and Lancaster 
Counties, to a lev/ years prior to his death at Lititz, on October G, 1781. 
He \viw married in Philadelphia, in 1745, to Ju>tina Kraft. 

Oi'K Fkexch Allied. — 

Rece d 2G Aug' 1779 of T. Matlack one hundred Dollars for the Band 
of Music on the 23 rJ celebrating the birth day of Lewis loth. . 

St. Fokkage. 

Rec rt Sept. 2nd, 1770 of Timothy Matlack the sum of four hundred 
pounds for the fire works on the birth day of the King of France. £400. 

Jean Laugeky. 

Reec* Sept. 25. 1779 of Timothy Matlack, one hundred and twenty 
dollars for ringing the bells on the entering of the Minister of France 
into this city. 

120 Dol"" 

Joseph Dolby. 

• 
Petition of some Inhabitants of Lancaster County, Penn- 
sylvania, December, 1777, praying that the whole strength of the 
State might be called into active service. — 

To the honorable, the General Assembly of Ee present atives 
of the State of Pennsylvania. 

Gentlemen, 

We have with the highest concern, as well as wonder, looked on, while 
an Army of about Ten Thousand Men have taken from the Continent, 
the Capital of this State: and have seated themselves down in the (all- 
most) quiet possession thereoif. 

And our breasts allready antissipate those scenes of "Wo and Desola- 
tion which must be the probable consequences of next summers Cam- 
pain, in case the Enemy now here should not onely remain unsubdued, 
but be made strong by large Reinforcements. 

For a time we hoped that before the cud of the Campain, some good 
improvement would have been made of our great Successes at the North- 
ward; which put it in the power of the Continent to turn their united 
force against the remaining Army of the Fnemy. When this hope failed : 
We then looked forward to that Season, wherein, it is expected, the 
Enemy, with a large part of their Fleet, will be shut up in the heart of 
our Country: and llatteredourselvesth.it some effectual blow would then 
be struck. That Reason now draws near — and we see no preparation 
makeing for that purpose; which constrains us to speak out; and look 
up to you Sirs, as the Guardians of our devoted State. 

And Gentlemen, What we devoutly wish for, and pray you to consider 
oft'; is, that the must Immediate and effectual measures be taken, to call 
forth (as near as possible) the whole strength of this, and the neighbor- 
ing States, against our Fnemys: and especially to. improve the favour" 
able opportunity which Nature, or rather the < .Jod of nature, may auord, 
while the Schuylkill is froze, and the navigation of Dele ware ob.-tructed ; 



Nofcs and Queries. 



24' 



to make the most vigorous efforts, to destroy or get into cur hands, both 
the Army and Fleet of our Encmys. 

This, in our opinion, is an Event, »t once rfo practicable, so great in 
itself, so happy and Glorious in inconsequences, and at the same time, 
so much danger in the neglecting of it; as to be highly worthy of the 
most immediate and vigorous pursuits even in the face ot all the inclera- 
eney of the Beasoh, and every other difficulty whirl] stands in the way. 

Should this appear eligabie to the honorable House, their Wisdom 
will determine what steps are regular, in order to set it on foot in gen- 
eral : and carry it into executiou in 'heir own Provence in particular. 

Praying that he who is infinite in Wisdom may preside in your Coun- 
sils; and in this trying Crisis, direct you to such measures as he will 
own and succeed. \\"e remain, with all due Respects, your dutifull 

and anxious Petitioners — 



John Smith 
John Cuthbertson 
James Kenncy 
Matthew McClung 
James Cooper 
Christian Wirtz 
W. Montgomery 
John Woods 
Jamc3 Woods 
John Woods, J r 
John Scott 
Sam 1 Turbett 
W m Hamilton 
Geo. Ross 
Fred. Lauman 
Geo. Koss, J r 
Henry Shtymafcer 
John Wood hull 
Stewart Herbert 
James Crawford 
James Mercer 
Stewart Herbert, J' 



Will 01 Skiies 
R* Cunningham 
John Bresler (?) 
Matthias Shiymaker 
James Scott 
Henry Fultz 
John Rowland 
Rich d Woods 
John Craig 
Casper Singer 
William Henry 
Christopher Marshall 
Bcdj u Harbeson 
Dorington Wilson 
Joseph Park 
Rob 1 Thompson 
George Graham 
W m Ross 
Tho 5 Cuthbert 
Robert Taggarl 
Jedidiah Snowden 
Fred Phil e 



Letter or Isaac Griffith to his Wife, 1777.— The writer of 
the following letter was born in Kent County, Delaware, lie enlisted, 
January, 177G, in Col. Haslet's Regiment, for one year. At the expi- 
ration of this term of service, he re-enlisted in Kirk wood's Battalion, 
Delaware Line, for the war. After independence was established, he 
moved to the western part of Pennsylvania, and served in Congress as 
Representative from Fayette County, i$ll-13. He married Mary Morris, 
a descendant of Anthony Morris, the second Mayor of Philadelphia. 



MOKRISToWN, Fob. 1, 1777. 

My Dear Wife— 

I cannot neglect the opportunity of informing you where I am, and 
likewise concerning my health. We arrived at Morristqwn Sundav 

evening, Jan. 2<Ith, after a most fatiguing March and have remained 
here since. Our time is now out and our people are returning home. 1 



I 



248 Nates and Queries. 

shall stay a few days longer with Penny Hazen who is extremely bad, 
and has been sick about a week. Notwithstanding the desire I hare 
to come home and see my dear little girls, I could not leave Ilazen so 
far from home, at the point of death, without friends or relatives. As 
soon as he is able to travel we shall proceed homeward. 

We have very little news at Headquarters. To-day was iieard a very 
heavy firing toward Prutiswick, but we have no particulars. Our Militia 
gets no honour by this tramp. The General was very angry at their 
going home without rendering any benefit to the Colonies. I have been 
very hearty since I left home — have sometimes a little of the Sciataka 
and quickstep, as we call it here, but nothing to hurt me. 

I shall conclude by wishing you all manner of health and happiness 
until my return, which I hope will be shortly. Remember me to all 
enquiring friends and accept my love. 

from your Husband, 

Isaac Griffith. 

To Polly Griffith. 

"Our Militia," wliich Isaac Griffith mentions in this letter, was 
undoubtedly Colonel Collins' Battalion, concerning which Washington 
wrote to its Colonel, under date of January 21, 17 77. 

"Sir: 

"To my great surprise I was applied to this morning to discharge 

your Battalion What service have they been of? Xone — 

unless marching from home, where they had nothing to do, and staying 

four weeks on the way can be called service " — "More Colonial 

Homesteads/' 

We learn from the same source that the militia did remain with 
Washington all winter. It would appear from Isaac Griffith's letter 
that this statement is incorrect. T. II. S. 

French Neutrals in - Philadelphia. — Copied from the original 
manuscript in the Manuscript Collection of the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania. 

To the Honourable the Representatives of the Freemen of the Province 
of Pennsylvania in General Assembly met The Remonstrance of the 
Overseers of the Poor of the City of Philad 9 most Respectfully sheweth 

That in the year 17">G Certain Inhabitants of Xova Scotia Commonly 
called French Xeutralls were sent into this Province, many of Whom, 
through. Ago fsckness & Infirmity are rendered incapable of supporting 
themselves ec Families, during the Winter Season especially 

That your Remonstrants not knowing of any monies appropriated by 
Law for the Relief of the s' 1 Neutrals, did. during your Adjournment, 
take the Liberty of administering to their several necessities in as sparing 
a Manner as possible, with a lull Reliance of being reimbursed out of 
such Monies as your Honourable House may order lor their use, as you 
have heretofore done. 

Your Remonstrants think it their indispensilde Duty, as Overseen of 
the Poor, to lay before you the distresses of sakl People, and [*rav in 
their Behalf that you may order such Relief as in your Wisdom vou 
deem necessary, and tor your Honour's Judgment therein have annexed 
a List of such of said Neutrals as they on a carefull Examination found 
in a Situation demanding Assistance. 



Notes and Queries. 



!49 



An Ace'- of such of the 
Examination Judge Worthy 
Dan 1 Le Blane 



The Widow Aneoin 



Susanna Landry 

wife of Peter Landry 



Margaret Bajo 
Mary Breso 
& Sister 

The Widow Bourg: 

Widow Jveculc & 
Widow Lucy 

Joseph Yincort 

& his Son in Law- 
Ann Brvuld 



James Leeompte 



Widow Landry 

Bruno Trahan & Wife 
& Daughter 



The above are the Neutral 
of maintaining themselves. 



Neutrals as the Overseers on a Carefull 
of Relief 

— has a large family, Wife & 5 Children, 
and when sick stand in need of* assistance. 

— A striking Object of Charity, being very 
weakly with a large Family, one of which 
is foolish. 

has 2 young Children, receives no help 
from her husband, as she cannot tell 
" where he is, being from her some time, 
she is also sickly, 
live in one house, they arc weakly 

__ "Women and without assistance, incapable 
of supporting themselves during the 
Winter Season. 

an Industrious yet sickly Woman, fre- 
quently requires assistance. 

_ during the Winter Season stand in need 
of help, 
both live in one house, their Families 

_ are very Large, one almost Blind, & in 
the opinion of the Overseers very help- 
less, and deserving of Relief. 

— a Woman who acts as Schoolmistress to 
the Children and on that acet. in need of 
assistance, as she cannot work fur a live- 
lihood her whole time being taken up in 
the Care of them. 

— a man very low & "Weak & seemingly 
in a Consumption, unable to earn a mil 
maintenance. 

— Old infirm & Blind, in consequence 
unable in any respect to earn a living, 
has a Grown Son an Ideot, Old al?o & 

— Infirm & in most respects true objects 
of Charity. 

s which want help, the others being capable 



Account of the Number & Situation of the Frexch Nectiux 
Familys Now in this City. 

Joseph Laboue & Wife 

Widow Burke has two daughters 

James 1/ Count Taylor, has his Mother in LawtoSupport ) 

who is Blind, himself his Wife & daughter are all sick f 
Ann Besvau ) t „ . _ ; fc , 

Kalherinc Woodrow J > 0Un S ^ eoiucn *«<> *-*?« together 2d« 
Peter Vansin, had a Wife & four Children, one Child is 

Blind G d° 



2 in family 

3d 



250 Kates and Queries. 



Twenty two Family* • 78 Individual 

Philadelphia 2' 1 Novemb r '1771. 

The above account was taken in Consequence of an Order of the Board 
of Overseers of the Poor Ky 

John Piullirs 
James Reed 

British Protection given to George Hesse, Pennington, 
New Jersey, 1776. — 



:=TT 



! 1 

> . 



Joseph Ribbau Image Milker a Wife & 3 Children 5 d° 

Widow Backward, has 4 Daughters & 1 Son, daughters all 

Sickly 6 d° 

Widow Mullowny Burke has 2 daughters 3 d° 

Margaret Besyau ] . 4 

Pose Bressau I young Weomeu who Live together 3 d° 

Susanna' Daurong ) 
Widow Laundree, has 2 daughters & 1 son (one Daughter 

is Foolish) 4d° f ... 

Simon Babin, has a Wife & 1 Child ; lie received a hurt "} 

in his side Sometime ago Which often Benders him I 3d 

Unable to Work, (his Child is sick) ' J 

Daniel Letzlon, has a Wife & 5 Children 7 d° 

Charles Minyau, has a Wife & 3 Children . 5 d° 

Charles Strahan, has a Wife & 1 Child born foolish 3 d G '.J 

Joseph Welcomh, has a Wife 2 d° . vi 

Peter Savoy, has' a %Vife 2 d° I .; 

Placid Laundree has a Wife, who is Mostly Sick . 2 d° 

Widow White has 3 Children 4 d° 

Charles Laundree, has a Wife 2 d° 

Francis Backward has a Wife Sc 1 Child 3 d° 

John Brow has 3 Children, (he has been Sick a Long time) 4 d° . j j 

Susanna Laundree has 2 daughters 3 d° 



; 

9 

i 
ri 

Pennington loth Deem 1776. A^ 

It's his Kxcellencys Lieut. Gon x Earl Cornwallis his orders that no \l 

person presume to molest or Injure the property of George Jlesse. ' I : 

By Iiis Excellencvs orders. 

J. Tinker 
Aid de Camp. 



Bequest and Gifts or the Late Mrs. Esther F. Wistar to 
the Historical Society ov Pennsylvania. — The executors of the t 

will of the late Mrs. Esther F. Wistar, widow of Dr. Mifflin Wistar, of 
this city, have notified the Historical Society of the following bequest: 

. "Item. I give and bequeath unto the Historical Society of Penn- 
sylvania, the sum of Five thousand dollars: 1 also bequeatn unto the 
said Historical Society of Pennsylvania, in the name of my dear husband 
Dr. MitUin Wistar, four portraits, viz: One of the Abbe Correa da Serra, 
(the distinguished botanist \vho named the plant called ' Wistaria ' in 
honor of my dear husband's father), which wm painted byPeale; an- 
other of Governor Millliu and his wife Sarah Morris, which was painted 






i 



." 



Notes and Queries. 251 

by Copley, and presented to my beloved husband by Susanna Morris, 
the sister of his wife — Governor Mifllin being a great uncle of my hus- 
band ; and the others of my husband's parents painted by Waugb. . . ." 
[The portraits are on exhibition in the "Jordan Annex" of the His- 
torical Society.] 

Mrs. Wistar also left a memorandum of instructions to her executors, 
directing that the following articles be given to the Historical .Society: 
"Portugal Illustrated in a Series of Letters." By Pew W. M. Kinsey, 
B.D., London, 1S29, containing an account of the Abbe Correa da 
Serra ; and his letter of condolence (framed) to Mrs. Caspar Wistar on 
the death of her husband ; also, marriage certificates of Dr. Mifflin 
Wistar and Esther Fisher Smith; Dr. Casper Wistar and Elizabeth 
Mifllin ; and Thomas Miffiin and Sarah Morris. 

The above gifts have also been received. 

Letter of Lieutenant- Colonel Leven Powell of the Virginia 
Continental Line, to General Washington, 177S. — 

May it please your Excellency, 

If I could be persuaded that the Service really required my stay in 
the army, the application for leave to resign the commission you were 
pleased to honor me with, would be exceedingly painful to me, but when 
I consider the peculiar Situation of the Service in which I am placed, I 
am lead to conclude that such an application will not be disagreeable, 
& to a person under my particular circumstances, hope will not be 
denied. I shall beg leave to mention one reason which is considered 
as sufficient by many at any rate to Justifie the step. 

Hank in the army is a matter which is universally agreed cannot be 
given up with honor. The vacancys in the other lines being filled up, 
that of Virginia alone places four Gentlemen over me whom 1 com- 
manded last-November, nor can it be otherwise except there was the same 
means to fill up our Regim* as in the others. It' notwithstanding it 
could be your Excellency's wish for me to continue- in the army, that 
consideration should be got over provided my state of Health would 
admit of it. It has been my misfortune that hitherto, I have not been 
able to render my country any or but very little Service, and not having 
yet recovered the last winter's illness, I must own myself atfraid to 
make another tryal. The probability of my being able to stand it, I 
think by no means equal to the risque of becoming an incumbrance not 
only on my country but family. My request therefore is. Sir. that you 
will please to permit me to resign, & believe me to be with all due 
respects, 

Your Excelleneys Ob 1 & 

very Ilble Serv' 

Leven Powell 
2S th Not* 177S. 

Quale*. 

UxiYEKsiTV of Pennsylvania F.uvlty. — Genealogical and bio- 
graphical information is requested of the following Trustee, Hector, 
Provost, and Profe^ors of the College of Philadelphia, now the Univer- 



I 



252 Notes and Queries. 

sky of Pennsylvania : Philip SVng, William Coleman ; Rev. David 
Martin, Rector; John McDowell, Provost ; Professors James Cannon, 
Theophilus Grew, and Rev. Ebenezer Kinnerslev. 

E. J. 

A Tract by Rev. Griffith Hughes. — The Rev. Griffith Hughes, in 
a letter to the " ►Society for Propagating the Gospel," refers to his having 
published a tract in Welsh, while living in Pennsylvania, 1732-56, on 
"Death, Judgement, Heaven and Hell," and that he had distributed 
upward of one hundred and fifty copies gratuitously. Are copies extant? 

O. 

Brooks.. — Information is requested of the family of John Brooks and 
Mary, his wife, who were residing in Southampton Township, Rucks 
County, Pennsylvania, in 1744. 

Wait. 

Iftcplics. 

A Tract by Rev. Griffiths Hughes. — Mr. Hildeburn had not 
met with a copy of this tract when he published "Issues of the Press 
in Pennsylvania," but mentions an advertisement referring to it in Brad- 
ford's Weekly Mercury of August 14, 1735. 



JBooI; IttotiCCS. 

Diary of a German Officer in the Hessian Forces in* the 
America n Revolution. 
The diary of a Hessian officer, Freiherr von Dornberg, who served 
under the British flag in the War for American Independence, has been 
recently printed by Professor Marseille, Head-Master of the Bismarck 
Gymnasium, at Pyritz, in Pommerania, Germany. It is a capital exam- 
ple of the renewed interest in Germany in publishing the records still pre- 
served in ihc families of the ofHcers and men who came from Germany, 
by order of their Princes, to take the English side in the American 
Revolutionary War. Eelking, both in his history of the " German 
Allied Troops in America" and in his "Life of Rietlcsel," drew largely 
from the public records and from family 'papers. Bancroft, and Lowell, 
and Kapp fathered much original material from these and other sources, 
and quite a number of journals and diaries have been translated and 
printed by Stone, and Bierstadt, and others. In the pages of the 
"Pennsylvania Magazine of History" there have been some contribu- 
tions of the same kind. In Germany quite a sharp fillip was given to 
the subject by the claim made by the present Emperor for a share of 
honors won by German soldiers in America. Colonel Von Werthern 
printed a lecture to his regiment, one of those that had served here, 
in which he urged, the families of those who had left diaries and 
letters written during their American campaigns to print them. It was 
the heads ol' the present families of Knyphausen and Lossberj: that fur- 
nished their portraits, tor the first time reproduced by the Historical 
Society of Pennsylvania in the "Pennsylvania Magazine of History." 
Professor Marseille found a diary of young I><".rn!vrg who had served 
here, in possession of his descendant, and he ha- printed it with quite 



Xotcs and Queries. § 253 

an array of notes, historical and biographical, enhancing its value and 
interest. He points out the contempt expressed by Frederick the Great 
for the zeal with which the potty German prince* sold their troops to 
Great Britain to take part in a war which, as he said, was none of their 
business. He quotes the sharp criticism oi' Lessir.g and Schiller lor 
such an abuse of the power of the Brunswick, and Hessian, and Anhalt, 
and Bayreuth rulers to dispose of their soldiers, and to increase their 
own incomes at the expense of the lives of their unfortunate subjects. 

He points out, however, the lessons learned in America and applied 
by Bwald and other German officers in showing Germany how to con- 
duct its long war againt Napoleon to a successful issue. Of the seventeen 
thousand men sent here by the Elector of' Hesse, at least six thousand 
five hundred never saw their homes again, many of them became good 
American citizens, and all of them brought home the advantages of 
emigration to the new world, and thus helped to give it one of the best 
elements of its population. 

Dornbcrg belonged to a family that traced its origin back to the year 
100G, and had supplied many good soldiers and civil officers ; he, him- 
self, afterwards became Hessian Minister in London, and died in Cassel 
in IS! 9, full of years and honors. Enough of a scholar to cite Horace, 
and enough of an artist to make sketches that were eagerly seized by 
both English and German comrades, it is characteristic that Ids diary 
and his letters home were mainly written in French, for that was the 
court language of the time. Beginning with the gathering of the 
regiment on March 2S, 1779, he gives a brief account ot^ its successive 
movements, of his voyage, of the daily rations on board ship, peas and 
pork, butter, cheese, meat, meal ; of the piety of the soldiers, with 
their little pocket Bibles and prayer-books, and of their arrival in New 
York harbor on September 23. In December he took part in the 
expedition to the south, under Sir Henry Clinton, well liked by the 
Germans for his services in the Seven Years' War, and his knowledge 
of Germany, its people and their language. The voyage was almost 
as trying as that across the ocean, but the novelty of the country around 
Charleston- and Savannah, and the hard work of the siege operations 
gave him and his comrades plenty of employment. The condition of 
the slaves awoke the sympathy of the young German, and the wealth 
of the country made him regret the ravages of war. He breaks out in 
anger at the news that the ollicci> who have served at the risk of Hie 
and health are passed over to give promotion to court favorites at home, 
and that the rank and tile are but a mas- of rags?, justifying the reproach 
that the Hessian soldiers were a U>t of vagabonds, for otherwise their 
prince would not have sold them like sheep. 

He contracts the English clothed and equipped to suit the country 
and the kind. of service they were forced to undertake, and his poor 
Germans neglected and left without care from home. He describes in 
detail the hardships, and discomfort.-, and privation-., and losses during 
the protract, d siege of Charleston, paying tribute to the >kill of the 
English engineers, the energy of the English fleet, admiral and sailors 
alike showing characteristic courage ami ability, and the success of 
Tarleton's Light Horse against L*ulaskt'a Legion in the buttle in which 
its leader fell and Colonel W'a.-hingtou and many others were captured. 
He repeats Ewaid's report of the praise of the English officers tor the 
excellence of his own Hessian Grenadiers in the trenches. He describes 



254 Notes end Queries. 

his interview with the chief of some Indian allies, and has little praise 
for them. Finally he reports the surrender of Charleston by General 
Lincoln, and the entry of the city so long and. so gallantly defended 
against large odds of land forces and the strong British fleet. He finds 
many evidences of elegance characteristic of Charleston, and describes 
its curious population of native families Of wealth, of Germans, among 
them many Jews, all traders, and of negroes. The forces, of which 
Dornberg was an officer, re-embarked and reached New York again ; 
there he reports on July 22, 17-SO, that he had been appointed an aid 
of General Knyphausen, with whom he served until the end of the war 
in America. 

One of the notes to ■ Dornberg' s diary holds out the promise of the. 
early publication of a series of valuable letters from Captain Greilly 
of the Hessian forces, dealing particularly with Donop's misfortunes at 
Red Bank. Professor Marseille does not tell us where he found them, 
but it is very satisfactory thus to have an intelligent German of our own 
day diligently adding to our slender stock of material for a better knowl- 
edge of the part taken by the German ofneers and soldiers in their cam- 
„ paigns in this country. Professor Marseille has set a capital example 
that may well be commended to others who have access to other such 
family records. 

In a paper recently read before the American Philosophical Society 
and printed in its proceedings, there is a very full account of the wealth 
of on printed material relating to the American War of Independence, 
in the German archives and in private hands. Every addition from 
these sources is heartily welcomed. The large collection made by the 
historian Bancroft, is now freely accessible to students in the Lenox 
Branch of the New York Public Library, and from it some valuable 
papers have been contributed to print. Mr. Lowell's valuable material 
for his capital book, "The Hessians in America," is still in possession of 
his family ; it is to be hoped that it may yet be placed in one of the 
great libraries in Boston as his best memorial. 

General Stryker's exhaustive "History of the Battle of Trenton," 
derives much of its value from the large number of original papers re- 
lating to that event which he procured from the German archives. 
Much yet remains there, and it would be a great advantage if there 
could be made descriptive catalogues of such of their contents as relate 
to American affairs, for they contain a mass of un printed reports, letters, 
etc., written by the German officers during their service here. It would 
not be a very expensive thing to do, and an appeal from the Historical 
Societies of this country, supported by our Ambassador in Berlin, 
would no doubt secure the necessary authorization to enable some of the 
able men engaged in these archives thus to supply a wholly now array 
of original documents. 

The intelligent zeal of Professor Marseille has put in print, and there- 
fore accessible to students, thi< hitherto unknown diary of Captain 
Dornberg, and no doubt other families in Germany in possession of 
Similar interesting diaries and letters written during the campaigns in 
America, will now be ready to make them public. Indeed it might be 
well to ask the German Government to do what the French Government 
did through the publication of Doniol's splendid series of volumes, 
containing all the official papers in the French War uud £tate Oiliees, 
relating to the relations of France and America during the American 



Notes and Qua 



ncs. 



War of Independence, a lasting monument of the great help rendered 
bv France to the establishment of this Republic. 

J. G. R. 

The South Carolina Historical a>*d Genealogical Magazine. 
Published Quarterly by the South Carolina Historical Society. 
Charleston. Vol. I., No. 1., pp. LIS, Svo. 

We extend our greetings and best wishes to this new quarterly, which 
is attractive typographically and filled with valuable historical and 
genealogical matter. "The Mission of Colonel John Laurens to Europe 
in 1781," and "Papers of the First Council of Safety of the Revolu- 
tionary Party in South Carolina, June-November, 1775," will especially 
claim the attention of historians. The genealogical contribution, "The 
Bull Family' of South Carolina," compiled by Langdon Cheves, Esq., is 
enriched with valuable annotations by the editor. 

The membership fee in the Society is $3.00 per annum, which includes 
the Magazine ; to non-members the price of the Quarterly is §1.00 per 
number. Mr. A. S. Salley, Jr., the editor, is also secretary and treas- 
urer of the Society, to whom all communications should be addressed. 

Historical Sketches. A Collection of Tapers prepared for 
the Historical Society or Montgomery County, Pennsyl- 
vania. Norristown, Pennsylvania, 1000. Svo, pp. 3S6*. 
The Montgomery County Historical Society is probably the most 
active and enterprising of all our local societies. It owns the building 
in which its valuable library and collection are deposited, and live years 
ago published its first volume of local historical papers and sketches. 
So cordial and substantial a reception was given to this volume, that the 
Society was encouraged to issue this second volume. It has also inaugu- 
rated the marking of important historical places within the limits of the 
county, and has erected memorial stones at Barren Hill, indicating the 
location of Lafayette's camp there in May of 177S, v.nd near Penny- 
packer's Mills, on the Perkiomen Creek, to commemorate the encamp- 
ment of the Continental Army there in 1777. Among the valuable 
historical papers contributed to the volume under notice are the "Battle 
of the Crooked Billet," by General \V. W. H. Davis ; "Washington at 
Pennypacker's Mills," by lion. II. \\\ Knit/.; " Washington's Head- 
quarters at Whitpain," by Dr. Morris J. Lewis; " Fort Washington's 
Historic Environs," by C. S. Maun; "The Battle of Edge Hill," by 
\Y. J. Buck ; " Lafayette's Retreat from barren Hill," bv Levi Streeper*; 
"Lafayette at Barren Hill," by Irvin C. Williams ; and" "Valley Forge 
Camp," by Kllwood Huberts. The work is well printed and bound, and 
illustrated by upward of thirty portraits, old 1 tliltKngx, and maps. 
Price, $2.00, postpaid. Address Joseph Fornanec, Esq., Norristown, 
Pennsylvania. 

The North Carolina Historical and Genealogical Register. 

The first number of this quarterly, which enters upon a comparatively 
Dew and undeveloped Held, contains abstracts of the public record* iii 
the oiiice of the Secretary of State at Kahigb. comprising Land Grants 
for Chowan County ; Wills probated prior t<» l7''.o ; Cuilvevahces, Court 
Records beginninjr in 1(>70, and other valuable data. It is an octavo 
of 100 pages, neatly printed, and the terms of euhscription s.'J.oO per 



256 Notes and Queries. 

annum. Address the editor, J. It. B. Hathaway, Kdenton, North 
Carolina. 

The Storming of Stony Point on the Hudson, Midnight, July 
15, 1779. Irs Importance in the Light of Unpublished 
Documents. Bv Henry P. Johnston, A.M. New York: James 
T. White & Co., *lf'00. Pp. 231. 
Tlie storming and capture of Stony Point by the gallant and magnetic 
Wayne, of Pennsylvania, and his famous Corps of Light Infantry, has 
often been written about in history and story, but in the work under 
notice we are given by i';ir the fullest and most interesting account of that 
brilliant historic event that lias been published. In the campaign of 
1779, Sir Henry Clinton strove to ' handle "Mr. Washington" by 
enticing him from his stronghold at West Point, but failed, and the 
American Commander-in-Chief determined to achieve some needed in- 
spiriting success like that at Trenton, and selected Stony Point for the 
enterprise. It proved a success ; Tryon's raiders were recalled, New 
Jersey was spared, and the campaign closed in midsummer, for Clinton's 
operations had been paralyzed, and the prestige of the American soldier 
gained immensely. Professor Johnston's previous contributions to our 
Revolutionary history, particularly in the vicinity of the City of New 
York and along the Hudson, in which the troops from Pennsylvania 
bore a creditable part, prepared us to expect the present exhaustive 
work on Stony Point, but we are more than gratified at the richness of 
the new material his researches have developed. Among the fifty-six 
documents made public are two hitherto unpublished letters from Wash- 
ington ; four from Sir Henry Clinton, the British commander ; two from 
Lord George Gcrmaine, in charge of the War Office, London (one of 
which contains the king's regrets and alarm at the capture of Stony Point) ; 
oue from the British Peace Commissioner, William Eden ; and over 
twenty-live others from Generals Heath, McDousrall, and George Clinton ; 
Colonels Febigcr, Scammell, and Putnam, and Lieutenant John Gibbon, 
of the forlorn hope. The remaining documents have been utilized in a 
few instances by other historians. The illustrations and authentic maps 
are valuable and of historical interest, and were prepared specially for 
this work. The photogravure of Wayne is much to be commended. 
Every library and school in this commonwealth should possess a copy 
of this excellent and valuable work. 

The First Moravian Missionary Society in America. By Eight 
Reverend J. M. Levering. Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, 1S00. Svo, 

1 his venerable missionary society, organized in the year 1745, stands 
first in the history of religious activity in the American Colonies, because 
all other missionary etforts prior to that date were undertaken only by 
societies in Europe. The reverend gentleman presents many interesting 
details of the lir>t fifty year.- of it> history, during which period it not 
only aided in the foreign mission work of the church, but &up|torted a 
domestic mission in nine of the thirteen colonies. The monograph, with 
the proceeding.- of ' the ■ annual meetiivj, constitution and by-laws, 
officers, and li>t of. members, comprises Tart V., of Volume Y., Trans- 
actions of the Moravian Historical Society, which is completed. 



-TTT? 



._' • ..-. 









• ■ - y • 

u- - * 



t 



£K 






;--. 












.■"7. '-<*Vv : .'-v;^ 



MARGARET SHITPtN. 

From tlic original pencil sketch l>\ M.\i- r Juhn Amlrr, in ihe i* 
of Edward Shippcn, V.^\.. l'hiUdet»RM 



.^•.,1.111 






l.3m«« -oi*. * «. ' —i '-' i V . i t* .<■ • - V 






THE 

PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE 

or 

HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 



Vol. XXIV. 1900. No. 3. 



LIFE OF MARGAEET SHIPPEN, WIFE OF BENEDICT 

ARNOLD. 

BY LEWIS BUKD WALKER. 
SOME OF THE SHIFPEXS. 

We shall not imitate that account of the Washington 
genealogy which carries George Washington's ancestral line 
back to Odin, nor adopt Lord Chesterfield's plan, and assert 
that this family is descended from Adam Shippen and Eve 
Shippen. Consequently, though Edward Shippen, of Lan- 
caster, has written that he was informed that his ancestors 
held possession of a certain copyhold estate in England for 
five hundred years, and though one of the Flemish Ship- 
pens is mentioned as being a vice-chancellor of Charles the 
Fifth of Spain about 1530, we will not attempt to grope 
among these traditions ^ the past, but will simply ask the 
reader's indulgence to accept as a fact the statement that 
there lived in Yorkshire, in England, in the beginning of 
the seventeenth century, a gentleman of good family, 
William Shippen by name. 

A son of this William Shippen, named Edward (born in 
1639), came to Boston in 1GG8, and, after undergoing perse- 
VoL. XXXV. — 17 ( 257 ) 



- 



258 Life of Margaret Slop pen, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

cution as a Quaker, removed to Philadelphia about 1G04. He 
was then considered worth more than ten thousand pounds 
sterling, and almost immediately became a prominent man in 
Pennsylvania, being chosen as speaker of the .Assembly on 
July 9, 1 605. He was named mayor of Philadelphia by Wil- 
liam Penn in the charter of October 25, 1701, was president 
of the Provincial Council, and as such was acting governor of 
Pennsylvania for a period of about ?.a\'Qn months in 1703. 
He surpassed his contemporaries in the style and grandeur 
of his eclitiee and . . . located himself in that venerable 
building afterwards called :i The Governor's House," . . . 
in South Second Street. Its site was then on the hill near 
the town. There he had his great and famous orchard. 
In the lawn before the house, descending to the Dock 
Creek, reposed his herd of tranquil deer. He had the big- 
gest person, the biggest house, and the biggest coach in the 
province, and his property stretched, unbroken, from Six- 
teenth Street to the Delaware Eiver. 

Among the entries made in his Bible by Edward Ship- 
pen's son, Joseph (born in Boston, 1078-9), he states : " My 
relations in England are my Uncle William Shippen's (son 
of the first "William Shippen) children: 

"1. Egbert Shippen, Doctor of Divinity. 

"2. William Shippen, Doctor of Laws & a Parliament 
man. 

" 3. Edwakd Shippen, a Physician. 

" 4. Jonx Shippen, a Spanish merchant. " 

A few sentences culled from various works will show 
what sort of a Parliament man William Shippen was in the 
reign of King George, and the simple statement of the tacts 
is his best eulogy both as a patriot and as a man : 

"Mr. Shippen in the course of the debate said the second paragraph 
of the King's speech seemed rather to be calculated for the meridian of 
Germany than for Great Britain ; and it was a great misfortune that the 
king was a stranger to our language and constitution. Mr. Lcchmere 
afhrmed this was a* scandalous invective against the king's person and 
government, and moved that he who uttered it should he sent to the 



^^^^^^™»i^^»p*pp"f""p 



Life of Margaret SMppm,\V\fc of Benedict Arnold. 259 

Tower. Mr. Shippen refusing to retract or exfusc what ho had said, 
was voted to the Tower by a great majority. "^Smollett s " IliAory'of 
England," Chap. II, George I. 

"Shippen upbraided Walpole terribly in the Debate. . . . He spoke 
long and very well — the better for being in the Right." — " Diary of Lady 
Cowper," 160; May 5; 1720. 

"Some are corrupt" Sir Robert Walpole said ; "but I will tell you 
of one who is not ; Shippen is not." — " Wnlpoliam" I. 3S. 

"The Prince of Wales, to justify his satisfaction with a speech which 
the sturdy old Jacobite had made, sent him £1.000. by General Churchill, 
Groom to his Bedchamber. Shippen refused it."*** u - Century of Anec- 
dote; 1 111, "Chandos Classic*." 

"Mr. Shippen was calm, intrepid, shrewd, and sarcastic." — Smollett's 
"History of England" Chap. II. , George II. 

Pope says : 

"I love to pour out all myself, as plain 
As downright Shippen, or as old Montaigne ; 
In them, as certain to be loved as seen, 
The soul stood forth, nor kept a thought within." 

Upon his silver cup, weighing over thirteen pounds, was 
inscribed, "A Legacy from the Duke of Buckingham &■ 
Normandy to the worthy Mr. Shippen." 

Joseph Shippen was associated with Dr. Franklin in 
founding a society called the "Junto." Among his chil- 
dren who arrived at maturity were : 

Edward Shippen, of Lancaster; 
N Dp. "William Shippen, the elder, a member of Congress in 
1778; 

Anne Shippen, married to Charles Willing. 

As but few memorials of Joseph Shippen are known, we 
give the following letter to his wife, Abigail (Grosse), who 
was visiting relatives in Boston, which will also serve to 
show the epistolary style in that day : 

"PHiL.\n*xrHiA. June 5th, 1711. 
"My Dear: 

"These arc tolctth.ee know that I got well home, and that 1 found the 

Children all well, Betty would not Stay at her Sister Ship pens but went 

to her Grand Mother?, where Slice and Neddy is, and both well pleased 

Considering their Condition, wanting their Mother, hut as fur Jo, though 



mm 



2G0 Life of Margaret Ship pen , Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

Father and Mother both Dune downe to fetch him, he was resolved not 
quit his possession of the house ; as for Sister Shippen when She Came 
for him he fought her fairly and Could not get him along : he is my bed- 
fellow, as for Xanny, She is full fatfc and verry well used : as for Boston 
I have not seen his face since I came home, which Is Six dayes, but I 
hear he Is near Cant. Finnyes, I verry much want him. Mary Trent 
has got a hove with as little warning as thou used to have, She took but 
half an hours time to Consider of it. 

"Sister Murray has given me orders to put a bill on the house she lives 
in. all the Endeavours that Could be used, Could not get Jo to the 
Taylors till Just before I came home. Mol Got him up to Margrets to be 
taken measure of. I know no body that will set a Stich for the Children ; 
neither do I know what thou will want to have done ; I heard thee talk 
of Frocks for Nanny, but I don't hear any body talk of them now I am 
come home. Thou knows what the Children wants more than (I). I hope a 
fortnight or three weeks time at Farthest will Content thee and all thy 
friends to tame In the Towne of Boston. I told Ann Parsons that I 
thought I must go In the fall to meet thee. "In the Fall", said Slice 
Clapping her hands, "Surely She wont Stay so long from her Children." 
as I came home I met Father near her house, where he told me that 
Neddy and betty were att his house till I come home. So that I do 
Expect their Companyes quickly. Pray my dear make as little Stay as 
possible thou Can for their Sakes : th'y'relations knowes verry- well what 
naturale affections to Children meane, so that I think they wont desire 
thee to tarry long from them ; and In three weeks time, one may give an 
ample Acct. of all ones transactions for Seven years past ; and Vissit 
ones friends till they are Tired of one. 

"my dear though I much miss thy Company, yet I can truly Say that 
it is not upon my owne Accot. that I would have thee make as little 
Stay as thou Can, but for thy dear babes Sake, of whome I Shall take 
Care as much as In me lyes, In thy Absence, if thy tlViends think me 
Seveerc, tell them I would have thee Come the Sooner, now that thou 
may the sooner get leave to Come an Other time ; that if we and they 
live two or three year longer I intend to brim; them all to See their re- 
lations, if I find they will be acceptable to them. Give my Duty to 
Father and Mother, my love to Aunt Rodman and all our relations, if 
Joseph Pod man Comes by way of Road Island it will be a good oppor- 
tunity for thee to return with him, anil Doubtless he will tarrie eight or 
ten dayes for thee. I conclude with my Intire regard for thee. Expect- 
ing per next Post to know when I may Expect thee, I rot thy most 
Affectionate Companion, 

"JOS. SllIlTKX. 

"If thou should omit that Opportunity, I know not when thou will 
have another." 



. . mmm^mmm 



Life of Margaret Shippm, Wife of Bencificl Afield. 201 

Edward Sliippeu (of Lancaster) was br.rn in Boston, July 
9, 1703, and died at Lancaster on September 25, 1781. 

lie, in truth, was a many-sided man. ^Vlien he is found 
regretting, that he did not see the " contacts of Venus/' in 
June, 17G9; enjoying reading Telernaehus in tLo French; 
quoting Latin verses in his correspondence with Robert 
Cooper, the minister; ordering a oust of Pope in London in 
1749, and Ovid's "Epistles," "with ye. best notes ;" a sub- 
scriber to the Philadelphia Academy, aftenvards The Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania; a founder of Princeton in "J74G, 
and a trustee down to 17G7, it seems as if he were a scholar,, 
or perhaps a professor. 

When we see him a judge of the Common Pleas in Phil- 
adelphia, and afterwards at Lancaster, under both Provincial 
and State £covernmcnts, we misfit regard him as a lawyer. 
As prothonotary, as member of Council, and as mayor ot 
Philadelphia, he seemed like a politician. lie was a pay- 
master of army supplies* and his accounts were so satisfac- 
tory that he received the public thanks in 17G0, and in the 
Revolution he was on the Lancaster County committee. 

He was the agent in charge of Governor Hamilton's 
estate, consisting of the town plot of Lancaster and the land 
adjacent; and he discharged his duties with fidelity, not 
only in matters of moment, but also- in small and vexatious 
affairs; and when two sturdy rogues, David Schrock and 
Peter Osmus, " with cross-cut saws "and several axes," had 
cut down two great oaks on Hamilton's unindoscd Wood- 
land, they found that they had to step up to Edward Shi}>- 
pen's otlice and settle, even though they had sworn "that 
neither Devil nor Man could hurt them for what they had 
done." 

A\ r hen he became a landed proprietor and laid out Ship- 
pensburg, he found there were many troubles and worries. 
Hoopcs claimed that he /had an earlier warrant, and threat- 
ened to make deeds for Shippon*s land, Some purchasers 
appeared to have the faculty of always building their fences 
outside of their lines. Andrew Bovd, for some reason or 



mm. 



2G2 Life of Margaret Sk'ppcn, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

other, lias dammed up the stream; and " Robert llamel lias 
jfee<*uu to blow up the Rocks amongst' ye "Walnut Trees, 
before your door, which has in some measure injured them." 
One letter advised him to get rid of Matliias Carnpble, who, 
in Provincial writing, is a " verrey youseless tennant ;" and 
another letter from his agent conveyed the intelligence that 
he had in hand seventy pounds collected from ground rents, 
with which to pay a tax of six hundred and eighteen pounds, 
and that the commissioners had refused to reduce his assess- 
ment. And even "Johnny'' Piper's promise of a " Xarcass 
of A Bear worth notice" next fall was made conditional 
upon the bear getting plenty of acorns to fatten him up. 

And yet the business of Edward Shippen was to import 
thread, gunpowder, silk hose, guns, gaudy gartering, hats, 
rum, ribbons, knives, lead, fishing-lines, flints, Jew's harps, 
looking-glasses, trunks, beads, tobacco - tongs, brass wire, 
handkerchiefs, medals, hatchets, vermilion, brass kettles, 
red lead, and rings at twelve shillings a gross. Such goods 
were delivered to men who went among the Indians, and 
traded for furs, and afterwards made settlement with the 
merchants with the skins. And it sometimes happened that 
some unscrupulous rival would inveigle the trader into part- 
ing with the skins, and the rightful owner would be left 
with a lawsuit, instead of a bundle of furs ready for the 
London market. 

As far back as February 20, 1738, an " umberrella" was im- 
ported in the good ship Constantine, as shown by the in- 
voice, "for the proper account and risque" of Edward Ship- 
pen, who, for aught we know, might have worn that nine- 
shilling " umberrella" completely out years before Jonas 
Ilanway excited the ire of the London cabmen. Other 
items of that invoice, such as ''silver tea-spoons," " gloves," 
and "lace" at six shillings per yard, show the beginning of 
what was then regarded as extravagance and luxury. 

He was the iirst corporator mentioned in the charter of 
the Julianna Library of Lancaster, and was one of the com- 
mittee appointed to obtain, if possible, a picture 



,J. ..U.U 



I/?/d of Margaret Stippen, TVT/l' of Bab: diet Arnold. 2G3 

Pcnn to bo painted by Benjamin West. In striking con- 
trast to the quiet and seclusion of this library, we next be- 
hold him as a member of the Union File Company. But 
here this record ends, and we leave it to the reader's imagi- 
nation to picture Edward Shippen hastening to the scene of 
conflagration. In- the old letters we have momentary ac- 
counts of him ; at one time in the woods to collect skins, at 
another he has gone to " AYioming" to try to make some set- 
tlement, with those troublesome people from the East, who 
claimed that ill some manner Connecticut took a flying leap 
over Xew York and Xew Jersey, and then continued west- 
ward to the Pacific Ocean. After Braddoek's defeat, the 
province was in such a state of apprehension that he sent 
his account books and papers from Lancaster to Philadelphia 
for safe keeping. And he was at church upon that fatal 
Tuesday, at the time when the "Paxton Boys" came down 
to Lancaster and killed the Indians in' the AVork-IIousc, and 
thereby threw the whole province into confusion. In his 
own home he gave his grandson, Allen Burd, instruction in 
addition to his regular schooling, and writes to Colonel Burd 
as follows: "Allen improves greatly . . . under my Tuition," 
and naively adds, " k you know the great opinion I have of 
myself." Perhaps it was for the amusement of this bright 
boy (who died at the age often) that he perpetrated the fol- 
lowing: 

" A cibo biscocto, a Medico indocto, 
s Ab inimico reconciliato, a mala Muliere, 

Libera rios, Domine," 

which we venture to translate as follows: 

From food, when it is hash, 
From a young doctor who h rash, 
From foe reconciled, 
And from woman wild, 
Lord, keep this child. 

We have before us a curious old memorandum of things 
to be done^dated March 31, 17.V.I, which exhibits the daily 
occupations of Edward Shippen with an accuracy almost 



261 JJfe of jr<inj<in;t Shijtpek, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

photographic. It includes nearly everything from tlic pas- 
ture bars and hake-oven shed to Mr. Bitrd's calf and the 
cover of tile church wall; to graft the apple-trees and weed 
the cabbages ; to buy a barrel of sand and a pair of spec- 
tacles, a curry-comb and a chest for his deeds, a piece of 
linen and two whitewash brushes, as well as the " History of 
England." But we leave the reader to consult this memo- 
randum for himself in the Appendix, where it will be found 
printed in full, only we cannot help wondering whether the 
""White Silk Hat from Mrs. Arthur for my Wife" was Mrs. 
Shippen's Easter bonnet, and whether she got it in time 
and wore it on Easter, which, in 1759, fell on April 15. v 

Though we have seen him amid all the pressure and 
hurry of business, yet we may wonder what sort of a lover, 
husband, and father he was. A. few of the old letters shall 
tell their own story, and throw light upon this side of his 
character. 

On August 2, 1725, shortly after he had set out for 
Boston, Sarah Bluralcy (whom he married on September 
20, 1725) writes to' him as follows : 

" Dear Neddy, 

M As soon as you left me I went up stairs with a sorrowful heart & laid 
me down endeavouring to sleep but could not for you was so deep in 
my thoughts that I could not do any thing all that day, but think of 
you and the dear parting expressions, & the next day I went anil sat 
with Cousin Bay n ton all day to divert myself. Wednesday night I sent 
billy to see if the post was come he was not come then and I sent him 
iup next morning and the post was come but there was no letter. Satur- 
day when your Father was out of town John Rcarscy brought the letters 
& Josey was here & I could not be easy till he had opened it, & I took 
mine out with abundance of joy & am glad to hear you are well & that 
you like your horse & the opinion I have of your r«incere love makes me 
easy & nothing but Death shall put an end to it & dont forget her who 
shall ever continue to be your most sineere and affectionate friend 

"Sara.ii Plvmly." 

And "Neddy" <rot nr> at live o'clock in the morning to 
commence the following letter from Boston: 



Life of ' Jftuynret 8hippen % Wife of Benedict Arnold. 2G5 

"After a pretty fatiguing journey ia~t night about ten o'clock ill good 
health I reached this place, where my relations were overjoyed to receive 
me. My Grandmother tells me she heard I v.a j going to have my 
Mother-in-law's daughter. I told her it was true enough, and that >he 
was a very deserving prett\ young lady, •well 1 says &he, 'make haste 
and marry, and bring her to live in Boston.' 'Well, well,' says I. 

11 My dear soul I beg you to be clioice of your health. I am not (as I 
told you at parting) at all afraid of my Father's slighting you, for I 
know he always respected you, and will show it more in my absence 
than presence. I desire earnestly that you may provide some Gf the 
necessary things for our settling. 

"What signifies fretting my dear .pretty soul at things that can not be 
helped, you and I love one another dearly and I hope as it hath pleaded 
God to conduct me safely here, so lie will extend His love further by 
guarding me safe home again. 

"I am visiting my friends who are ready to set me up. I believe there 
never was a more loving and kind people in ye world," my Grand-mother 
lives handsomely but has nothing to spare, only good-will and kindness 
till she dies — All my Aunts and their daughters are exceedingly well 
married. They gett me to dinner at one place to-day — then make me 
promise to dine at another place tomorrow and to sup at another and so 
they carry me about. I have a maiden Aunt lives with my Grandmother 
ye very image of my own Mother; both of them bid me remember 
their kind love to you. 

"If the vessel would but come I would sooii dispatch her and myself 
too. No danger of Indians however my Grandmother has given me a 
pr. of Tistles worth £6* or £7 and I fear no man. I had no Coinp.y all 
the way except the last 50 miles. I am not one bitt worse for riding nor 
have hardly had a toueh of that pain since. 

"Lett me beg of you honey to take as much care of your health as I 
do of mine. So conclude with dear love to my Dearest Sally, 

"her sincere friend 

Enw.n Smrrr.N*." 

Twenty-four years later lie wrote to his son, Edward 
Bbippcn (afterwards chief justice), then completing his 
legal studies in the Temple at London, as follows : 

"I take notice of the Relation you give me concerning your Affairs at 
the Temple, &the Expenses yon have been in it 6 in going about to see 
the Rarities of England, iV in keeping Comp. with Gentlemen of Sense, 

& tho' some People here, -of high conceit will condemn you, for spend- 
ing any time from your Studies, excepting sometimes of an livening, 
Vet I much approve of yourConduet for you will have an opportunity 



200 L[fc of Margaret Sktypen, Wife of Benedict ArnoH. 

of Heading Books at your Return, but not so good an cue to read Men; 
You may remember my advice to you at Parting (among other thing*) 
was to ri-e early ec to study hard till Dinner time that you might have 
the afternoons to look about yen ; and notwithstanding you will co?t me 
a good deal, yet if I had money to spare I would send you a.* much 
more." 

Happy the son with such a father, and fortunate the 
father whose son would not abuse the license so given ! 

He was a genial man; rose early; was fond of good, 
hearty living, but temperate. He cultivated his asparagus 
garden, and was proud of his peaches; and as far back as 
1700 we come across the information that a little wine upon 
the strawberries improves them very much. He writes that 
he hopes Colonel Burd " will be home on December 25 
(1759) to eat a roast Turkey;" and he knew about turkeys 
oh ovo, for his advice is to " keep ye young ones in ye barn 
for a week & put them up when it rains while they are very 
young." 

In 1704, Jasper Yeates drew the pen-portrait of Edward 
Shippen, of Lancaster, as follows : 

"But peculiarities out of the question, I know none happier in their 
temper & disposition, or any who have a greater fund of pleasantry & 
good humour than the old Gentleman. In a minute, he relates to me ten 
diilercnt stories, interlarding each narrative with choice scraps of Latin, 
Greek Sc French." . . . "Scarce a moment of the day passes over, but 
I receive some new piece of instruction, either for the regulating my 
judgment or conduct, & even when I take a walk with the old Don, 
seldom fail getting a lesson from him, tho' it be only to teach me to 
mount a rail fence with safety and dexterity." 

His silver tankard, benight in 1771 of Philip Syng for four- 
teen pounds sterling, shows the marks ot^ use, for the hinge 
of the lid is almost worn through; and a letter ot' Neddy 
Burd gives us this glimpse of him in hia sixty-ninth year: 
"Mr. Sanders told me he heard from Mr. Barton You was 
as merry as any at the Wedd[ing] A surprized him by 
your activity in dancing the Cobbler's dig." 
(To be continued.) 



wmmmmm^^m 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert Nacsam. 2G7 



LITHOGRAPHIC FORTBAITS OF ALBERT STEWSAM 

■ BY D. >I C X. STAUFFEB. 

Lithography, or the art of drawing upon and printing 
from a peculiar limestone, chiefly found in Solenhofcn, Ba- 
varia, was discovered by Aloys Senefelder about 170G. It 
was commercially introduced into Rome and London about 
1809, into Paris in 1814, and was apparently first experi- 
mented with in the United States in 1819. In any event, 
we find in the Analcetlc Magazine, published in Philadelphia 
in 1819, two examples of lithographic work by the portrait- 
painter, Bass Otis. The text tells us that the stone used 
was brought from Munich, and the examples referred to are 
really etchings upon stone, though one of them, signed 
"Bass Otis, lithographic," plainly shows the lithographic 
grain in the shadows. 

As to the time and place of the commercial introduction 
of lithography into the United States there is considerable 
dispute, Philadelphia, Boston, and Xew York each claim- 
ing that honor. As near as can be now learned the race 
was very close between the two latter cities. The Boston 
Magazine for December, 1825, contains an account of Scne- 
felder's discovery, and then remarks that " nothing has been 
done to introduce lithography into this country, unless a few 
attempts- in Xcw York can be verified, until within a few 
months, when John Pendleton commenced an establishment 
for lithography in this city." This John Pendleton was 
born in New York State; visited Paris, and there becoming 
interested in lithography, lie studied the art under the French 
masters, and brought back with him to America the stones 
and other materials necessary, lie established himself in 
business in Boston along with his brother, a copper-plate 
printer. The magazine referred to contains some examples 
of the work of his press, the drawings on stone being chiefly 



2G8 



JJthof/ropJ'ic Portraits of Albert Xeicsam. 



made by Thomas Edwards. Among the early Boston li- 
thographers, or at least those who drew upon stone, may be 
mentioned the artists-F. Alexander, D. C. Johnston, William 
Hoagland, and J. 11. Penniman, besides Mr. Edwards men- 
tioned above. 

The claim of Xew York rests upon the lithographic es- 
tablishment started in that city by A. Imbert, who was cer- 
tainly publishing* prints of this character as early as 1S20. 
He thus illustrated the "Account of the Grand Canal Cele- 
bration," and published music and miscellaneous litho- 
graphic prints. The names appended to this work are those 
of foreigners, — F. Duponchel, Banncou, and Canova, — and 
Mr. Imbert doubtless imported his draughtsmen along with 
his plant. It is interesting to note, however, that the vign- 
ette on the title-page of the "Account" is seemingly drawn 
upon the stone by the artist Archibald Robertson; and an- 
other lithograph, published by Mr. Imbert in 18'26,is signed 
as " Drawn upon stone by a young lady." Some time pre- 
vious to 1S30 Peter Maverick, of Xcw York, added lithog- 
raphy to his business of copper-plate engraving and printing. 
In Philadelphia the dates are somewhat uncertain, but about 
1829-30 Cephas G-. Childs did the same thing there that 
Maverick did in Xew York, and produced the best litho- 
graphic work seen in the United States up to that date. 
Other early Philadelphia lithographers were Childs & In- 
man, Kennedy & Lucas, Lehman & Duval, and Pendleton, 
Kearny & Childs. 
s Lithography was peculiarly adapted to the reproduction 
of portraits; and the first man in- the United States to 
achieve any considerable reputation as a delineator of por- 
traits upon stone was Albert Newsam, the subject of the 
present sketch. His work was characterized by an absolute 
faithfulness of likeness and by an artistic finish peculiarly 
its own; and his portraits have an added historical value in 
being, in many cases, the only published portraits of persons 
prominent in the political, professional, social, and business 
life of the first half of the last centurv. 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert Kef-pm. -'C9 

In tardy justice to the man and the artist, and in the in- 
terest of those to whom his portraits have value, a begin- 
ning is here made in what it is hoped may some time 
result in a complete and systematic record of the litho- 
graphic work of Alhert Xewsam. The list given includes 
only such examples as have actually been examined by the 
compiler, and he is well aware of its incompleteness. The 
larger portion of the unlettered impressions noted were found 
in a collection which at one time belonged to Mr. Xewsam 
himself, and was then presented to the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania by the late John A. McAllister. The full titles 
to these may be supplied from lettered prints when these 
are found. A large number of portraits made by Mr. 
Xewsam were also intended for private use only; for dis- 
tribution in the family and anions: friends. As these were 
issued in very limited editions, a number of them may well 
have escaped record. 

The life of Albert Xewsam had a somewhat romantic and 
interesting begin-miis?: and the following brief sketch is 
largely taken from a memoir, published in 1868, by Mr. Jo- 
seph D. Pyott, one time an instructor in the Pennsylvania 
Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, where Xewsam received 
his early training. 

Albert Xewsam, the son of a boatman on the Ohio River 
and a deaf-mute from birth, was born in Steubenville, Ohio, 
on -May 20, 1800. His father, William Xewsam, was acci- 
dentally, drowned while Alhert was still very young, and 
William Hamilton, an innkeeper of the town, assumed 
charge of the orphan. Deprived of both hearing and speech, 
the boy began early to express his wants and his ideas by 
rudely tracing the outlines of objects; iuu\ Ideal tradition 
has it that by the time he was ten years of age these draw- 
ings of his were so remarkable for their accuracy of form 
and proportion that they attracted much attention. 

About thi.s time there appeared at Steubenville one Wil- 
liam P. Davis, also a deaf-mute, who lodged with Mr. Ham- 
ilton. Davis noted the budding talent of young Xewsam, 



270 IJf.hrifjraphlr- Portraits of Albert Ncwsam* 

and he determined to utilize it for his own profit, and to this 
end he professed to take great interest in the orphan on the 
ground of their common affliction. He finally succeeded in 
obtaining possession of the hoy by promising to have him 
educated and permanently cared for, and lie started eastward 
with his prize. 

As soon as he had left Steubenville Davis began to develop 
his-scheme by using the boy to attract attention and charity. 
He made. Albert exhibit his skill in drawing, and then inti- 
mated to his audience that he was collecting money for the 
purpose of having his " little brother" educated at a school 
recently founded for the training of the deaf and dumb. lie 
collected considerable money in this way, and early in 1820 
the pair reached Philadelphia, and it was while young 
Xcwsam was making a drawing with chalk upon the side of 
one of the old city watch-boxes that lie attracted the atten- 
tion of Bishop William White, the first president of the 
newly founded Institution for the Deaf and Dumb in Phila- 
delphia. 

Bishop White called the attention of the managers of the 
institution to the presence in the city of two deaf-mutes who 
were seemingly in need of assistance, and William Mere- 
dith, Esq., one of the managers, sought out and found Davis 
and his protege. The older man told a pathetic tale of the 
various misfortunes that had brought himself and k * his 
brother" to their then condition, and he stated that they 
were on their way to Richmond, Virginia, in search of assist- 
ance from relations. His story was believed, and money 
was given him fur his journey; but he was finally per- 
suaded to leave the boy at the institution until he returned. 

For reasons which can be guessed at, Davis failed to re- 
appear, and the records of the institution show that Albert 
NeWSani, or Davis, as he was then called, was regularly ad- 
mitted as a State pupil on May 15, 1S20. The managers 
soon discovered that lie was no relation of Davis, but his 
true name was only found out by accident several \ ears after 
his admission. It then happened that a Mr. Wright, ot % 



■■ 



Litkograpldc Portraits of Albert Nacsum. 271 

Steubenville, visited the institution with some Philadelphia 
friends, and upon his appearance in the school-room Albert 
exhibited great excitement. Attracting the attention of the 
visitor, the boy rapidly sketched upon a blackboard the view 
of a house, which Mr. Wriglit at once recognized as his 
own. The boy then drew a plan of certain streets and 
another house, and plainly indicated that lie had once lived 
in this second house. Mr. Wright finally remembered the 
deaf and dumb boy who had disappeared from the home of 
"William Hamilton, and recalled the name of Xewsam. 

The artistic talent of Xewsam continued to develop at the 
institution to such an extent that the managers placed him 
for a time under the tuition of George Catlin, well known 
for his representations of Indian life, and under that of 
Hugh Bridport, a clever miniature painter and engraver. 
His regular course at the institution ended in 1S2G, and in 
the following year Xewsam was apprenticed to Cephas G. 
Cliilds, of Philadelphia, to be taught the art of engraving 
upon copjper, and in the mean time he was to continue his art 
studies by attending the evening classes of the Pennsylvania 
.Academy of Fine Arts. 

"While Xewsam was in the service of Mr. Childs the lat- 
ter added lithography to his previous business of engraver 
and print publisher; and here the peculiar ability of the 
youmc man found a new Held of activity. Under the in- 
struetion of Mr. P. S. Duval, who came from Europe to take 
charge of the lithographic department in Mr. Childs's estab- 
lishment, Xewsam made rapid progress in acquiring the art 
N of drawing upon stone, and he soon founded his reputation 
as a lithographer of portraits. .As early as 1830 he made at 
least two excellent portraits of this character, those of De 
Witt Clinton and Dugald Stewart. In 1831, Henry lnman, 
the artist, was associated in business with Mr. Childs, and 
for this firm of Childs & lnman Xewsam did much of his 
earlier and best work. Later, Mr. Duval succeeded to the 
business of this iirm, and was for many years the employer 
of the deaf-mute artist. 



27*2 Lithographic Portraits of Albert. Newsam. 

Mr. Duval says that Xcwsam was a faithful copyist rather 
than an artist ; and this opinion is borne out by the fact that 
the merit of Newsanrs portraits depends largely upon tlie 
character and excellence of the painting or daguerreotype 
used as copy. The prints signed by him as " drawn from 
life" are not, as a rule, examples ol his best work, and his 
biographer explains this as follows: " As Xewsam could 
neither speak nor hear others. speak, he was unable to en- 
gage his sitter in conversation, and thus impart some anima- 
tion to. the face. The. enforced silence on the part of the 
model was apt to be reflected in a semi-bored expression, 
and this expression Xewsam faithfully copied. This same 
disability affected his success as a portrait-painter, when he 
attempted that branch of art in 1855, under the tuition of 
Mr. Lambdin ; but he signally failed in producing accept- 
able portraits. 

According to his contemporaries, Mr. Newsam had an 
exceptionally correct eye for form, and a memory of such 
remarkable power that he could always draw whatever he 
had once seen. Personally, he had good sense and pleasing 
manners and made many warm friends. Though in receipt 
of an income considered large at that time, he was care- 
less of acquiring wealth, and he spent his money about as 
fast as he made it in buying- fine illustrated books, expen- 
sive engravings, and especially the lithographic work of the 
French and English masters of the art. The collections of 
hooks and prints thus accumulated was partly lost through 
a false friend and partly destroyed in the burning of the 
Duval establishment, wherein Newsam had his studio. 

Until 1857 Mr. Xewsam was in the most robust health ; 
but in that year the sight of his right eye became affected, 
and to save the other he was compelled to abandon work. 
He partly recovered from this threatened loss of sight : but, in 
October, 1859, a greater aiilietiou befell him, for one side of 
his body was completely paralyzed. He was admitted to the 
Pennsylvania Hospital, where he remained one year: at the 
end oi that time the physiciaus declared his case incurable, 



ii^m f±j+* *•«■ <• — - ■^-^— ■»». « .*« 



■■■^■M 



Uthographk Portraits of Albert Ncwsam. 273 

and under the rules of the institution lie was forced to seek 
refuge elsewhere. 

Mr. Xewsam was without accumulated funds and totally 
unable to perform any professional work, and he was at last 
compelled to seek admittance to the Bleckley Almshouse, 
where he remained until 1862. In this year some of his old 
friends met at the house of John A. McAllister to devise 
means of placing Mr. Xewsam in a more comfortable and 
respectable institution; and as a result of this meeting a 
fund was raised, to which the chief subscribers were Francis 
II. Duft'ce, Ferdinand J. Dreer, Edwin Greble, Julius Lee, 
John A. McAllister, and Charles Grobe. With the money 
thus obtained Mr. Xewsam was placed in the Living 
Home, near Wilmington, Delaware, a pleasantly situated 
and thoroughly respectable institution, founded by Dr. John 
A. Browne, of Xew England. Here. Mr. Xewsam died on 
November 20, 1864, and he was buried in Laurel Hill 
Cemetery, the funeral being held from the house of his 
faithful friend, John A. McAllister. 

Note.- — In the list here given the dimensions of prints are measured, 
vertically and horizontally, from the confining rectangle or oval, or from 
the extreme limits of the drawing ; the title is not included in these 
measurements. The dimensions are in inches and to the nearest six- 
teenths of an inch ; and for convenience, these sixteenths are written 
"decimally ;" so that 7] ins., or 7 i s ins., is set down as 7.12 ins. 

Those comparing prints by measurements alone are cautioned that 
all paper docs not shrink alike in drying, and impressions from the 
same plate do not always measure exactly the same. And in using the 
shaded background as the limits of measurement slight discrepancies in 
measurement may again occur, as the impression is light or strong. 

The compiler would ask that those having Xewsam portraits not here 
noted should send descriptions of these to the Historical Society o( Penn- 
sylvania ; adhering ns closely as possible, in these descriptions, to the 
form here adopted. In this manner only can a complete record be 
made of the lithographic work of Albert Xewsam, 

. " Abd-el-Kadeu. 

Half-length; face almost profile to right. From Parlour 
Review, No. 2. Size, 0x5 in* 

VOL. .XXIV. — 1* 



274 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Xewsam. 

John Adams. 

Rectangular ; bust; face f to 'right P. S. Duval, lith. 

Size, G.8x3.14 ins. 

Ibid. 

Full bust; nice § to left. P. S. Duval, lith. Size, 5.9 x4 

ins. 

Ljid. 

Oval in an ornamented rectangular frame; bust; face J 
right. A. Xewsam, del., after Stuart. Published by C. S. 
Williams, Philadelphia, 1846. Full title— John Adams | 
2nd. President of the United States. Size, 10. G x 8.15 ins. 

Ibid. 

Rectangular, full bust, face f to left. " Drawn &, printed 
by Chikls & Inman" — but unsigned by Xewsam. Unlet- 
tered example. Size, 6x5 ins. 

J. Q. Adams. 
Rectangular; bust; face | to left. P. S. Duval, lith. 
Size, 6.8x3.14 ins. 

James Allen. 

Half length; face -J to right. From a daguerreotype. P. 
S. Duval, lith., for Edward Clarkson, Philadelphia. Full 
title — Signature | Rev'd James Allen | of the M. E. Church. 
Size, 8.12x0.4 ins. 

Thomas G. Allen. 

Oval ; half-length ; face slightly to left, in robes. From 
a photograph by M. P. Simons; P. S. Duval, liih. Title— 
Yours in the Gospel | Thos. G. Allen. Size, 7.14 x 5.12 ins. 

William J. B, Andrews. 
Full length in uniform; face J to right; standing by a 
horse. A. Xewsam from life. Published in I'. S. Military 
Magazine, JIuddy & Duval, Philadelphia. Title — To Lieut. 
Col. Wm. J. B. Andrew^ Aid to his | Excellency David R 
Porter | this plate is must respectfully dedicated | by Muddy 
& Duval. Size, 8.1 x 8.4 ins. 



i 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert Nacsam. 275 

It. Arthur. 
Full bust; face § to right. P. S. Duval & Son, lith. 
Title— Yours truly | II. Arthur. Size, 0.12 x 7.G ins. 

.John Wi Bakr. 

Full bust- face f to left. J. Eicholtz, pinxt. Published 
by A\ r m. M. JIuddy, Philadelphia, 1840. * Title—John W. 
Bear | The Buckeye Blacksmith of Ohio. Si/A-, 7.2 x 6.8 
ins. 

Ibid. 

Half-length: face J to left. A. Xewsain from life. P. S. 
Duval, lith. for Daniel McGinley, Philadelphia, 1844. Title 
—-Signature | J. \7. Baer | The Buckeye Blacksmith of 
Ohio | " I am in favor of extending, etc." Size 10.8 x 8.S 
ins. 

John Banks. 

Rectangular; half-length; lace f to left. J. B. Schoener, 
pinxt. P. S. Duval, lith. Philadelphia, 1840. Title— Hon. 
John Banks | President Judge of the Third Judicial Dis- 
trict.. Size, 7.4x6.4 ins. 

William Badger. 

Three-quarter length ; right hand on book ; face f to right. 
P. S. Duval & Co. lith. Title— Win. Badger. Size 8.10 x 
6.12 ins. 

John C. Baker. 

Half-length, seated ; face J to left. From a daguerreotype 
by Johnson. P. S. Duval, lith., for' Spangler & Pro. Lan- 
caster, Pa. Title— Pev'd John 0. Baker | Pastor of Ev. 
Luth. Church of the Holy Trinity | Lancaster, Pa. Size, 
0.10 xS jns. 

W. Baker. 

Half-length; face slightly to right. A. Kcwsam, del. P. 
S. Duval, lith., Philadelphia. Title— as ahpve. Size, 4.S x 
3.0 ins. 



27G Ltilh.Qfjraphk Portraits of Albert Newsam. 

Albert! Barnes. 
Half-length, seated; face f to right. A. Xewsnni from 
life. P. S^ Duval, lith., for The 17. S. Ecclesiastical Portrait 
Gallery, published by Thomas S. Wagner, Philadelphia. 
Title— Rcv'd. Albert Barnes. Size, 7 x G ins. 

Ibid. 
Full bust; face f to left, J. Xeagle, pinxt Childs & 
Inman, lith., for R. II. Ilobson, Philadelphia. Title— Rcv'd 
Albert Barnes | Pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, 
Philadelphia. Size, 5 x 4.9 ins. 

J. Beecher. 
Half-length, right hand holding a Bible; face f- to left. 
Brewster, pinxt. P. S. Duval, lith., Philadelphia. Title- 
as above. Size, 9x8 ins. 

L. von Beethoven. 

Half-length, face } to right. Published in Parlour Re- 
view, No. 1, Philadelphia. Title — L. v. Beethoven. 
Size, 5.6 x 5.G ins. 

Alen Beith. 

Half-length, in robes; full face. From a photograph. 
P. S. Duval, lith., for Joseph M. Wilson. Title— Alen 
Beith | Pastor of the North Presbyterian Church, Stirling, 
Scotland | Moderator of the General Assembly of the Free 
Church of Scotland, 1858. Size, G.2 x 5 ins. 

Bellini. 

Three-quarter length, standing; face } to right. 1"*. S. 
Duval, lith. Title — as above. Size, 6 x 5.4 ins. 

John D. Bemo. - 
Full length, standing, Bible in right hand : face ] to left. 
A. Newsam from lite. P. S. Duval, lith. Title — John D. 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert Newmm. 277 

Bcmo | or Husti-Coluc-Chec j Xephew of the celebrated 
Seminole Chief Oceola j Converted to Christianity at sea, 
etc. Size, 15.7 x 10 ins. 

J. P. Bi:rg. 
. Half-length, seated; face J to left. A. Newsaro, del. P. 
S. Duval, lith., for Thos. S. Wagner, Philadelphia. Title— 
Rev'd J. F. Berg. Size 6.8 x 5.3 ins. 

John M. Berioex. 
Rectangular; half-length; face f to left. .King, pinxt. 
Pendleton, Kearny & Chilcls, lith*, Philadelphia. Tiilc — 
John M. Berrien | of Georgia j Attorney General. Size, 
3.7 x 3 ins. Xot signed, but ascribed to xsewsam. 

J. Pc-RTEit BeWEEY. 

Full bust, face slightly to right. A. Xewsam, del. P. S. 
Duval, lith. Title— as above. Size, 4.3 x 3.G ins. 

William Bigler. 
Half-length ; face f to left. From daguerreotype by 
McClees & Gcrmon. Published by Harrison, Philadelphia. 
Title— Wm. Bigler | Clearfield | Pennsylvania. Size, 9.12 
x 8.12 ins. 

Horace Binney. 

Full bust; face f to left. Childs & Inman, lith., Phila- 
delphia — Size, 7.15 x 8.6* ins. The only copy seen is unlet- 
tered and is not signed by Xewsam ; but it is evidently his 
work. 

Robert M. Bird. 

Full bust, front face. From a daguerreotype by M. A. 
Root. P. S. Duval, lith. Title cut oil' in copy seen. Size, 
10.4 x 7.15 ins. 

Andrew Blair. 

Half-length; face J to left. A. Xewsatti from life. P. S. 
Duval, lith. Title— Your affectionate father | And'w Blair. 
Size, 8.14 x 8.4 ins. 



278 Lithographic Portraits of AlUrt New so m. 

Will A. Blount. 
. Half-length ; front face. P. S.'Duval & Co., lith., Pbila- 
"delphia. Title — as above. Size, 10.6 x 7.8 ins. 

A. Bolmar. 
Full bust, face | to left. P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. Title 
— signature as above. Size, 7.9 x 5.10 ins. 

James C. Booth. 
Bust; face § to right. From a daguerreotype by M. A. 
Root. P. S. Duval k Co. lith. Title— Jas. C. Booth. Size 
7.3 x 6.5 ins. 

F. J. Boxduel. . •. 

Half-length; iace } to right. Title— L'Abbe F. J 
Bonduel | Pretre Missionaire en Amerique (Etats Unis) | 
ordotme au Detroit, le 9 Fevrier 1834. Size, 5.8 x 4.14 ins. 

George Boyd. 
Full bust; face f to right; Jos. B. Ord pinxt. ; Ckilda k 
Inman, lith., Philadelphia. Title — Rev. Geo. Boyd. | Bector 
of Saint Johns Episcopal Church | in the Northern Liberties 
of Philadelphia. Size — 7 x 7.4 ins. 

John Breckinridge. 
Half-length, face f to right. J. Sartain, pinxt. P. S. 
Duval, lith., for U. S. Ecclesiastical Portrait Gallery, pub- 
lished by Thos. S. Wagner, Phila. Title— Pev. Jno. 
Breckinridge D.D. Size, 5.12 x 5.7 ins. 

A. G. Br.o.vDUEAD, Jr. 
Half-length; face ^ to left. Title: A. G. Broad head Jr. 
| Superintendent of Beaver Meadow Kail Road. Size — 
x 4.8 ins. 

William Francis Broit.ii. 
; Full bust; face J to right. P. S. Duval, lith. Title- 
signature as above. Size, 8.4 X 8.5 ins. 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert Ncwsani. 279 

David Paul Diiowx. 
Half-length, to right; lace J to left. Xeagle, pinxt., P. S. 
Duval lith. Title. David Paul Brown | From a portrait 
painted by Xeagle Tor the Junior Members of the Phila. 
Bar | and presented by them to the Law Library of Phila- 
delphia. Size, 8 x 7.12 ins. 

W. H. Brown. 
Half length ; face f to right. A. Xewsam from life ; P. 
S. Duval, lith. Title — signature as above. Size, 8.8 x 
7.10 ins. 

James Buciiaxax. 

Half-length; face £ to right. Painted by J. Henry 
Brown ; drawn on stone by A. jXcwsam ; P. S. Duval Steam 
lith. Press, Phila. Published by Harrison, 39 South 
Eighth St., Phila. Title. — signature as above: Size, 11.4 x 
7.8 in. 

AVilliam E. Burton. 

Half length; hat on head; face f to right. T. Sully, 
pinxt, ; P. S. Duval, lith. Title— Mr. William E. Burton *| 
In the. character of " Bob Acres" in Sheridan's Comedy of 
The Rivals. Size 9.10 x 8.8 ins. 



James R. Campbell. 
Full bust, face slightly to left; wearing glasses. Mr. 
Brewster, pinxt. ; published by Juvenile- Foreign Missionary 
Society, Philadelphia. Title — as above. Size 4.9 x 4.4 ins. 

W. S. Campbell. 

Half length, face J to right. A. Newsain from life; P. S. 
Duval, lith. Title — as above. Size, 6.1 x 5.-1 ins. 

Matthew Carey. 
Half length, face f to left; J. Xeagle. pinxt. Lehman & 
Duval, lith. Philadelphia*. Not signed but ascribed to 
Xewsam. Tjitlc— it Carey. Size 5.2 x . r >.* ins. 



280 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Nacsa 



m. 



CHARLES GAKROKL OV CaRROI.LTON. 

Full bust, front face. T. Sully.; janxt. 1S2C; published 
by T. Sully, Childs & Inhian; Philadelphia, 1832. Title — 
Ch. Carroll, of Carrollton. Size 9.4 x 7.12 ins. 

D. L. Carroll. 
Full bust, face J to right. A. Xcwsam, del. ; F. S. Duval 
lith., for U. S. Ecclesiastical Portrait Gallery, published by 
Tlios. S. Wagner, Philadelphia. Title— Pev'd 1). L. Car- 
roll, D.I). Size, 5.12 x 4.15 ins. 

Mrs. Catalixa. 
Half length, face front. Published in Parlour Review, 
No. 4, Philadelphia. — Title — as above. Size 5.8 x 4.10 ins. 

Joseph 11. Chandler. 
Half length, face £ to left. From daguerreotype by 
McClces & Gerinon; P. S. Duval, lith. ^Titlc— Jos. R. 
Chandler. Size 9.12 x 9 ins. 

Ibid. 
Three-quarter length, face f to left ; with Masonic re- 
galia. P. S. Duval, lith. Title— Yours fraternally | Jos. P. 
Chandler. Size, 5.12 x 3.12 ins. 

IWD, 

Three-quarter length, standing, in Masonic regalia: face 
I to left, "From life on stone by A. Ncwsam ;' ? P. S. 
Duval, lith. Title.— Yours Fraternally | Jos. P. Chandler. 
Size, 5.10x4.4 ins. 

Thomas M. Clark. 

Three-quarter length, face J to left; with robes. From 
a daguerreotype by T. P. & P. (\ Collins, and published by 
the fame, Philadelphia, 1 SIT. Title — Very truly Yours | 
Thomas M. Clark | Pev'd Thomas M. Clark | Late Rector 
of St. Andrews Church, Philada — etc. Si xe— 11.3 x 11.8 
ins. 



Litliograpl-ic Portraits of Albert Neicsam. 281 

Henry Clay. 
Full bust, face f to loft. John Neagle, pinxt., P. S. 
Duval, lith,, Philadelphia— 1S-14. Title— II. Clay | Henry 
Clay | From Ncagles original painting | Executed by A. 
Newsam under the immediate supervision of the Painter 
from the full length* Portrait | in the Hall of the National 
Clay Club, painted at Ashland by John Xeagle for the 
Whigs of Philadelphia. Size— 1D.4 x 9.6 ins. 

Ibid. 
Half-length, face f to rigid. J. Wood, pinxt., Pendleton, 
Kearny & Childs, lith., for I). Mallory, New York. Title- 
Henry Clay. Size 9.5 x 7.3 ins. 

Cassius M. Clay. 
Three-quarter length, seated to right; face j to right. 
From daguerreotype by T. P. Collins, and published by 
him;' Philadelphia, 1846. Title — signature as above. Size 
—10.6 x 11.8 ins. 

De "Witt Clinton. 

Half-length; face | to left. II. Inman, N.A., pinxt.; 
published by C. G. Childs, Phila.,and II. Inman, Xcw York, 
1830. Title— as above. Size— 5.2 x 5.2 ins. 

Isaac Collins. 
Half length, face J to left. Jarvis, pinxt. Title— Unlet- 
tered proof Size 5:10 x G ins. 

Ir.iD. 
Oval; half-length, face J to left. From photograph by 
James McClees; P. S.Duval, lith., Philadelphia/ Title- 
Isaac Collins. Size 10 x 8 ins. 

George W*. Colloday. 
Full bust, face J to right. Daguerreotype by M. A. Moot. 
1855; P. S. Duval k Go. Steam lith. Unlettered example. 
Size 10 x 8.13 ins. 



282 IJfl'.ogrupkic Portraits of Albert Newsam, 

Joirv Colt. 
Half-length, face f to right. Henry Innian, pinxt., P. S. 
Duval, lith. Title— Yours truly | Jiio. Colt. Size 11.12 x 
9.6 ins. 

Alexander Cook, 
Silhouette; full lengthy profile to right. W. H. Brown, 
del., P. S. Duval, lith. Title — signature as above. Size, 
9.2 x G.14 ins. 

Joseph T. Cooper. 
Half-length, front face. From a dacruerreotvpe. • P. S. 

O ' O t.' 1 

Duval, lith., for Joseph M. Wilson, Philadelphia. Title— 
Joseph T. Cooper | Pastor of the Second Associate Presby- 
terian Church, Philadelphia, Pa. | Moderator of the Asso- 
ciate Synod for 1858. Size, 5.8 x 4.4 ins. 

Edmos S. Coxxer. 
Half-length, face J right. T. Sully, pinxt., P. S. Duval, 
lith. Title— Edmon S. Conner [ of the Philadelphia Theatre 
| as, | Romeo. Size 10 x 9.6 ins. 

Com. Creightox, U.S.jST. 
Half-length, face riishtly to left. Childs & Inman, lith. 
Philadelphia. Title — unlettered proof in Newsam Collec- 
tion. Size 5.8 x 5.8 ins. 

David Crockett. 
Rectangular, half-length, almost front face. S. S. Osgood, 
pinxt., Childs k Inman, lith. Phila., 1834. Title— David 
Crockett | with three lines in autograft below and signa- 
ture. Size °>.5 x 7.8 ins. 

George M. Dallas. 

Head only, face \ to left. Wholly unlettered, hut ascribed 
to Newsam. Size 4.4 x 4.2 ins. 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert New 



-a in. 



Oft- 



83 



"William Darlington. 
Half-length, face J to right. P. S. Duval lith. Title— 
Win. Darlington, M.D. | Anno iEtatis LXV. Size 8 x 
5.12 ins. 

Samuel B. Davis. 
Half-length in uniform, face f to left. T. Sully, pinxt. 
Title — unlettered proof. Size — 9.4 x 8 ins. 

C. R Demme. 
Ecctangalar, half-length, face f to left. From daguerreo- 
type by W. & F. Langenheim. Title — signature as above | 
Rev'd." C. R. Demme. D.D. | Pastor of St. Michael k Zion 
Churches, Phila. Size— 12.0 x 9.7 ins. 

E. A. Douglas. 
Half-length, face § to left. P; S. Duval & Sons, lith. 
Title — Yours truly | E. A. Douglas | Supt. & Eng. Lehigh 
Canal. Size 5.6 x 4.G ins. 

Jesse D. Elliott. 
• Half-length, in uniform, hands on a sword, face J to right. 
Title — Unlettered proof in Xewsam Collection. Size — 4.10 
x ?>.14 ins. 

Fanny Elssler. 
Half-length, face f to left. From a daguerreotype by 
Cornelius. Title— Mille Fanny Elssler. Size 5.10 x 4.1 ins. 



John England. 
Half-length, seated to left; profile left. P. S. Duval, lith. 
for Eugene Cammisky, Philadelphia. Title — Rt. Rev. John 
England D.D. | Signature. Size 11.12 x 9.2 ins. 

Isaac Ferris. 
Half-length in clerical robes to front, face J to left. A. 
Newsam from life; P. S. Duval, lith. Title — as above — 
Size, 9.12 x 9.10 ins. 



284 Lithographic Portraits of Albert NcirsaM. 

Thomas B. Florence. 
Oval, throe-quarter length, standing, lace j to right. 
From photograph by Brady. Lithographed by Thos. S. 
Wagner, Phila. Title — Thomas B. Florence | Represent- 
ative from Pennsylvania | Truly Yr. friend | Thomas P. 
Florence. Size, 17.14 x 13.10 ins. 

L. Forxarari. 
Full bust face § to left. G. Ribpni, pinxt, P. S. Duval, 
lith. Title— as above. Size— 9.5 x 9.10 ins. 

Edwin Forrest. 
Full bust face f to right. T. Sully, pinxt., Lehman k 
Duval, lith. for C. Alexander, Phila. *183G. Title— signa- 
ture as above. Size— 7. S x 7.4 ins. 

George Fox. 
Full bust, face J to left. Title. George Fox | Founder 
of Society of Friends, usually called Quakers. Size, 7 J 1 x 
7 ins. 

Peter Fritz. 

Half-length, standing, in uniform, face J to right. Free- 
land, pinxt., P. S. Duval lith. Title— Maj'r Peter Fritz | 
National Grays, Philada. Size 11.12 x 12. G ins. 

Henry M. Fuller. 
' Full bust, front face. P. S. Duval, lith. Title— as above. 
Size 4.G x 3.14 ins. 

James Gakuette. 

Half-length, front face. Vanderlyn. pinxt. Title — Your 
very obedient Servant | Jas. Gardctte. Size, 4.P2 x 4.2 ins. 

Francis Xavier Gartlakd. 
Three-quarter length, seated, face { to right. From a 
daguerreotype, P. S. Duval, lith. Title— Right Rev'd Fran- 
cis Xavier G art land | First Bishop of Savannah, Ga. Size 
11.8 x 10.12 ins. 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert Ncicsam. 285 

Kodkkt. Gerry. 
Full Lust, face \ to right. A. Newsam, del. P. S. Duval, 
lith. for Thus. S. Wagners 1L S. Ecelesiastie&l Portrait Gal- 
lery, Philada. litio— Sev'd Bobert Gerry | Pastor of St. 
George's Methodist E'pi|l Gjhureh | Phila. Size, 5.6 x 4.9 
ins. 

E. ^\ r . Gileert. 

Half-length ; face f to right. A. P. Pocky, pinxt. Chikls 
& Lehman" lith, Phila. Title— E. \Y. Gilbert | Pastor of 
Hanover St. Presbyterian. Giiurch j Wilmington, Del. Size, 
6.12 x 6 ins. 

Capt. Gillis. 

Three-quarter length in uniform, standing to front, face 
| to left; right hand on hip, sword in left hand. Title — 
Unlettered proof from Xcwsam Collection, but marked as 
" Capt. Gillis, of Delaware." Size 8.10 x 7.8 ins. 

• Stephen Girard. 
Rectangular, full length, statue, face f to left. From a 
sketch by Leon Xoel after the statue by Gevelot. P. S. 
Duval, lith. Title, as above — Size 5.10 x 3.9 ins. 

Ibid. 

. Same as above, but different size. Size, 7.16 x 5.6 ins. 

Ibid. 
Half-length, seated, face J to left. P. Otis, pinxt., Childs 
& Inman/lith. for John Y. Clark, Phila., 1832. Title- 
Stephen Girard | From the original portrait pointed by Bass 
Otis. Size, 9.14 x 10.1 ins. 



John 1). Godman. 
Full bust, face J to right. II. la in an, pinxt. C. C. 
Childs, direx. Xot signed by Ncweam, bat ascribed to him. 
Title—John P. Godman, JI.D. | Philadelphia. Size— 5 x 4 
ins. 



^ 



286 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Newsdik'. 

W. Gordon. 
Bust on pedestal; face f to left. '. P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. 
Title— Yours truly | "VT. Gordon. Size 4.4 x 2.12 ins. 

Jonx L. Grant. 
Pull bust, faec -J to left. Childs & Iuman, lith. Not 
signed by Xewsam, but ascribed to him. Title — Rev. John 
L. Grant | Pastor of the 11th Presbyterian Church, Phila- 
delphia. Size 5.6 x 4.8 ins. 

Stephen Grellet. 
Oval in tint, full length silhouette, lace profile, to right. 
P. S. Duval, lith. Title—as above. Size, 12.5 x 9.4 ins. 

Robert C. Grier. 
Full- bust, face J to right. From an arnbrotype. P. S. 
Duval, lith., for Jos. M. Wilson. Title— Robt. C. Grier | 
Due West, South Carolina | Moderator of the Associate Re- 
formed Synod of the South, 1858. Size, 5.5 x 4.2 ins. 

Charles Grobe. 
Half-length, front face. P. S. Duval & Son, lith. Title 
— as above. Size 5.14 x 4.8 ins. 

Felix Grundy. 
Full bust, face f to right. W. P>. Cooper, pinxt. Leh- 
man & Duval, lith. Phila. Title. — Signature as above. Size, 

5.7 x 4.12 ins. 

Pevbe.n Haines. 

; Half-length seated, face I to left. J. Wood, pinxt. P. S. 
Duval, lith. Title — Reuben Haines | Originator of the Hose 
Companies of Philadelphia | 1803 | nat. 1785 | ob, 1881. 
Size 8.2 x 7.2 ins. 

F. G. Hallixk. 

Full bust, face \ to right. Childs & Intnan Press, Phila. 
Unsigned by Xewsam, but apparently his work. Title. — 
Signature as above. Size 4 x 4.11 ins. 



mmmmm 



JAthograplde Fortreuts of Albert Neicsam. 287 

Robert Hamilton. 
Full bust, face f to loft. T. Sully, pinxt. . P. S. Duval, 
lith. Title— as above. Size, 9.12 x 9 ins. 

Wai. Henry Harrison. 
Rectangular, half-length in uniform, sword in left hand, 
face | to left. R. Peale, pinxt. Lehman & Duval, lith., 
Phila. Title — General Harrison. Size — 12.7 x 10.4 ins. 

Ibid. 
Half-length, face J to right. T. Sully, pinxt. published 
by W. E. Tucker & Chas. \Y. Bender, Phila. 1841. Title— 
Genl. Wm. II. Harrison | President of the United States | 
Inaugurated March 4th, 1841. Size— 11.4 x 11.4 ins. 

Ibid. 
Rectangular, full bust, face | to left. P. S. Duval, lith. 
Title.— W. II. Harrison. Size G.8 x 3.14 ins. 

James B. Hardenbergh. 
Half-length, face £ to right. A. Ncwsam, del., P. S. Du- 
val, -lith. Title, Jas. B. liardenbergh. Size, 9.8 x 8.2 ins. 

Erskine Hazard. 
Full bust, face slightly to left. From an ambrotype by 
J. Brown, Mauch Chunk; P. S. Duval & Son, lith. Title— 
Yours | Erskine Hazard. Size 4 x 3.14 ins. 

J. P. lv. IIexshaw. 
Half-length in clerical robes ; face y to riirht. " From life 
on stone by A. Xewsam." P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. « Pub- 
lished by request." Title— J. P. K. Henahaw D.D. | Hector 
of Saint Peters Church, Bait. Size 5.8 x 4.14 ins. 

Co X ST.A X T IX ] I E 1 1 1 X G . 

Half length, reading book, face J to right. From a da- 
guerreotype by W. & F. Langenheim. Title — Die milde 
Maeht is <2;ross. I Constantin Herhur. Size, 3 x 3 ins. 



288 Lithographic Portraits of Albdrf 'Newsanu 

George Hmoixs. 
Half-length, face | to left. A. Newsam from life, Tims. 
S. Wagner, publisher,, in U. S. Ecclesiastical Portrait Gal- 
lery. Title — Rev'cl Geo. Higgins. Size, 4.6 x 6 ins. 

Hexky Hill. 
Oval; bust; face J to right. P. S. Duval, Steam lith., 
Pliila. Kote made from a process plate of the original and 
size not known: 

James Hojjan. 

Full. bust; face f to right. Daguerreotype by AYrn. J. 
Corcoran. P. S. Duval, nth. Phila. 1840.* Title.— Signa- 
ture as above | James lloban Esqr. | Late IT. S. Attorney 
for the District of Columbia ] Three lines beneath. Size 
10.12 x 8.12 ins. 

Joseph Hopkinson. 

Bust, face f to left. T. Sully, pinxt., Childs k Inman, 
lith. Not signed by Xewsam, but ascribed to him. Unlet- 
tered proof — Size 5.9 x 5.G ius. 

Ibid. 

Half-length, face f to left. Title— Jos. Hopldnson,LL.D. 

| Late Judge of the XL S. Court for the Eastern District of 

Penna. | President of the Penna. Academy of Pine Arts, 

Vice President of the | American Philosphical Society, etc. 

etc. Size 11 x 8.2 ins. 

AY. B. Ilur.i'.AiU). 
Three-quarter length in Masonic regalia, face front. P. 
S. Duval £ Son, lith. for "Mirror & Keystone," Philada., 
• 1852. Title.— Yours Fraternally | AY. B.Hubbard | M.AV. 
G. M. of the Grand Lodge ^ Ohio. Size 10 x G.10 ins. 



John* Hnan:s. 
Full bust, in robes, face J to right A. Xewsara from life ; 
published by John Kenedy, New York, 1841. Title- S 






Lithographic Portraits of Albert Ncwso.m. 289 

nature | Bight JJcvM John Hughes D.D. | Coadjutor to the 
Bishop of Xew York. Size, 9 x 9.8 ins: 

Mr. Huidekoper. 
Half length, face £ to left J. Xeaglc, pinxt Childs ft 
Inman, lith. From unlettered proof in Kewsara Collection. 
Size 7.8 x 7 ins. 

Hunt. 

Half length, face I to right. A. Xewsam from life. P. S. 

Duval, lith. Title— M Hunt. | Genl. Hunt, | First 

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the | 
Republic of Texas. (Signature obscure.) Size : 11 x 9.8 ins. 

Thomas P. Hunt. 

Half-length, holding a hook entitled " The Drunkard's 
Friend," face f to right. Wm. Ei Winner, pinxt., P. S. 
Duval, lith. Title— Thos. P. Hunt. Size, 9.10 x 8.12 (?) 

George B. Ide. 
Full bust, face slightly to left. A. Newsam, del., P. S. 
Duval, lith., for Thos. S. Wagner. Title.— Pcv'd Geo. B. 
Ide, A.M. | Pastor of the First Baptist Church, Phila. 
Size, 5.4 x 4.2 ins. 

J. P. Ixcersoll. 
Full bust, face § to right. II. Inman, pinxt. Childs & 
Inman, lith. 2sot signed by Xewsam, but it is bis work. 
Title — ^T. T\. Ingersoll | From the original picture painted 
for his students and presented to | the Law Library of Phil- 
adelphia. Size, 8.13 x 8.12 ins. 



(To be continued.) 



VOL. XXIV. — 19 



290 A Letter of the Mother of Wash*', if/ton. 

A LETTER OF THE MOTHER OF WASHINGTON. 

Original in the 'Manuscript Collection of the Historical Society of 

Pennsylvania. 









/ & 



&*§*'$$ 't&iyffafy 



Colonel JJoudlnot's Notes on (hrCkrtd, 177$. 291 



COLONEL ELLAS BOUPIXOT'S XOTKS OF TWO CON- 
FERENCES HELD BY THE AMERICAN AND BRITISH 
COMMISSIONERS TO SETTLE A GENEJiAL CARTEL 
FOE THE EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS OF WAE, 17TS. 

[The exchange of civil and nulifcuy prisoners of war was a matter 
which continued iu a very unsatisfactory state until the appointment by 
Congress in June of 1777 of Elias 'Boudinot, Esq., as Commissary Gen- 
eral of Prisoners. The Historical Society of Pennsylvania in its manu- 
script collection- has much of the correspondence and many notes of 
conferences of Colonel Boudinot on the subject, and we have selected one 
of the latter, for the interesting account it gives of the attempt to settle 
on a general cartel for the exchange of prisoners of war. The American 
Commissioners were Colonel William Grayson, Lieutenant-Colonels Alex- 
ander Hamilton and Robert Hanson Harrison, of Washington's staff, and 
Colonel Elias Boudinot, and the British, Colonel Charles OTlara, of the 
Coldstream Regiment of FoQt Guards, Colonel Humphry Stephens, of the 
Third Regiment of Foot Guards, and Captain the Hon. Richard Fitzpat- 
rick, of the First Regiment of Foot Guards. Their meetings took place 
in theRenezet mansion, on Main street near the Square, Germantown, 
and iu the inn of Amos Strickland, at Newtown, in Bucks County.] 

On Tuesday the 31" March 1778 Col. AV B1 Grayson, Lieut. 
Col. Hob* II. Harrison & Alex* Hamilton and Elias Boudinot 
Commissioners appointed by his Exc 7 Gen. Washington, 
(for meeting Commissioners of like Rank from Gen 1 Howe 
to sett & agree upon a general Cartel for the Exchange o^ 
Prisoners &c.) set out from the Camp at the Valley Forge, and 
proceeded to German Town, and arrived at 11 o'clock in 
the forenoon, where they met Col. Charles O'llora, Col. 
Humphrey Stephens & Capt. Rich* Fitzpatrick, Commission- 
ers from Sir William Jlowe. The Commissioners o]\ each side 
were attended by an Escort of 12 light Dragoons under the 
command of a Cap. of light .Dragoons — Americans by Capt. 
[Robert] Smith of Baylor's reg 6 . 

After the usual Introduction, Col. O'llara mentioned their 
coming with the most upright Intentions of acting with 



292 GAonel BowVn.oCs Notes on the Cartel, 1778. 

« 

Candour & Oneness. That they doubted not of our coming 

with the same resolutions, and that therefore, they hoped for 
a favourable Issue. Col. OMIara presented their Commis- 
sion from Sir William Howe dated the o Ul Inst, for nice tins: 

on the 10 th , whereupon Col. Grayson produced the Commis- 
sion from Gen 1 Washington and Com 3 were examined & ex- 
changed. Col. O'Hara previously observed, that he under- 
stood the two Generals meant the negotiations to proceed 
between the military Gent a and if necessity required to call-in 
Mess 8 Boudinot & Loring for Information occasionally, but 
on seeing that Mr. Boudinot was mentioned in the Commis- 
sion, waived the Matter and proceeded to introduce rough 
Kotes of their Ideas of the principal Parts of a general Cartel, 
leaving them and desiring they might be considered by to- 
morrow. Then proposed their going to Town this Evening, 
& returning bv Ten o'Clock tomorrow Morning. 1 Col. 
Harrison mentioned the necessary attendants passing k 
repassing to the respective Camps under Passes from"' 
each other. Col. O'Hara agreed for this Day & promised to 
obtain proper Authority for the purpose by tomorrow. It 
was mentioned that German Town should be a place of neu- 
trality & no Troops besides the mutual Escorts to enter. 
Col. O'Hara also proposed at the Introduction, that we should 
take up the matter of our Business in the first Place by set- 
tling a general Cartel, to answer the Purposes of our Com- 
missions and afterwards to settle all other disputes as second- 
ary Matters, to which we assented, provided nothing was 
considered as binding on cither Party until the whole was 
settled. 

1 In another communication Colonel Boudinot states: "The British 
Commissioners after dinner told u*, that they had engaged to attend a 
grand Ball that was to be given that evening in the City, ami earnestly 
solicited that we should gratify them by consenting to their g<»iug into 
the City, when they would mention our Objections to their powers and 
they would he out e:irly in the morning. They accordingly went ami I 
suppose reported to Gen. Howe, The next morning, they came out in 
good time. . . In granting this request, we were guilty of a great 
Blunder." 



Colonel BowUnoVs Rotes on (he Cartel 177S. 



203 



Dined altogether at Benezet's; spent the Evening in con- 
sidering the rough .Minutes left with us k preparing our 

Objections for the morning. 

Wcdnmikiy i April 1. — After settling our Minds on the 
rough Notes of n general Cartel, & making the proper 
Notes, we attended at the Place of Meeting, whore after 
waiting an Hour, we were joined by the Commissioners on 
the Part -of Gen 1 Howe. 

After making our Objections to Gen 1 Howe's Commission 
to the Gent n viz. That it did not contain an Averment ot 
Gen 1 Howe's Power and that it was restricted to the 10 th 
March, which was past, we proceeded, (through Col. 
Grayson) to examine the rough Notes Paragraph by Para- 
graph, and after discussing the several propositions sepa- 
rately, we agreed in our general Ideas on the most, material 
of them making Notes thereof. The Gentlemen then pro- 
posed amplifying the rough Notes & reducing them to the 
form of a Cartel before the next meeting, but as this must be 
the work of Time they agreed to adjourn till Friday morning. 

Having finished Business, they informed us that they had 
ree'd orders to acquaint us that it was Gen' Howe's intention 
that as German Town was within 4h miles of their Posts, 
the Truce should be considered to be in force no longer 
than we were actually sitting excepting that when his Coin- 
missioners went off towards Philadelphia every Evening 
we should immediately set oil' towards our Posts, and that 
we should be mutually protected in going & coming. On 
this we immediately demanded to know if these were their 
positive orders from G<.n x Howe, they answered, that how 
ever they might consider this matter themselves, lliat these 
were the orders they had ree'd from S r W* Howe, to which 
we ans d that we should depart to our Camp as soon as pos- 
sible, and that they could not expect our attendance again 
•until a farther Agreement between our GoiiV respecting this 
matter. 

It is to be remembered, that in the Notes we made of our 
agreement of Ideas on the rough Proposition, we went no 



29-1 CJmxd BoitiTuiot's Xofcs on the Cartel, 1778. 

farther than the general Principle of each, which wo agreed 
was to bo mutually modified & enlarged with such restrie- 
lions k Conditions & applied to such purposed as per 

measure to be adopted on our part, as we conceived it to be 
an extraordinary step on their side to start such doubt on so 
clear a point and which had been so fully Beetled by the two 
commanders in chief: k at the same time looking upon it 
as derogatory to the disrnitv of the States, & a reflection 
on our own personal honor. We informed them we should 
set out in the morning to give an account to Gen 1 Wash- 
ington of the reasons which suspended the negotiation. 

April 4-- — Gen 1 Washington having informed us that he 
had ree'd a Letter from Gen 1 Howe on the Subject of our 
negotiation k leaving German Town, in Consequence of 
which he had appointed another Meeting of the Commis- 
sioners at New Town in Bucks County on Monday next, 
which was to be the Place of our residence till the negotia- 
tion was finished, unless an adjournment should take Place 
to any other Place, by mutual Consent, we agreed to set oft 
earlv on Monday Morninsr. 

Monday, April C. — We arrived at New Town about 6 
o'Clock in the afternoon Escorted as before, where we met 
Gen 1 Howe's Commissioners just arrived, with the addition 
of a Commissary & Subaltern otlicer. Lodgings were 
provided for the English Commissioners, k their Escort. 
It appearing that they were unprovided with either Provi- 
sions or Forage, we agreed to make the necessary Provision 
for their Escort, k to keep one Table for the Commis- 
sioners, they having provided Liquors. It was agreed to 
adjourn all Business till to-morrow morning. 

April 7. — The Commissioners met at the house of Mr. 
Strickland, and previous to opening the Business, Col. 
0'IIara informed us, that Sir W" Howe had been made 
acquainted with the objection taken to their Commission, 
when at German Town. That his wish A: desire was to 
treat in the present Business with Gen 1 Washington in the 
personal characters of the two Generals. That however, he 



^ 



Colonel BoudlnoVs Notes on the Cartel, 1778. 205 

thought himself justifiable in exceeding Ins express Powers, 
in negotiating an Exchange frojn the necessity & mutual 
convenience of the measure and would take the risque upon 
himself, yet lie could not think or consent to setting forth 
any Assertion in the Powers or Commission that would 
convey the Idea of a national compact or Agreement, and 
therefore the English Commissioners desired our Considera- 
tion of the question, whether we thought ourselves author- 
ized to treat with them under the Commission as it now 
stands as otherwise they could not proceed in the Business. 
That if we could not think ourselves thus authorized as to 
the Cartel at large, because of such want of Powers, that 
there could he no just Objection to our going into an Ex- 
change of the Prisoners now actually in Possession, as this 
would he merely a personal Business to be executed 
immediately. 

After some altercation on the subject, they proposed to 
adjourn till tomorrow morning, when they would expect 
our final answer. 

April 8. — On meeting this morning we desired the Gent a 
would give us an . answer to a previous Question, viz. 
Whether they considered their Proposition as a positive 
Term on the Compliance to which, we could only proceed 
to Business, or whether they considered it as a point of dis- 
cussion, and therefore that they were ready to hear our 
Arguments on the subject. On a little disputation we in- 
formed them that we considered ourselves as unauthorized 
either to treat under the Idea of representing our General 
in his personal character, or of negotiating partially for the 
exchange of the present Prisoners only. They replied, that 
they considered it at present as a positive preliminary, and 
that none but SirTV* Howe could fully answer the Question 
and authorize them to proceed, and that to settle this Dis- 
pute, two of them Col. O'Uara k Capt. Fitzpatrick would 
immediately go to Philadelphia & take his further Instruc- 
tions on. the subject, and return tomorrow moriuug. To 
this we agreed and adjourned till tomorrow morning. 



296 



Colond BouxUncjVs Notes m the OarteL 1778. 



As tliey chose to take their WTaggon to the City to return 
with some necessaries, a Passport was signed by Col. Grayson 
k Col. Hamilton for the purpose. 

April 0. — The Gent' 1 returning from Philadelphia so late, 
that no Business could be done. 

Apr'd 10. — On meeting this morning Gen 1 Howe's Com- 
missioners informed us, that they were ready to treat with 
us on the Commission as it stood, but it could not be altered. 
Having had a great deal of private confidential conversation 
on the subject, we proposed, that our objections should be 
put into writing, and that they should give us an official 
answer in writing, to prevent mistakes, to which after some 
dispute they consented. We retired, and drew up our ob- 
jections to their Powers (for state of objections see appendix) 
and delivered it to them, which they refused to read, and 
returned hack, alledging that having considered the matter, 
they did not think themselves authorized to give any other 
than a verbal answer. This altercation put oil* the Business 
for this day. 

April 11. — Having corrected k amended our State of 
Objections, we insisted on Gen' Howe's Commissioners re- 
ceiving them, which they did with great difficulty, and in 
the aflernoon returned us a written Paper (see appendix) 
declaring; that it was no answer to our Objections but onlv 
a declaration of their readiness to treat. To this we imme- 
diately prepared a reply, and delivered it to CoL O'Haia, 
who refused to read it, alled&ing that if we could not meet 
them on that Commission the negotiation was at an end, and 

v. 

after keeping it some time, he returned it to us, on which 
Col. Grayson read the Paper aloud to them. They insisted 
that we had gone out of the present Business witb our 
Objections, which ought to have been confmod to their Com- 
mission, in which there was nothing contained relative to 
any thing civil but was altogether military. That the Ex- 
change of Citizens was a ground they never could lUCOl us 
on, as the inhabitants were all their Citizens, and the Terms 
were unequal — and that with regard to tiie publick Faith, if 



Colonel BoudinoCs Notes on the Gcirki, 177S. 297 

we held up Language of that kind it must forever prevent 
any negotiation, as it could not be pledged with People in 
our situation. On this we replied, that Citizens were an 
express object of our negotiation — that they were mentioned 
in the most positive Terms in the Correspondence between 
Gen 1 Washington & Gen 1 Howe, and that if they considered 
thein excluded from their Commission, it was a new Objec- 
tion to the sufficiency of their Powers, which we could never 
give up. That with regard to the publiek Faith, we relied 
on our reasoning upon that subject being conclusive, and 
desired to know officially from them, whether they consid- 
ered their Powers as enabling them to hold the Conference, 
as a personal Treaty between the two Generals only, or 
whether the publiek were also to be concerned in it. They 
answered that they could agree only on a personal Treaty as 
between the two Generals only, and that the publiek faith 
could not be pledged or concerned in the matter, and that 
the Cartel if settled would be binding but during Sir \T ra 
Howe's administration and on him alone. 

In the course of the conversation it was added, that Citi- 
zens were expressly mentioned in our Powers, which being 
interchanged, pointed them out as one object oi^ our nego- 
tiation, that we conceived them to be comprehended in theirs, 
under the general description of Prisoners of War, since we 
know no other light in which Citizens could be made the 
lubjects of Captivity, that Sir W™ Howe in his correspond- 
ence with Gen 1 Washington expressly refers the affairs of 
Citizens to a personal description between the Commission- 
ers, and that their own proposition to us, contained a clause 
respecting Persons in Civil Employment, which we looked 
upon as only the words for Citizens in office. Gen' ITowc's 
Commissioners answered that thev considered the negotia- 
tion as at an and. and therefore to dispute further on the 
Bubject was vain. On this we broke off Business and agreed 
to return tomorrow. 1 

'In a letter of Colonel Boudinot, he writes of the British Commission- 
era : "We were very sociable, but had previously obtained the character 



298 Colonel Jhvdmat'i Xoi's on the Cartd, 177S. 

Appendix Nn. J. 

The Commissioners appointed by his Exc 7 Gen 1 Washinar- 
ton to confer, determined agree upon a Treaty & Convention 
for the exchange of Prisoners of Vox, and for all matters 
whatsoever that may be properly contained therein. 

Having examined the Papers on the part of Gen 1 Sir "W" 
Howe to liis Commissioners and compared them with their 
own, observe a difference, ■ which in their apprehension, is 
very essential and important. 

General Washington in his Commission expressly declared 
it to be £iven in Virtue of full Powers to him delegated. 
Gen 1 Sir W m Howe in his Commission makes no acknowl- 
edgement of any authority by which he acts. 

It appears to be the Intention of the respective Generals, 
mutually expressed in their Powers to do an extensive & per- 
manent Act, which shall not only effect a settlement of past 
differences k a general Exchange of Prisoners for the present, 
but shall extend to the establishment of a regular and ex- 
plicit Cartel in the future. The objects of this Cartel will 
not be wholly of a Military nature, but will include matters 
of very interesting civil concern. It is apprehended that 
the Power of entering into a Treaty of such importance is' 
not naturally inherent in military command, and that it can- 
not be exercised by either of the Generals as an official Act, 
merely in virtue of their military capacities, but must be 
founded on special Authority according to reason & universal 
Practice ought to be declared, otherwise it will not appear nor 
have the least efficiency or operation. That if this authority 
does not exist, the negotiation can have no sufficient founda- 
tion. It must rest solely on the footing of personal Confidence. 
The publk-k faith cannot be considered as pledged for the 

of our opponents, and wen convinced that they depended much on out- 
drinking us. We know that Col. Grayson waa a match for them, and 
therefore left aH that part of the. business to biui . . . Tiny sat down 
often with Grayson while we were preparing to go oftj 'till tiny COtlld 
scarcely sit upright. Ju*t before sundown they were put on their horsed 
and went for the city." 



Chlonel BoudinoCs Notts on the Cartel, 1778. 290 

performance of any engagements in consequence of it, and 
then may of course be overruled at pleasure. 

Could the credit of individuals be supposed great enough, 
in preservation of personal honor^to prevent the interference 
of superior authority, their influence could not at any rate 
•extend beyond their own Command, and should the Caus- 
alities of war remove them, their successors would not be in 
any. manner bound by their engagements. 

In fine it is conceived, there would be a manifest impro- 
priety in conducting a Business of this nature on personal 
ground, as such a measure would be.destitute of that Validity 
which the. solemnity of a publick Act alone can give, and 
which the magnitude of the objects it is intended to com- 
prehend indispensibly requires. Personal confidence or the 
mutual credit of individuals, is too slender k unsubstantial 
a basis for concerns of so great variety & extent as the Treaty 
in contemplation must necessarily involve. 

Xew Town, April 10, 1778. " ' 

Wjllm. GltAYSON, 

Kobt. II. Harrison, 

A. Hamilton, 
Euas Boudinot. 
To Col. Charles O'Hara, 
Col. Humphrey Stevens, 

CAPT. RlCJID. FlTZPATPJCK. 

Appendix No. £?. 

■ The Commissioners appointed by his Exe v Sir W" Howe 
to take into consideration all past transactions relative to the 
Exchange of Prisoners, to adjust the differences that have 
so long subsisted in regard to them, to remove all difficul- 
ties that may arise in carrying into execution a general Ex- 
change of Prisoners with both parties at this time, and finally 
to establish a regular & explicit Cartel for the future. 

Having rec' 1 the objections made to the Commission under 
which they act, from the Commissioners appointed to meet 



300 Colonel Bov.dlnoCs Notes on the G.irtel, 1778. 

. them for similar purposes by General Washington, arc much 
concerned to find they are likely to prove an obstruction to 
the execution of so desirable a purpose they conceive the 
Powers delegated to them bv their Commission to be suih- 
cient and simple for effectually accomplishing the purposes 
therein contained, and hereby declare themselves ready & 
desirous of immediately entering upon a Treaty with the 
. Commissioners appointed by General Washington for carry- 
ing into execution the different objects of their Commission. 
jSTew TowS, April 11, 1778. 

Ciias. G'IIara, 
Hum phy. Stephens, 

KlClIP. FlTZPATRICK. 

To Col. GpvAYson, 
Lt. Col. Harrison, 
Lt. Col. Hamilton, 
Elias Boudinot, Esq. 

Appendix No. 3. 

The Commissioners appointed by his Excellency General 
"Washington to confer, determine & agree upon a Treaty & 
Convention for the exchange of Prisoners of AVar .and for 
all matters whatsoever, that may be properly contained 
therein — 

Are inexpressly concerned to find that the Commissioners on 
the part of Q^n 1 Sir W m Howe should think it necessary to 
make the objections stated in their Powers, and supported 
• as they apprehend, by the most conclusive reason-, an insur- 
mountable obstacle to the progress of a negotiation intended 
to answer the most benevolent and estimable purposes. As 
Gen 1 Sir "W™ Howe, must be supposed fully empowered to 
enter into the Treaty, his commission imports, they can con- 
ceive no sutiicicut reason for not declaring his Powers, and 
would flatter themselves that nothing can be easier than to 
remove the cause of their objections, and to proceed on the 
business on admissible terms. They are ready and solicitous 
to treat on fair, proper & e*jual ground, such as will give 



GAonti BoadinoCs KoUs on the Cartel, 1778. 301 

efficiency to their proceedings and place a publick Act on 

the foundation of publick authority. 
New Town, Ap 1 11, 1778. 

Wm. Grayson, 
Roct. II. Harrison, 
To Col. Cn. O'Hara, Alexr. Hamilton, 

Col. Humph y Stephens, Eltas Boumnot. 

Capt. Eiciid. Eitzpatrick. 

Appendix No. 4. 

[L.S.] By his Exc c ' Geo. Washington Esq r Gen 1 & Com- 
Blander in Chief of the Forces of the United States of 
America. 

To Col. William Grayson, Lieut. Cols. Robert Hanson 
Harrison & Alex r Hamilton and Elias Boudinot Eso/ 
Commissary General of Prisoners. 

AVhereas a proposition was made by me 011 the 30 th day 
of July 17 7G to his Exc 7 Sir W 111 Howe, and acceeded to by 
him on the first day of August following, stipulating an Ex- 
change of Prisoners, officer for officer of equal rank, soldier 
for soldier and Citizen for Citizen. And whereas differ- 
ences have arisen in the construction & execution of this 
Agreement, and it has been found by experience to be 
inadequate to all the desirable purposes for which it was in- 
tended, not being sufficiently extensive & definite to compre- 
hend the diversity of circumstances incident to the State of 
Captivity, or to ascertain the various modes of relief 
applicable to all. 

In order to adjust all snch differences, to prevent others 
in future, so far as may be practicable, and to tix the Ex- 
change and accommodation of Prisoners of War, upon a 
more certain, liberal & ample foundation, you are in virtue 
of full Powers to me delegated, to meet such Commis- 
sioners of suitable rank as are or shall be appointed on the 
part of Gen 1 Sir \V m Howe, and who shall come duly author- 
ized to treat on the subject at German Town 0:1 the SI* day 



302 Cvhnd BoudinofB Notes on tkiCartd, 177S. 

of March Pnst. r with thonvto confer, determine k agree upon 
a Treaty k Convention for the Exchange of Prisoners of 
"War, and for all matters whatsoever which may be properly 
contained therein, on principles of Justice, Humanity & 
mutual advantage, and agreeable to the customary rules k 
practices of War among Civilized Nations, For all which 
this shall he your sufficient Warrant and your engagements 
being mutually interchanged shall be ratified and confirmed 
bv me. 

Given under ray Hand & Seal at Head Quarters at Valley 
Forge this — day of March 1778. 

Go. Washington. 

By his Exc J3 Command, 
John Laurexs, A.D.C. 

Appendix No. 5. 

By his Exc y Sir "William Howe, Knight of the most 
Hon* 18 Order of the Bath, Gen 1 & Commander in Chief of all 
his Majesties Forces within the Colonies laying on the 
Atlantic Ocean from Nova Scotia to West Florida inclusive, 

&C, cY.C. 

To Col. Charles O'JIaka, 
Col. Humphry Stephens, 
Capt. Bici'ii). Fitzpatrick. 

In pursuance of an Agreement entered into with Gen. 
Washington for the Appointment of Commissioners on his 
Part and on mine to meet at German Town on Tuesday the 
10 th day of March 177S with full .Powers to take under their 
consideration all past Transactions relative to the Exchange 
of Prisoners, to adjust the differences which have so long 
suhsisted in regard to them, to remove all difficulties that 
may arise in carrying into Execution a general Exchange of 
the Prisoners of, both Parties at this time, and finally to 
establish a regular & explicit Cartel for the future — 

I do hereby nominate & appoint you Col. Charles O'Hara, 
Col. Humphry Stephens & Captain Uich* Fitzpatrick Com- 



GAonel Bov.diiLoVs jVufcs on the Cartel, 1778. 303 

inissioners on my part for the purpose af 3 ' 1 , and you or any 
two of you are accordingly to repair to German Town on 
the Day abovementioned and there to treat, determine k 
agree with a like number of Commissioners of suitable 
rank on the part of Gen 1 Washington vested with similar 
Powers to those herein contained, upon all Matters whatso- 
ever relative to Prisoners. For all which this shall be to 
you Col. Charles O'Hara, Col. Humphry Stephens k Cap* 
Pich d Fitz'patrick or to any two of you a sufficient "Warrant, 
and your Engagements so concluded upon, will upon condi- 
tion of their being mutually interchanged be finally ratified 
k Confirmed on my part. 

Given under my Hand k Seal at Head Quarters at 
Philadelphia the 5 th day of March 1<7S. 

. Wm. Howe. [L.S.] 
By his Exc- TS Command 

Robt. Mackenzie, Sec- V . 

(Appendix.) 

Copy of rough Propositions made by Gon 1 Howe's Com- 
missioners for Consideration, with our answers. 

A General Exchange of Prisoners to take place Agreed, 
according to the following form viz. officer for 
officer, soldier for soldier, as far as number and 
rank will apply. 

In Case there should nut be an equality in the Agreed to tie 

rank of Officers to be exchanged alternative. 

Lt. General equal to 1 Major Gen 1 k 1 Brig" thc principle 

Gen 1 — or to one Brig r Gen 1 k two Colonels. thro" out thus 

Major Gen 1 equal to 1 Brig' Gen 1 k 1 Col., or Ensign i 

to 1 Col k two V Cols. "«" ; 

Cap' 3 

]>rig r Gen 1 equal to 1 Col. & 1 L* Col., or to M*jor. . . . b 

1 L l Col. k 2 Majors. {£?*; •; ; ;,J 

Colonel equal to 1 L' Col. k 1 Major, or to 1 J* • • • - l 
1 v ' Maj Gw . .:>» 

Major k two Captains l« q«« . . .m 

1/ Col. equal to 1 Major &. 1 Captain, or to 3 ***■■ ' ' S9 
Captains. 



Major Gen 1 


a 


750 


a 


Br*i£r r Gen 1 


a 


375 


u 


Colonel 


a 


187 


a 


1/ Col. 


a 


93 


a 


Major 


a 


4G 


a 


Captain 


a 


23 


a 


Subaltern 


a 


12 


a 


Serjeant 


a 


3 


a 



30-1 GJ.ond Boitdinot's Notes on tlui Quid, 177S. 

Major equal to 2 Captains or 4 Subalterns. 

Captain equal to 2 Subalterns. 

In Case it should at any Time, from a defi- 
ciency of Officers, be found necessary to exchange 
them for men the following propositions are sub- 
mitted to consideration. 
The ratio of 1/ Gen 1 equal to 1500 rank & file 

this calcula- 
tion to be 
governed by 
the preceed- 
icg, and the 
value of on 
Ensign in pri- 
vates to be 
c o n s i d ered 
hereafter. 



In Case it should be found expedient to stipu- 
late a certain Rate of Exchange to be paid in 
considcra* ^oney f° r Prisoners, when there happens to be 
tion. no Prisoners on one side to return, — proposed 
that each man not disabled by wounds or other- 
wise from bearing arms, be rated at Sterl- 
ing, and the Ransom for Officers to be appor- 
tioned accordingly, agreeable to the foregoing 
Proposition. 
The gen' idea Commissioned Officers to be treated with re- 

to be adopted , _ ^. _ 

with a more spect ;& admit tcci to such Liberty upon Parole, as 
eii'.arved ex- t j e na t ure f the situation may permit 

plnnative. J l 

Agreed to the Military Officers acting upon the Staff to be 
pie & those considered only according to their Ranks in the 
who have no respective Armies. 

rank to K 1 ■ . . 

provided for. Persons in civil Employment to be exchanged 

T tion To'" be ior * ne * r ^i 11 ^ or Otherwise as may be agreed 

more fully upon at tlie time o^ Exchange. 

explained. T . . . , V , . . -, , 

Agreed to £ to Deserters not to be included in the C artel. 

bedefined Prisoners in general to be exchanged as soon 

Agreed to «£• the ° 

time to be after Capture, as circumstances may admit. 
fi A-rced. Returns ot^ Prisoners and the Places of their 



G>hnd BoudimCs Notes on ihe Cartel, 1778. 306 

Confinement to be transmitted by the respective 
Commissaries to each other on the l' : day of 
every month specifying the Causalities since the 
proceeding return. 

Permission to be given by both Parties for the Agreed iu Bid 

-, /• t>' " 2 i xi • Q* their ra- 

purcha.se oi 1 -revisions, and small necessaries at thKli 

the market prices, under _ proper 

Clothing & Money to be supply ed by each Each party to 

Party, to their respective Troops," and ' passports Jj^ * ™£ 

to be given according!}'. clothing & 

Surgeons with Medicines to visit their Pris- their prison- 

oners in their different Stations, at stated periods eis * J 

1 Agreed upon 

& upon previous notice. . proper re- 

Hospitals — regulations for them. The protec- ^eed_ta he 
tion of the sick & wounded, and those attending explained. 
upon. them, to be considered by the Commis- 
sioners. 

Provisions — The quantity, quality & price of Agreed. 
the Ration p day to be ascertained as well as the 
maimer of supply k the mode of payment 

Accounts to be settled bv Commissioners at , . 

Agreed. 

stated periods and the balances to be paid ac- 
cordingly. 

The troops now in Captivity & such as may be A , :roea _ to ^ 
taken before these Articles are void by mutual further ex- 

iii n plained. 

consent, are to be exchanged bona tide agreeable 
to them. 



vol. Xxiv. — 20 



306 The First German Newspaper Published in America. 



THE FIRST GEMiAN NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IX 

AMERICA. 

The first newspaper printed in the German language in 
America, was the Philadelpldsehe Zcitimg x published by Ben- 
jamin Franklin in the year 1732. The Pennsylvania Gazelle 
for June 8 to June 15, 1732, contains the folio-wing an- 
nouncement : 

c fht G37.cite will come cut again en Monday jicxt t and ccr.ti- 
Tiue to bepihU(bed en Mondays. 

Jkn\ on tfe Saturday following ivill he fuBU/ted Piiiladelphi- 
fchc Zeitun*, c? NtWJp^er in High- hutch, which will con- 
tinue to be p. (blip ed en Saturdays ovce a Fbrt&igbi 3 ready io bo 
delivered at Ten a Clock, to Ccuriry Sulfcribcrs. Advcrvifo 
ments are takm in by the Printer frrecf, or by Mr, LcuisTiruo- 
thee, Language A'ajrer, who tmrjlates them. 

In undertaking this new enterprise Franklin expected to 
secure a liberal support from the German population of the 
Province, for whom he had been doing considerable printing, 
but in this be was disappointed, and the publication of the 
Zeilung was discontinued after a few numbers had been 
issued. 

The Zeilung was a small sheet of four pages six and a half 
by nine inches, the text printed in double columns with 
Roman type, and at the bottom of the fourth page bore the 
imprint, Philadelphia : Gedruekt bey B. FfimcMm in cter 
Marck-strassc, wo diesc Zeitungvn vor 5 Shillinge des Jahrs 
zu bekommen, und Advoriissementczu bostcllen sind. The 
first number was issued June 10, 1732, and the second, 
" Sonnabend den 2-1 Jivn, 1732.'' (A facsimile of the latter 
is herewith presented.) The publication of the Zcitung 
therefore, antedates. by .-even yeara the Hock-Ikutsch ZVmt- 
sylcanische Geschicht-^Schmber^ published by Christopher Saur. 

Iu the editorial of Xo. 2 two important announcements 
are- made; that not over fifty subscribers had been so- 
cured to support the enterprise, and that in deference to 



«M ( No. II. ) > 



1 






■e 



I 



r 1 



7 



L lllictUwIpilliCiiO 




tl 



b^L X \l 



i 



SON N ABEN D, den a 4 Jun. 175 




lEwohl ich geglaubec nacie, daft 

fieri unter denen teurfchen Ein- 

wohncm dielcs Landes mehr Licb- 

haber fohco gefuuden habcri, die 

diefes zumahl vor junge Pcrfohnen 

riCttliche v/erck, die ausgsbe dcr ^citungen 

rhr.il ich, befordern, und' dazu rnit anfteben 

fndm ; fc erfireckcr fich doch die anzah! de- 

r die fich daz.u unterfchricben haben vox jetzo 

scht rber 50. Nichis defto weni^er babe auf 

cinerfdten nicht crrnangcln woll.cn damtr ci- 

en unf?ng 2ii machen/ der horfnung lebende, 

afsfsch nocb mehrere einfinderi werden felbi- 

fcs Jtubcfo'rdem , fonften ich mien ^eaorhigct 

urn wurde ,■ bald wicder damit auf zu horen. 

Ich hatte ?*var in mciner erllen Zrcitung ver- 

iroclicn dicfdbeallc S- ta<*e zu pub!iciien,doch 

ic rneiiren ftinimen habeuervt unlet diefelbc lie* 



zugefar.de ; nachdem feihigevon dcmGrof- Vi- 
zier denen andem Minifictti in dem Seraglio iil 
communicirct warden, hat'manfie in cir.un ge- 
neral Qivan, velcher am is. dic(e> mouaths en 
dem ende cxpres-irt gchalren wordcii, gclclcn, 
und rur wenige verandemngen daiingcmacitr, 
Man &gf dais verrr.oge dielcs TnrGfcts dci : j joC- 
le Sultan verprliehtec iVy, aiiledlcycn Pcificn 
crobene Pfovintzicn wiederum zu geben, rtfcge- 
nommen Georgia und die site Provint/. roil iia- 
biionicji : Diigeftan foik clem Printzert tficder 
cingeniumeT werden , dcr deficn Souvrraiira 
Hen ei gent Itch iil, und welchcr alhierfcbonan- 
derilnlb Jahr urn diefc rcftirurion angcfc&ltcn: 
Dais die zwey dutch aiefen Priedcn vcicitiigrc 
Machten ihre krhtfrc zaf-.mmen fpaiip.in (<j])cn, 
die Mofcowiter z.u z'-ringch ailes was Gc ■•"«:: 1 Per- 
ilen genommrn habeti , aucfa vrjcdei zu (rcbcri ; 



er vor 5. Schillingc das gantze Jahr alle. 14. doch d.if> fiedisfalstu kcinet tbatlicbkcil kotn- 
ige i-inmahl zu haben ; weilen alsdann fLiglj- men follcti , .biG fie vorhcia allc: mutel dec nn- 
hei zwey und'zwey eJne zeitung haken^ und tcihaudiung ; verfuebet iir.ben , ha tail <\ic Cl.1- 
*dc pcrfon ^emachiicher die hclffre bezahkn rfn abet folchcs weigern Coke^ he ihrc wuftcn 
:flnte; Welches ioh mirdann auch gcfaUcn laf- nicli't nLederlcpen vollcn. bifs ailc die Lannec 
i\.und felbige von nun an allc 14. tage cinmal 
iciaus peben will. Die Anfprachc des Konigcs 
oh Mngiand, v.clcheic-'iin nicincrn vorigen vcr- 
j'lochcn, v/cil fie allzn.i-ing, und ich einjn nn- 
lrrn vorrath von Neuigkciten bekommen, liabe 
icber woUeDau!>]aiTcn, wic ich auch \\m dci ur- 
flcjicn villcn meine etklahrunpjen, die wohl .11- 
per tinige fachen norhi*; gewefen waren, licbrr 
piufcineanderc gelegenhck vcrfpahre, und jjur 
-ic brieffe ••■on vort./.u wort jet/omirtheiie, 
Ccnftt'Tit'tycicl Dectmb. \y 

HKt ift ein Courier arrgckomtr.en*, niic dcr 
Copey.eines Fiiedens-Ttaclacs, wclchew 
dcrjvoni^ Y0U PciTicn dem B^fla in IJubilonicn 



nicht ntederlegen vollcn. 

wicdet croberc ll*yn. Was cine jede von dicicn 

fcwejen Machren w2hrcnden die'ietn Krtcge er- 

obcru wcrde,- folic dcrfclbcn vern'eiben. 

Wcitcrs v.iid v>etiichetT v cU!<dcc Gruf^ \ \ust 

gewiffen fremden Mtni^ercj ein Wcmotial ha: 

l:»nVncinf.andigeii,Nvor:r.ri(.n errrachtc: die noth- 

wcndij»ke!t ?.u behaupttn, dafsman fic!>dcrall- 

zu groilcn Anwachfung d^r Molcowiulchcn 

rnaclie emgegen C-.ii.c; and von wajfitfl*Tcms»e- 

wicht cs'vor d^i Orso»nanni(che Keich Icjr, i!ic- 

feiben von dcr GvfpifcheM Sec m vcttccibe*. 

E$ wecdeci rcrfchicdcac Kciegs-Schitlc vom w- 

ftenund rweyien rang gcb^uct, u.ivi grcik >•»•«- 

raniacn von gefchuu und musd p*Qv*»io« 

tench" 



freric:hrct : A'Jcb hat fclne Hcbcit an die Baf« 
Us der bee Provinttien ordre gefandr, «hm cine 



Rcrlrn Januar. r. 



j geuilfc anzabl Matrofcn unci. Traufport-Schmc 
i zu furnircn. Dcr grotfc Sultan hat ficfi nun 
i ; roonuth If r.£ in feincm Scrrail fehr vcrbor^cn; 

baleen, und lift fich fchr lelrcn von fcniCTfi vol 
| ckc und Txouppen fchen, welches einige gelc-- 
I genhek zumurmuriren inner ihnca giebr. 
Florence Fcbruar. 2. 
Wir vcrnehmcri von Cdrfica, daft dieRcbcl- 
lcn, rucli dem vorthcil velchen He cu Calmiauo 
ttcv.onnen harren.dcn Flecken Bi^ugli^rvitfae bey 
);>aftia,mu folchcm rnurh angcgrnlen baben,d3<~» 
fie denen Soldaren, fo dutch die roauren auf fie 
gefcucrr, die Fiintcn aus den hiiriden genora~ 
mcn. In dem erften anfali bem&chrigien lie fich 
cincs Paftcns v.orinncn tin Corporal u: i<$ Mann 
war, fie wurden abec von dem Ca pffa info in dem 
Flecken mit 150 maim comroandireie,vvicde?zi3- 
luck gcrricbcn,doch (oitenfie fich. noch Mcifter 
dicCcs orts gemacht heben. in weltinn ftVichon 
an zuey unterfchiedlxchen ortcn einen cingang 
gewonnen hattcn,u'cun rcchcacrCoIotici Wach- 
tendonck cincn fuccours von 4.00 Mann gef.mdt 
und fcJbfr mit 1000 Minn gcfolger w are, ihnen 
den pafs ab zu fc'hnciden, vclches fie dennoch 
vorgekommen, und in ihrc gebtirge, welchc for- 
tificiret, und fa ft vor inuiocrwiV.dlich gchalten 
wcidcn,t*ich bey zcitcn rerixker h3tten. Sie dre~ 
lien in kwtscn einenneuen anfali auf Baltiaund 
St. Fiorent£ z'u unrernehrnen. 

Wkn J.nuar. 12. 

JEs wcrden zukutaffrige woehe crliche Dolo- 
res und Baibicrcr n.icb den Turckifchen Gi'(n- 
tz.cn gefchicker, die uusbreirung dcr eotiragion 
und anlleckcnden fetiche in bichenbftrgen, allwo 
bercits einige D&3cr irificitet find., zu vcrhin- 
pqkin. D<r Graf "von Levoidi, General lieutenant 
<ier Czarifcheo Armce , wcicher hier unter dfetn 
thul eines NJ. nutters der be fay, ten Keyfc;in -r-n.^c- 
Koinincn ifl, hat drey privajt Audxcnrzen beym 
Keyfer gchabt, unJ ihm die aufdem taper fcy- 
ende Hey rath des Kronprtntzm vonPreuffen nut 
dcr Print;:ciYin von Mecklenburg , Tochcei des 
Heit^ogs diefes namens, bekandt gemacht, 
IFierK Februar, 

llier v.ird untevfchiedentUch gefprochen von 
dem neucn Eydc welchen ciic unterthanen dcr 
Gurin von Mofcauliabea nvailen abtegen, den- 
jenigen vor den rcchtn-)adigen Autfolger- ?.ur 
Krone z.u eikeunen, v.elehen die Oariti darn in 
if'rem Tcftamente bencnoen loll. Durchgchendi 
f^l.iubet man dais die wahl v.ol aufdie Pfintxcf 
(in von Mecklenburg, die dco iS Deeemb.i " t8. 
^cbolircn ift , unci hch nun vcihcyraihcn will, 
Mien dSidrc. 



4tcr t m jnnuar. 1. 

sfc ^ D/clen morgen gicng dst Xonlg nach I 

le dam, die ankunif: do Hcrtsogen ven Lt> I 

3. pn alda abii>H4rten. Die Koiiigin mit 1 

B» iVinrtcHcn Cb«t lorta und SotHiia iollec 



pey <icrfi isoo^c fjchabi, weiciK-r lie lei 
reich empUngcsi tr.id ibiicn ire L\ , 
ret hatjdebey aucn ireriprochcn ii\n.r, I .... 
anderc groflc. epwhciic zu t^ebcrv, i .. t'JA - 
von. ihten briidcfrn nc'i in leinem rririrciro .vci- 
ten niederluOen. Le. Konr^.j'elu beuielu 
['.tn in fcyn v.egcn des elcndcs/bdiele *m ! : . 
re cler Religion wegen auiftehen, aac!: Ln ihrc 
feftigkeic und beleandi^keic un*er (btcbcm dtock 
nicht gendgfirn be^mtderi v. e.rirn. 

In diefer Snrdt uud VuilJAdten find imver* i- 
rhenen Jahre S41. paar eheljch zulV. 
geben, 3054. kinder beydeHeyjgc(chlechi 
336. Hurktnder geboh»cn, und '5153 rnaanet, 
v\eibei und kinder geUorbcn. 

JFrafiekfttH Janoar. 6. 
Mir leir.:en briefen ven Berlin h«<: man, d. ; > 
JerKonir; aus loblicben cttrei vor die ■ 
foJgreu Salr^burgcr, die 7 wcy Deooriectc 1 
nach Berlin gekonnncn »einc voripfjche * .': 
re gefaneene Mr.bnuder tu eifucben, d 
Confiflonal RathKetnbeck und emen .::.« Ic 
ruhmten der Augsbnrgifchen Confe^fion 1 
thanen Predtgcr, ibre> Glaubens-bekani 
halben hat examintren laflcn, au^ dcrcn 
critelic-r, dais fie weder Arianer,Schul r-er . 
IJnthuibften i'evr.^ vie ihrc frinde d 
von ihncn ausfrrcuc:; fie verhafi z.u nucfai 
fie der jaV>mctiichei> FwyKeit «ni< ihren ^ - ' 
lar.de Zu Ziehen , damit fie t!ue Religion atn - 
vvcrrs ausu'ben mochrcn, r.u benoihed. 
Fratcfrfurt [3nUir. \ 4. 
Von Regen>burg venttmi man, dais t*ei I 
fii.ll von Beycin cndlirb dt ...■• vent 
Saltzomgeru cine fieyc PatTige duteh fe 
vergonner, auch fogarii* gc^elen, d.«fi ti 
f<? bennrhiget zn fey;i I ? Ocu^ 

tser KutlatTen auMheilen, »es> 
gelifchen 5>»an< b : r: 1 fin I *etr rl 
gungs-fchrirli an grd'chtcn C 
(lei Ion, Befagte 'N mu'u- haben mfs .- ■ 
conference gchalten, ia ^elchei reft 
den an den Minittci win S •■ j ' ~ t 
v.-erti;,;e< Mnvoii.J : v. . 

anzuvircn , da .;..;::. 



\ 






\ 



rccaftcn April zut ?.brci& der ein£e(cflencn Pro* 
uirimen in Sakiburg uicJn gcnugOm ley, Und 
iTli> *!-'r VVcftphaJifche Frieaceine zci: von clicy 
/'u.-n jVctc; dafs derO'ACgen die Pfinttcu'vrtii 
Lttebnrg kcinemacht habendie Reichs-Confri- 
l>j:ifniei an anderi^ohnc zuftimmtnig dersmd'ern 
t t( .;;. : i. Wir habcii alhitr luchriciu , dsfi den 
i.f dtcfrs die Eib P/inf^ellin ven fcadcn-Dur- 
ItJi ciiicn Sphn fcizr welt ;;ebiaciir. 
'ffiim&urfc Feoruar. i. 

erftcht, dofs'der legic- 
eubunr die Crchoiifchc 



Ks gcher cin gemeii 



rende Hcrttdg von Mec 



BrJip 



icn anxun 



brirri- von Berlin beriebcen, dais der K>onpiln:£ 
von Pieuflen, -nacbdem man vielc bcrrdangen 
da;ti gebraucher, endjich rciblvirer iit'ditfjuri^e 
Ftttrifccfitn von Mecklenburg fcnr Gemahiin zu 
r/jluv.ct:, fend d*:is 6\c fuctcMron des Uufuichen 
Rcidi.s, ia anfehung deilen, v;o! anf icine K£- 
t ill. Hobeit moehte fen* jreftciier wtfden. 



ni 



sjmf'.trdzm Fcbfuar. "A 



Man fchreiber aus dem Haag, dais der F;an- 
tzofifchc Ambafliideur, Mafcnits'de Feneton den 
5 dicles erne 4<mge corifcrcrit mit cinij;en Her- 
ren von der Regierung gchabt , woraqF den 4. 
cin enn^refi von frcrr.den Miiiifrcrn we^cn aus- 
Ciordenrlichen afhii.en i!t gehalren wordcn.Von 
Vcnedig v;ird geme'der, dafV die aus'Sndiiche 
proteftki niche KauCHctrthe ailda .{blchfcrgeftalt 
duich das clend. der Sahcburger find bewogen 
v.oidcn, dais lie fine collects gsthan, und 600. 
Gulden nach Augsburg tibermachet haben. Wir 
bahen jtfng.fthin alhier einen groifen Srurmuind 
gchabt, vclcher viclen fchaden gechan, und un- 
rcr ; ndern das d<ich ernes hanfes neben dem'Fran- 
tfcofchen Coffee haufe abgeworften, wodurch ;. 
tnenfehen , unter welchcn cin Vaier und fohn, 
zer/chrncttcrt find : Des fnlgenden'tages ift das 
v.affcr holier ah jcruahls bey mciifchen gcden- 
tken gewefen, welches wofcrnees nicht vor der 
zuulckknnrTr der Fiuth gefalien wire, die dam- 
me folte^ durchhrochen und das j*rcPic rheil des 
tondes ibltc (ibertchwemmer haben. Vicr gela- 
druffcbiHc find in didbm fturm z\\ gtur.de ^c- 
gangen, und 2 rr.enSr.he-n vcTtmncken.. 
Hr.jy Feb r u'ar. 19. 
DriefTe von VVicn n.clden , dafs. an d.i^em 
bote ins geheim J r ,eii:sndeic Wird -. neue Cbur- 
fiiiftcnthisnlcr aufiu richte.i, cines vor den Her- 
xr. % von Loiluingen*, und 6?s andere ver den 
Konij^vor. Scbweden, -jIs LHaderaH'en von E Jet- 
' fen CatTel, d.iis dadurch J^^ ^Iei"cb«cvvicht ^'i- 
fchen tjew Proreiranrrn und Cirholirchenif»dern 
ChuifififtHchcn Colle-io rr.o^c be^ahrer wer- 
dcn. Utui diefes, 1 act man. I«v die voHichmfi 



Alliens tcv,' i'arnculitre zeuru 



Lothungcn, welcfcertwcli Franekracfi.KngTccd 

undrfen vomelwr.flcn Hosiciiin Tc n 

ne reiie ^etbdnjfich an eiui^en ncifc'.bcn Co ! i - 

pc Btlfgciulcra. D:c pl"rv.!.c::c : 

Kitnrgs von Ptolm in feme Bibiacdc fri 
rn^n der (chr r/.o^Vn genetgtheii -/u, die • 
die Piinr^cffin von Hclflcin, vot dicil-m G 
vonOj^els!: 1, und naturlfchc tochrer dc r , K 
aile^eit gei:abt bat ur.d uach h^gct, un i c ; . 
hat uolim gegenvarri* fey n .hey ihrcr r 
kuntl't: Doc!> andcrc vermuthen mit mehi 
febcinlichkeir, dais d:',Tc zuffickreilc ein< r i - 



!». r\- 



dieP 



:cy d;.. K onigi J : 
in Polen zu grofi gcuoidcn, hey au mclfci 
ja To fern, dais da die affaire der fuccelfion zur 
Pciniichen Krone lctz:!icl\ aufs r^pci gcbi 
vvur.-ie, man jemsnd in vollerVeitammiungsms- 
rtjjfen h'orere : Kcinw Cluffitrjfhchat Prhmm tu^i 
Sure JTer.Dicfzs find aawCrc&ingcfi der pranrzo- 
filclicrn Louis d'i.-r^-Aciche nicht karclich ontci 
die Gro*fe:i in Polen aa^gdlrcu'i find I 
ck'tren v.iil nan ^erftcheTtt, daft die Reiie des 
K&nigsfMch VVarfchsu auf den iC. dicl: 
i;a'h> fc«.gefteiiei ley. 

Men pj.^ubec hier ddrchgenendi > d.-fs fich 
FraneU*eich emfclieh *om ki iege r fide, m 
Otromamiifehe Pfoitc vcrpftichtct habe, Hch r.e- 
gen einige Chriftliche Potentaten 7.u dec*ai 
und in-\ {.ill cs ?u etnev n!'3iu r kommer ir 
cine dive rilon zu macben Desvregen 2^ch dw 
ICeylerlicKen Trouppcn r.iclu venTimdert, 1 
wioman fich in den Kayfc:iichen Landen Rati- 
ret bar, die Taxenund f mp'«ften e» leichteti »Of« 
dcrn , fondem cs v.crdeji vieimehi diefelbe z\i 
iva(!er und iand , dem )ct?.t di^ais r.cp- 
entwurfao folge vctmshret; und fact rr... 
in jedcr Compagnie iu fufs und pfirid 5 1 
i")!!c!> h in in gefiiget wetdeo, welches re- :*» 
'keine kieine cn/ahl lu^m^chen wi»d \uch hat 
rpan nacbdebr, dirts der KCni« vor P 
Maiiamverdcrj* Landsberg an der Wi 
<lr:rr. Ocftcm :«!i^.\li rv:«; r ier , eine / 
45000. mann an lormiren, ur.d vetlchiedrne Ke- 
HinenteT hach den Liftl 

dilclun C7ianurn .i!»,t. Hf;h::vn ; Oil 

Grofs-Mei(rei .wm M.dtb» Inr cttcubtr I 
lusgclcliieket, alle aym Mah^fei Older ■ - 
ric^c lliircr acfiufordem, , J .' r !n« 

ii'l cintkikn, und bereh fe\n f«Uen i\ 



uifacb 



waiuw UcU cci 



Hexuo^ wn 



oerrunircn, im tall die Tiltckcn, reU 
r. 11 iltuotren iui ^v•• > : macben, uick 
quiren mochtea 

[Y.c Keyterin *mi Nfnicau ifl dm *6 J 

FetrrvSur: i:. v \'>r""- • ii, 1:. .1 ii «' « : v :i I 

l.'.; 1 I " 

grwlf^ 1 *chi tcliiitcn, Sm fol 



4cKc vc*i Mtfciu cmonYraftaat mitdemHomx- 
Mfchen Kcyfer gcrcichnet habcn, dicfesinnhaite: 
KXffs im t.ili cr.ctfcdcr dcr Kcyisr cder Mofcau 
fjven dem. Yorck*n foitc atta^uiret wcrden, dann 
wlc Cxtfiu mU cine* Ancee von icdaoa nuim 
fan. den grants en von rjcr Ukrsinc folrc agiren, 
bud dcr Key fee miteiaer Ajcmsc an dea grantz.cn 
hrou V\ r ailacUicii. 

JPrfri* Mart. '2.6. 

Am Ycrv.*cbcnen Sonntage nacbinittag onge- 

Nelir eiue vlcrcsi P.unde vor f»i«f Uhf, wurde die 

Koni^in in Kcanckrtich gl'ucklich von *eincr 

fpunrccfiiu erlofct. Dcr KoViij- warden 4-Febr. 

2i. Jahr ait, und hat nun zv.cy Suhne und vier 

Tochter UuPer Mori" hit ordre gegeben', die 

susr&lung dcr 12. Kriegsfchiife zu Breir. und 

■Toulon lb viel imraw mftgiiuh zu befebkuni- 

gen, wclche ' beftimmet find , wie vorgegeben 

ivid , von d««sn zu Airier fetisfaSidn zu for- 

dcrn vegen dcs'Fricdenvbiuches. 

PHILADELPHIA Jan. 23. 

JMIr dem JersrcrrSchirl von London, Capf. 

Reeves, hat 0^1 bier die nachrichr bekemmeo, 

daft unfer Proprietor vci der Abreifc be&gscu 

ScmrTs mi: einsm Capirain in London acccrdi- 

ich vcrbunricu habc den culen 



dicfem zu folgt erfebtenen, unJ vc^en 1 
untcifchicdcneii Bcfchuldigungen cicj Mo 
von dcr gsollcn Juy diclCI County cc:- 
gefundcu, exumiutrej word/en, ur.d iucb c..-' 
6 Stundcu bng ^cwiuctcri WortwccJi i 
klcine Juiy .thi unheal gefehwind eiobr 
als unlchuldig van dcr cfften anklagc, u:.d 'fee- 
nigminurcaThemach clu rkiehej iregen < 
dem bcfchuldigung. N'i>. Bs wnrdc bey dci 
-cxarninirung obfeivtret, difs daseiend (bdi I ■. 



PsfTagieren i>c^c 



lie!-.: 



.'Oil c::.'. r gCfcll . - 
fuchiigen begietdc des Capttainj , odef \< 
lichen Intention die RcUc ua vetU'ngesa h 
kornmen , fondem die lati"C dcifelben 1 . r. 



wjc aa.s dem Tag-regifter des Capitains, n:ul dm 



Evdlichcn ausiag 

vv 



M 



ttroien cm 



--:•- 



eicdvi 



ret, und flcn v^rbunaou nape Gen curen i>icy 
lin bord des Schifres zu feyn , uiid fcine Heiib 
nucb Pconlylvanien an^n ue:cn ,'fo dais.u.lbl- 
^c.'.nunmrhro mit dem erllcn SchifTe tilglich er- 
tzru-.l vvird 

In eincr Gazette. von-Boll on vom 29.-Msy.ift 
'o.Vendes AdvertiiTernent publlcirerworden,wo- 
ri'Ls man fehen k.m, dais die 5. arrcitkte Per • 
iulinen dbel genng .daran find > und viellticbt 
ii^ch, nach To vieiem ausgeiranicnenelend, dns 
^elach werden beiahlen muiTeu > Co ficb inrer 
iiicmind annirorot. 

Nachdem nuf anftifftuhg und eirtgebung ver* 
irbiedener Pcrfohnen, welche den Kapitaiu des 
bchifTs Licbe und Einigkeit, Jacob Lobb, mit 
j;io;V?r Desbarey gegen gewfift Pfalacrin feinem 
Mcbirie, aufihrec Pafiage von Holland xu Mar- 
iha's Vineyard, belegct biben , die Ehrfame 
'Kiehter dci Koniglicbcn Obergcrichw gut pe- 
fund.'u haben, dsn(e»bcn zu verpliichten daiscr 
v«)i dem Obergerichtc von Rcchts-Lichcn , ^cc. 
' welches <lcn vicrdtcn Dienftag iin Mert« Ictsit- 
Jiin ?.u Barnftable vordieCnunry von Barnftable 
gehrthen worden, crfchcincn , und dabjentge Co 
ven des Konigs wcgen gegen iha eingebr .c\u 
werden mochte, bcar.tworJen folic ; <\i ei dan'n 



1 p .. 


. u 




■ 


Mclbi 





* ML A D E L C P HI A: Gcdrucki 
wo dicfc Zicicungcn vor 5 Shillingc 

vcrtilJcmcntc ; 



bey B. Frjftcklin bder M- 
u beftcUen findi 



contraucm W indc und dcr Wind-uiTlc . 
fchrieben v/crdeh : Und konten die.'G'- 
vondes Konigs fciccn den Capkain rrir |ecj 
emuigen ausubung cincr HISrugkcil v- XJirc i 
reife belcgen. VYcswcgcn derCapitain Etch . . 
i-cclitfetrigen gu: gefuaden Peinen verletttcn ca- 
rafter Sftentlicb tu defendiren ; inlbndeilicit in 1 
aniehung dcr fal(cbcn und Ichandlichcn a Iwci* 
tiSeraenteo, wckhe find puklieiret vonU 
felbenzu bciieAcn, ui-.d ciic gemucher des 
ink vocurtheilen gegen ihn cin v) nchmei 
cr examtnirer worden und iich fclbft ccchn 
befieyen konte. Wettecs iii- ec nun dan 
dicicnigen gcrichtlichv zu vcrfolgen, srdebe it n* 
io bolshamig verleumde! und cir.cn Proccf»vcr- 
urO.chctb.ibea, dcr nach unteffiichuns 
phncgrUnd gefunden worden. 

Prcifs ftigjt ttder GuUr. Wchz Ci \ iCch 
Mehl, 7 fch. 9 p. Minci brod 12 IcK. 
lafch. braun, 9 fcU. Kum, 2 lch.*4p. 
ltf p. 

A D V & RTI5 5 E M I 7 . N T 

T? S^'ir.l Wfiwil l:k.':: : t rr- i k, thfi 

{j^ van Bcbbci , wither c.vV Jalm Ut 

BbO r M C <\ »C i n X ?.•:•/ /."."v;. :... 

hfcr Ztn wohn •ni*&r&tjilzjti \ Li ftui ."•• : 

hefle Iffid ficltrflt Qhywfch* .-'•:;•:>.'• U 

r;o; <fe fi /. (J ', 

trefikt* ft .,<:'■■:•:■ EngHfchc v 

rabile, weiiri n f i ■ o«r • ' . » i mm dkntiJx 

find ouch t.r. I'ev&hrwti i v .' i I oar 2 

Ifaffrfmcbt. U r tt feixa ; '.-'--;", bu 

dnffittu hk Lxrttia Court, • ivc* I 

Arcnr rianort. / > ■ '"■ ■■■ 



The First Gentian JScwspaper Pabliskid in Ameri 



CO.. 



307 



the wishes of a majority of its patrons the paper would be 
issued every two weeks instead of every eight (lavs. Ab- 
stracts of eleven foreign letters are printed, and an account 
of the trial and acquittal of Captain Jacob Lobb, of the ship 
"Love and Unity," at Barnstable,, Massachusetts, charged 
with .hrutallv killing two Palatine passengers during the vov- 
age from Rotterdam to Martha's Vineyard. The accusers 
and witnesses were fined and imprisoned! A single adver- 
tisement appears, that of Hendrick van Bobber, a name 
familiar in the history of Germantovvn. 

Louis Timothee, the translator for the Zeittfng,xraa a man 
skilled in languages and the printer's art. lie was a prottye 
of Franklin, who made him librarian of the new Philadel- 
phia Library, and after the death of Thomas AVhitemarsh 
put him in charge of his printing office in Charleston, South 
Carolina. Until recently, all that was known concerning 
the FhUadclphische Zcitung was contained in the announce- 
ment made in the Pmnsylcania Gazette, already quoted, for 
no copy of the paper had been seen by any of our anti- 
quarians. By the merest accident, the Rev. Anion Staple- 
ton, of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, whose antiquarian researches 
arc well known, discovered a copy of the second number 
among some old deeds during one of his ministerial jour- 
neys, and through the exertions of Mr. Julius F. Sachse 
this rare Franklin imprint has been added to the collection 
of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 



SOS The Pains amd the To ration of tUh Estate*. 



THE PEXXS AND THE TAXATION OF THEIR ESTATES 
BY THE PROVINCIAL ASSEMBLY. 

(Continued from page 177.) 

Three instruc- y a j^ Whereas the interest monev arising 

tlons to Lieu- 
tenant Gov- from the loan of Bills of Credit in the 

^Mayn.K PH^nce is intended by us and the House of 
Representatives to be applied for the public ser- 
vice of the province and of the inhabitants 
thereof, -and should therefore under the direction 
of the same power that raise it be most care- 
fully applied to those purposes as a greater se- 
curity to the people against misapplication than 
if it was intrusted to only one branch of the 
legislature and such was the ancient practice in 
our said province : you shall therefore not give 
your assent to any Bill or Act of Assembly for 
the emitting or re-emitting and continuing any 
paper currency or Bills of Credit in the said 
province, unless every such Bill or Ad of As- 
sembly do contain one or more enacting clauses 
whereby it shall be effectually enacted, That the 
whole of the interest money t<> accrue, arise and 
become payable from the loan of all such paper 
currency or Bills of Credit hereafter to be feww 
emitted continued or re-emitted shall be disposed 
of only to the very purposes to be mentioned 
and expressed in the same Act in such v 
where the purposes may conveniently be men- 
tioned and expressed therein, or, where that can- 
not conveniently be d^nc then to such purp 
onlv as shall be mentioned and expressed in 
some future Act oi' the governor and asseml ly 
or in some future vote or resohtti uembly 

approved of and signed by the Governor or com- 



The Perms and the Taxation of their Estates. 309 

iiiander-in-ehief of the said prttvihcu for the time 

beiiicr. And whereas there is the same [rood 
reason for securing' to the use of the inhabitants 

any moneys raised on them by excise or any 
other method you shall not give your assent to 
any law for prolonging the present excise or lay- 
ing any other excise or raising any money on 
the inhabitants of the said province of Pennsyl- 
vania unless there be the like enacting clause, 
that all money arising from the said excise or 
oilier duties shall he disposed of only to the very 
purposes to be mentioned and expressed in the 
same Act, in such cases where the purposes may 
conveniently be mentioned and expressed therein 
or where that cannot conveniently he done then 
to such purposes only as shall be mentioned and 
expressed In some future Act of the Governor 
and Assembly or in some future vote or resolu- 
tion of Assembly approved of and signed by the 
Governor or Commander-in-chief of the said 
province for the time being. 

12. Whereas by an Act of Assembly passed 
in the said province in the 12th year of his 
present Majesty's reign, entitled An Act for Re- 
printing, Exchanging and Reemitting all the 
Bills of Credit of this province and for striking 
the further sum of eleven thousand one hundred 
and ten pounds, five shillings, to be emitted upon 
loan, the paper Bills or Bills of Credit o\' the 
said province amounted unto fourscore thousand 
pounds proclamation money or thereabouts and 
although a reasonable and moderate quantity ot 
paper money or Bills of Credit in the said prov- 
ince tends greatly to the service and benefit of 
the said province and its inhabitants as well as 
to the trade of Great Britain, yet the making, 
emitting or continuing too huge a quantity 



310 The Perms and the Taxation of their Estates. 

thereof has in other colonies and would in the 
said province bo prejudicial arid would greatly 
affect the exchange and trade of the said province. 
And whereas it hath been represented to us that 

it will be of advantage to the trade of the raid 
province to rcemit and continue the said four- 
score thousand pounds and even to enlarge and 
encrease the quantity of paper money, you are 
therefore, diligently and carefully to enquire 
whether it is necessary and will he convenient 
to reeinitthe said fourscore thousand pounds and 
also whether it is really necessary to create and 
issue any further sum in .paper currency or Bills 
of Credit in the said province. And in case 
upon your best enquiry you shall find it to be 
really convenient and necessary and of advantage 
to the said province, then, but in no other c - 
you may pass and give your assent to any Act 
or Acts of Assembly in the said province for re- 
emittin£r or continuing the said fourscore thou- 
sand pounds for such time as you shall judge 
proper and also for raising and issuing any fur- 
ther sum or sums in paper currency or Bills of 
Credit which you shall think necessary not to 
exceed the sum of forty thousand pounds \ i 
mation money. Always provided that on every 
such Bill strict regard be had to our foregoing in- 
struction Xumbcr Eleven as to the disposal of all 
the interest to arise from such paper money so to 
be reemitted or continued or to be new rab. 
issued. And also provided that the very ,\ 
for reeiuittlng, continuing or issuing such | 
currency or in some other distinct Act or As ts 
to be passed at the same time it be effectually 
enacted that all rents and quit-rents in the said 
province due or to be due and payable to the 
proprietories for the time being, be always paid 



The Poms and (he Taxation of their Estates. 311 

according to the rate of exchange at the times 
of payment, between the cities of Philadelphia 
and London or some other sufficient provision 
be enacted in lieu thereof in as effectual a man- 
ner as was done by a separate Act at the time 
when the said act of the 12th year of his 
majesty's reign was passed. 

13. " Whereas the making, emitting or con- 
tinuing too large a quantity of paper money on 
[sic] Bills of Credit within the said colony may 
greatly affect the exchange and trade of the 
same, you shall not therefore on any pretence 
whatsoever pass or give your assent to any law 
or Act of Assembly within the said counties for 
enlarging or increasing the present amount or 
quantity of paper currency or Bills of Credit 
there. But in case you shall find it convenient 
and necessary to reemit or continue any paper 
currency or Bills of Credit already issued there 
you shall cause to be inserted in each and every 
law or Act of the said counties for that purpose 
one or more enacting clauses whereby it shall 
be effectually enacted that the whole of the in- 
terest moneys from time to time to accrue, arise . 
and become payable for the loan of all such 
paper currency or Bills of Credit so to be 
reemitted or continued shall be disposed of only 
to the very purposes to be mentioned and ex- 
pressed in the same Act in such cases where the 
purposes may conveniently be mentioned and 
expressed therein or where that cannot conve- 
niently be done then to such purposes only as 
shall be mentioned and cxprcssedin some future 
Act of the Governor and Assembly or in some 
future vote or resolution of Assembly approved 
of and signed* by the Governor or Com- 
mander-in-chief for the time being. And in 






The PiiO'S and the Taxation of th Ir Estates, 

every such Act for reernitting or continuing or 
iu some other distinct and separate Act to be 

passed at the same time you shall also cause to 
be inserted one or more enacting clause or 
clauses effectually to secure that the quit-rents 
and other rents due and to be due to the \ I - 
prietaries shall be paid from time to time ac- 
cording to the true rate of exchange between 
the cities of Philadelphia and London at the 
times of payment or to secure such other suffi- 
cient provision in that respect as was done by 
the province of Pennsylvania by Act passed in 
the twelfth year of his present Majesty's reign. 

20. "TVhereas in our said commission ap- 
pointing you to be our Lieutenant-Governor as 
aforesaid there is contained a general proviso 
that nothing therein contained shall extend to 
give you any power to do, perform, act, Buffer, 
acquiesce in or consent or agree unto any AjCi 
by means whereof we or either of us or our or 
cither of our heirs may be prejudiced in our 
royalties, jurisdictions, properties, estate, right, 
title or interest of, in or to the said province 
or counties or any part of them. Now for your 
better understanding what you are thereby re- 
strained from, we think lit to particularize some 
of the matters which" you are not to do by virtue 
of any of the powers contained in the said com- 
mission, namely you are not to pass or give 
your assent unto any law or Act oi Assem- 
bly by which any oi % our manors, lands, rents, 
quit-rents or other estate may be affected to our 
prejudice or by which our right and power in 
the appointment of auy officers whatsoever shall 
be taken away or lessened or by which [my 
ferry or ferries shall be established to anj per- 
son or persons, nevertheless in case the 1 



The Pants and (he Ttakt&n of !ixir E*i 'A*. 813 

of Representatives of the said province will con- 
sent to pass a general law fur the regulation of 
ferries which have been or shall be established, 

declaring the right of granting such ferries to 
be in the proprietaries as one of the royalties 
granted to them by die charter for the said 
province and for the fixing of the rates to be 
paid at such ferries and for the laying penal- 
ties on persons who shall keep any ferry for hire 
within the limits of our grants and for directing . 
the form of proceeding against such persons, 
you are at liberty to give your consent to and to 
pass such a bill and we recommend to you to 
take any favorable opportunity which may oiler 
to procure such a law in order to put an end to 
all disputes on that head, which was proposed to 
be done by the first of us and the Assembly in 
the year 1735 as may be seen in the Minutes of 
Assembly of that year; you are not to give 
your assent to the passing of any Act of As- 
sembly for the establishment of any Court 
of Chancery, the same having been estab- 
lished there long since by virtue of the 
powers granted in the Royal Charter and 
the said court at the request of the House of 
Representatives, by their resolve of the fourth 
of May 1720 was opened by proclamation of 
the tenth of August following as may bo seen 
by the minutes of Assembly. However in case 
the Assembly shall be willing to po*8 a law for 
the further regulating of the proceedings in 
such court and the fees of the ofiieers, such 
court to consist of the proprietaries and mem- 
bers of the Council or the Lieutenant-Governor 
or Commander-in-chief and members of the 
Council for the time being and to provide that 
neither the proprietaries or their Lieutenant- 



314 The Penns and the Taxation of their Estates. 

Governor or any other of the members respec- 
tively sliall sit in Court in any cause wherein 

their own particular interest is concerned you 
may give your assent to such a law and in the 
meantime as any a] 'plications shall be made to 
you for justice in a course of equity you are I • 
administer the same in the said Court of Chan- 
cery as has been formerly done. You arc also 
to be especially careful never to ask the aid of 
the House of Keprescntatives of the said prov- 
ince nor to give your assent to the passing of 
any Act of Assembly for the doing or perform- 
ing of any matter or thing whatsoever which 
the proprietaries are lawfully impowered by the 
Royal Charter to do or execute of themselves. 

21. Whereas from the first settlement of the 
said province several Acts of Assembly have from 
time to time been passed for raising provincial 
taxes, in all which as well when the government 
was for some time in the hands of the Crown as 
when executed by commissions from our late 
father the estates of the proprietary himself and 
in some of the said Acts those of his children 
and deputies also were exempted from paying 
toward such taxes over and besides which ex- 
emption several Acts were passed giving to the 
said- proprietary a support by duties and other 
impositions as may appear on examination of 
the several Acts of Assembly. And whereas 
since the expiration of those former laws no aid 
hath ever been giant ed by the Assembly to us 
as proprietaries, notwithstanding which we hi Vt 
on several occasions shown our regard to the 
public service oi' the said province by voluntarily 
and cheerfully expending several considerable 
sums of our own money f^r the advancement 
thereof although no pro vincial tax hath been laid 



The PaiM and the Tarvtton of their Estates. 315 

upon the people within oar time for any purpose 

whatsoever until the last year, so that we had no 

reason to suspect that the Assembly of the said 

province -would deviate so much from t lie former 

usage as to pretend by any act of theirs to charge 

our estates in the said province with the burthen 

of any taxes. "We had not therefore given 

to your predecessor any particular instructions 

on that head. And Whereas the Assembly of 

the said province taking occasion of the troubles ■ 

in America to represent us in a very untrue light 

as if we were unwilling to assist the public by 

contributing towards the defence of the country 

though no application had ever once been made 

to either of us for that purpose, did in the last 

year prepare and send to our Lieutenant-Gov-' 

ernor a Bill of a most unjust and extraordinary 

nature and import, intitled " An Act for raising 

X50.000 for the King's use by a tax of twelve 

pence per pound and twenty shillings per head 

yearly for two years on all the estates real and 

personal and tnxables within this province. By 

which Bill it was proposed to he enacted that 

there should be levied and raised upon all the 

estates real and personal within the said province 

of all and every person and persons the estate of 

us the proprietaries not excepted the sum of 

twelve pence for every pound clear value of the 

same yearly for the space of two years, to be 

paid by the owners or possessors thereof ami 

that all located and unimproved lands should be 

rated according to their situation and value at f»*tleiiUr!i 

. , Land Tfcx. 

any prices not exceeding tifrecn pounds nor 
under five pounds for every hundred acres v( 
such unimproved lands, that part oi' such lands 
should be sold to discharge such taws in ease 
the owners of the same or some person for them 



316 The Ptnns tmd the Taxation of their Estai 

neglected or rcfaf«ccl to pay the rates assessed 
thereon ami that the commissioners and as 
of the county of Philadelphia should acquaint 
themselves with and procure the amount as near 
as they were able of our estate in quit-rents 
throughout the province and thereon assess and 
tax the same in the same manner as other estates 
were assessed and taxed the respective counties 
by virtue of that Bill. And whereas there are 
many other ways of raising a tax of £50.000 in 
the said province without resorting to a laud tax 
for that purpose but if a land tax was necessary 
for raising any supply it should be founded on 
justice and, conformable to the Royal Charter, 
be consonant to reason and not repugnant or 
contrary but as near as conveniently may be 
agreeable to the laws, statutes and rights of the 
Kingdom of England. But the said Bill was 
framed so contrary to justice and the laws of the 
same kind in the kingdom that by it one shill- 
ing in the pound for two years was laid on the 
whole value in fee simple of every estate, which 
supposing the same computed at twenty-five 
years purchase only, is a charge of a quarter 
part more than the whole gross rent without 
allowing for any charges or repairs, a tax which 
never was laid nor can possibly he paid in any 
country, a part of the estate only being taken 
for the preservation of the whole, nor was so 
heavy a tax necessary to he laid in Pennsyh . 
for raising the sum of fifty thousand pound.-, for 
if that tax had been truly and fully | and 

paid it must have amounted to many t;: tefi thl I 
sum. But the laying such a large nominal tax 
appears t<> us to have been most unjustly calcu- 
lated for the purpose of putting it in the power 
of persons wholly chosen by the people t 



The Pains and the TuJtdttoh of their folates. 317 

our estates up to the full value therein mentioned 
and to ease other persons by taxing them so 
lightly as only to make up the residue that 
might be wanted to complete the fitly thousand 
pounds. In which case the persons chosen by 
the people might have laid by much the greater 
part of the burthen upon our own estates alone, 
which by former usage had never been taxed at ' 
all. And whereas the laying of taxes on the 
real value of the fee simple and not on the 
yearly income of estates, and upon unimproved 
lands which yield no annual profit or rent to the 
owner, and the sale of the land itself and the 
inheritance thereof for payment of the tax im- 
posed thereon appears to us highly unreasonable 
and not to be the practice in Great Britain and 
no way agreeable but quite contrary to the laws 
and statutes of this kingdom. And whereas 
upon the best enquiries we have made, we can- 
not find that the quit-rents reserved to the Crown 
or to the proprietaries in any other of the Amer- 
ican colonies have ever been taxed towards the 
raising any supplies granted in those colonies, 
and indeed those quit-rents are generally so 
small that little or no land-tax would be duo. or 
payable on them if arising in Great Britain, 
where land-tax acts are. annually pas>ed. And 
the grantors or owners of such farms and plan- 
tations on which such very small quit-rents or 
acknowledgments are reserved to us, do in 
case of a laud-tax, pay tax for the value of such 
their said farms. And whereas oar Lieutenant- 
Governor proposed to the Assembly to except 
or exempt our estates out of the tax to be raised 
by the said XOO.000 Bill, which they refusing to 
do, he. never gave his assent to the said Kill, but 
acquainted the Assembly (as the truth was) that 



318 The J\,ms and the Tuvifiun of their Eftaks. 

we were so far from desiring not to contrih 
to the defence and support of his Majesty's right* 

and dominions, that immediately on the first 
notice sent us of the defeat u? Genera] Brad- 
dock, we had sent over an order upon our Re- 
ceiver-General to pay out of the arrears of our 
quit-rents the sum of £5000 as a free gift towards 
the defence of the said province, desiring at the 
same time that all disputes might be laid aside, 
and that the Governor and Assembly would join 
together in measures to oppose the common 
enemy. And whereas we believe that such 
£5000. so by us given, was about twenty times 
more than the tax upon all our estates there if 
truly and proportionally rated according to all 
other persons' estates in the said province would 
amount to towards raising a sum of 50.000 
pounds. And whereas the Assembly afterwards 
prepared and sent up to the said Lieutenant- 
Governor another Dill entitled An -Vet for grant- 
ing the sum of £00,000 to the King's use, and 
for striking £55,000 thereof in Bills of Credit 
and to provide a fund for sinking the same, 
whereby they proposed to enact that there should 
be levied upon all the estates real and personal 
within that province of all and every person and 
persons (our estates only excepted in consequence 
of our free gift herein before and in the said 
Bill afterwards mentioned) the s ' six pence 

for every pound clear value of the said estates 
Yearly for the space of four years and also that 
all located and unimproved lands in the <..': I 
province should be rated in such a manner ami 
at such values as hail been proposed in tin- 
former Bill, and thai p. nt of such lands si 
he sold in case o( neglect or refusal to pay the 
tax thereon. And whereas his Mai 



The Pcnns and (he Taxation of-.tfteir Eitalcs, 319 

mid the defence of the said province then re- 
quiring money to be inmicdiatuly raised, and our 
said Lieutenant-Governor not being provided 
with our particular instructions relating to any 
such Bill he assented to the same in the month 
of November last. And when the said Act was 
sent over hither for the approbation of his 
Majesty, we tendering as we ought to do to the 
then exigency of affairs and the necessity of an 
immediate supply for his Majesty's service did 
not make any application to his. Majesty for bis 
royal disallowance of the said Act as we should 
have done at another time and on a less occa- 
sion. And whereas the said Assembly in order 
to raise the said tax had by both their said Bills 
appointed Commissioners and Assessors (persona 
chosen by the people only and not any one of 
them by us) and those but very few in number 
to assess or fix the quotas which each estate 
should pay, which persons if ever so well dis- 
posed to act fairly and uprightly therein can 
have no knowledge of the true value of all the 
several estates to be taxed, and yet are made 
final and absolute judges without appeal what 
sum each estate shall pay towards raising the 
said tax; whereby and by laying so great a tax 
to raise so small a sum, such persons may have 
it in their power to commit great irregularities 
in taxing some estates to their utmost value and 
easing others which would be unequal and un- 
just. Wc having been informed that in assess- 
ing the ordinary count v levies on the like plan 
with that whereon the said Bills were formed, 
many persons instead of being rated to their lull 
worth were not rated at one-fiftieth part of their 
supposed worth. And whereas the said Assem- 
bly appear to us to have been iiu lined not only 



320 The Pexiu end the Tamttm of their Estates. 

to load and burthen our estates with taxes by 

their authority, directly contrary to former usage, 
but even to charge the same disproportionably 

and in an unequal manner, in order to case the 
estates of others, which is a measure v -"e are by 
no means willing to consent to. And as the 

present invasion of his Majesty's American do- 
minions may make it necessary to raise further 
supplies for his service in our said province, the 
Assembly may hereafter propose and offer Bills 
or Acts of Assembly to lay additional taxes on 
Not to consent real estates there, you are therefore hereby re- 

unlessthe Q U j re( | auc ] t ]i rC cted Hot to give VOUr a-Seilt tO 
Act for one * O J 

year only. any Bill or Act of Asscmblv of that sort, unless 
the Act be made to continue for one single year 

And agreeable only and no longer : nor unless the same be 
itshAct. ng " made as agreeable as possible to the general 
tenor of the Acts of Parliament annually passed 
for raising the land-tax in that part of Great 
Britain called England (especially by hiving the 
tax with respect to the real estates upon the par- 
ticular houses or lands in the respective countries 
or districts by which the rate of it may at any 
time be seen. Nor unless the tax as to real es- 

And on the an- tates be laid upon the true annual rent or yearly 

nual value of . , . , , , , 

land. value only (such yearly value, where persons 

Occupy their own lands or houses to be D 
tained in some such manner as hereinafter men- 
tioned) and not upon the real value of the fee- 
simple of the real estate, nor unless the tax . - I 
And interest of personal estate he laid \\[^o\\ the annual iuU 

tote. '" Or profit and not UpON the whole capital thereof. 

Nor unless the whole method ot' assessing, 

lecting and paying in of the same be particularly 

and specially laid down in the bodv of such Bill 
Method of t.\x- l \ 

cti<?n noc to or Aet itseli and w A l»v rctercncc to any other 

uuvr toocher ]Vdl or Act. Nor unto!, in order that such Bill 



The Pernis and the Taxation of thnr Estates. 321 

or Act may be founded in equal justice there be 
effectual clauses therein to ascertain the true and 
real rent or yearly value of every estate in buds 
or houses in the province, first, by having a good 

number of the most considerable inhabitants out 
of every township in the several counties inserted 
in the Bill as commissioners. Such commission- 
ers before they act to be solemnly sworn or 
affirmed to do impartial justice and to have 
power in them to cite and compel to appear and . 
be sworn or affirmed before them all tenants and 
other persons in order to discover what rents are 
really and truly paid in cases where land or 
houses are let out at rack-runts. And in other 
cases, or when persons occupy their own land or 
reside in their own houses the commissioners to 
have power to enquire by the menus aforesaid or 
by any other lawfull and reasonable ways and 
means, what the inheritance oi' such lands and 
houses is worth to be sold at the utmost, and 
then to estimate and tax such houses and lands 
as of the 'yearly value of so much as the interest 
of such sum at the low rate of £3 per cent per 
annum amounts to. Nor unless all unoccupied Ciweeujted 

1 r. uds e \- 

and unimproved lauds whatsoever, and also all v; •..-.. 
our quit-rents in the said province be expressly 
excepted, and exempted from such tax. But ill 
case the Assembly shall propose to raise supplies 
by a land-tax Bill and such Bill shall be clear of 
every of the foregoing objections or prohibitions, 
and shall not contain any tax further than after 
the rate of one, two, three or at the utmost four 
shillings in the pound for any one year upon tlie 
annual rent or yearly value so to bo ascertained 
as aforesaid of houses, lands or tenements in tUc 
said province and also to tax the personal e» 
tates in the said province, subject to the fotC- 
VOL. XXIV. — '21 



322 The Pans and tic Taxation of their Jfrtal 

going regulations. Then and in such eat* you 
may give your absent to the .same if you think 
the same a reasonable, just and necessary V>\\\ in 
all other respects. A nd you shall take care that 
every such JSill or Act which you shall assent to 
shall contain clauses for the tenants of re. I • 
tates paying such tax and deducting the same 
out of the yearly rent payable to the landlord 
provided such yearly rent amounts to the sum of 
twenty shillings and upwards according to the 
Acts for laying a land-tax in England and clauses 
for distress upon any matters distrainable being 
upon the taxed premises, but no clause or power 
to distrain or sell the house or land itself or any 
part thereof in any ease for satisfaction of the 
tax and unless such clauses be inserted you shall 
not give your assent to any such Bill or Ac:. 
.And whereas we are and always have been most 
ready and willing to bear a just proportion 
along with our tenants in any necessary tax for 
the defence of the said province which shall be 
equally laid upon the lands of the inhabitants, 
and also upon any of our manors or lands which 
are actually. let out on lease, either for lives i r 
May uix the years as being estates in some degree lib 
k^choid es- xho^e of which the inhabitants are possessed. 

tnte* of the . ■ 

proprietaries, therefore you are at liberty to give your consent 
to any reasonable Bill or Act lor that purp 
Provided the tax to [sic] paid for such our last 
mentioned estates shall be payable by the tci ' 
and occupants who .-hall deduct the same ( 
the rents payable by them to us. And you .-hall 
not consent to any Bill or Act for taxi?! 
v tine- or purchase moneys to he paid to us by ar.\ 

son on purchase from us o\ any estate in Ue 
simple or for life i>r lives, as the tax i- to tx laid 
on the land, and the taxing the nu-uey pa 



Sth Aug. 1730. 



The Poms and the Thmtion of their Estate*. 

purchase of the lancte, or of a freehold or inher- 
itance therein, would be in eifeet to pay. two 
taxes for the same tiling-, and that landlords in 
this kingdom do not pay any land tax for such 
purchase money, but only for the reserved rent 
when it amounts to above twenty shillings per 
annum, the residue of the tax fur such land being. 
paid by the purchaser. 

The Lieutenant-Governor Denny arrived in 
Pennsylvania and immediately, upon the Assem- ' 
bly's request, he, pursuant to the orders lie had 
received, laid those five foregoing instructions 
before the Assembly: and thereupon they have 
sent over their great leader in the Assembly, 
Benjamin Franklin, to represent their pretended 
grievances either to the lung or to the Parliament. 

This Mr. Franklin professes to wish, on his 
part, an amicable agreement and composure and 
in order thereto, has delivered to proprietaries 
no address, representation or remonstrance whatever 
from the Assembly., but only a paper, signed by 
himself, in the following words : 

HEADS OF COMPLAINT. 

1. That the reasonable and necessar? power II, - 1,N of rom " 

* x , plaint, 90 Au- 

given to the Deputy Governors of Pennsylvania Ru*t i:.:. 
by the Royal Charter, Sect. 4 and 5, of making ncre*u^or* 
laws with the advice and consent of the Assent- « ,f ** R«y*> 

, . . , . • , , phartcr n re 

bry for raising money for the satety or the conn- »rtfuii] 
trv and other public 0#es " accottKng to (heir ; r - ,: ^' 

1 ° bring ut the 

best discretion" is taken away by proprietary in- As*em 
structions, enforced by penal bonds and restrain- 
ing the deputy from the use of his best discre- 1*** 
tion; though being on the spot he can better 
judge of the emergency, state and neei-.<>ity of 
affairs, than proprietaries residing- at a great dis- 
tance, by means oi' which restraint- sundry >i;u.^ 



liscretlon m 
to laws to bo 



The Pt/tns and the Taxation of their Estates. 

of money granted by the Assembly tor the de- 
fence of the province have been rejected by the 
deputy, to the great injury of his Majesty's ser- 
vice in time of war and danger of the loss of 
the colony. 

2. That the indubitable right of the Assembly 
to judge of the mode, manner and time of grant- 
ing supplies, is infringed by instructions that 
enjoin the Deputy to refuse his assent to any Bill 

• for raising money unless certain modes, measures 
and times in such instructions directed, make a 
part of the Bill, whereby the Assembly in time 
of war are reduced to the necessity of either 
loosing the country to the enemy or giving up 
the liberties of the people and receiving law 
from the proprietaries. And if they should do 
the latter in the present case it will not prevent 
the former, the instructions beinsj such as if 
complied with it is impossible to raise a sum 
suiKcient to defend the country. 

3. That the proprietaries have enjoined their 
deputy by such instructions to refuse his as^ent 
to any law for raising money by a tax, though 
ever so necessary for the defence of the country 
unless the greatest part of their estate is exempt 
from such tax. This to the Assembly and people 
of Pennsylvania appears both unjust and cruel. 

The proprietaries are now requested seriously 
to consider these complaints and redress the ag- 
grievanees complained of in the most speedy nutl 
effectual manner, that harmony may be restored 
between the several braiui.es of the legislature, 
and the public service be hereafter readily and 
fully provided for. B. Fbanklix, Agent fbr 
the Province of Pennsylvania, London, A 
20th. 1757. 

(To be continued.) 



A Sgnojms of PenttsylcantH Hi&tory. 



A SYNOPSIS OF PENNSYLVANIA iflSTOJRY. 1 

BY CHARLES P. KEITH. 

When I was honored with the invitation to address this 
assemblage, the question, almost forbidding, was, what should 

be my topic. Not having the ability of Mark Twain, I could 
not do as he did, when, as he declares, he began a series ot 
magazine articles upon agriculture, because he knew noth- 
ing about it, and therefore would not be embarrassed by 
facts. . I could not rise to flights of oratory which would 
make vou forget the subject-matter — I must confine mvselt 
to the scope of my knowledge. I came to the conch. 
that it would not be a waste of time for the active members 
of this society at this stage of their education to listen to a 
synopsis of the history of Pennsylvania, This I present to 
you, as elementary and short as the occasion requires, hoping 
to point out some features \\ hich you might overlook in your 
reading. 

I will not begin with the red man, although the Lenin 
Lenapc are really the "old- families 91 of Philadelphia; nor 
will I narrate the early attempts to settle on the Delaware by 
those hardy navigators who gave the names to Capes May 
and Jlenlopen, and who, if successful, would have made the 
region now known as the Middle States a Boer republic. 
Henry Hudson, the discoverer, was in the service of the 
Dutch East India Company, and the builders v\ the fort at 
Beversrede on the Schuylkill, the first white men apparently 
who resided within the limits of Pennsylvania, the first pur- 
chasers probably of any 'of its soil from the Indians, were 

1 An address delivered June S, 1900, before tin- Plnloiuathean Society 

of the University of Pennsylvania. 



32G A Synopsis of Pentttylrama History. 

agents of the Dutch Vest India Company, chartered in K21 
to colonize and trade with Southern Africa and America. 
But the figure which looms upas the founder of Europe 
civilization west of the Delaware is Gustavo* Adolphua of 
Sweden. Fresh from the history of the Thirty Years War, 
you recognize that the figure is majestic and heroic, although 
in this drama it plays a short part. At the suggestion ot % 
Ussclinx, who had organized the Dutch West India Com- 
pany, this King of the Swedes, Goths, and Wends and Prince 
of Filmland chartered in 102G the South Company with the 
exclusive right to trade with Africa and America below the 
latitude of Gibraltar, and in 1G32 approved of extending the 
territorial limits of its operation, and of opening its member- 
ship to his German allies ; but with this new charter await- 
ing his signature, lie was killed in battle, lie was succeeded 
on the throne by a character even more interesting, his 
daughter Christina, who has been called "the Semiramis of 
the North/' She being then a little child, the government 
was carried on mainly by the great Chancellor Oxenstierna, 
who in 1638 planted a Swedish colony on Christiana Creek. 
The country was called New Sweden, and before long all 
the land from Cape. Ilcnlopcn to Morrisville, Bucks County, 
was bought from the Indians. Peter Minuet, the captain of 
the first expedition, was a native of Cloves, and at one time 
director of Xew Netherlands; the chaplain who accom- 
panied him or the next expedition was a native of West 
Gothland, and had been a professor in Gothenburg. In the 
course of a few years came many colonists from Sweden, 
spreading along the Delaware and Schuylkill, even crossing 
the bay to Xew Jersey. A fur the conquest by England, 
intercourse was still maintained with their old home, learned 
men from Sweden coming to visit this part of the New World, 
and down to the American Revolution the clergymen of the 
Swedish churches here being appointed by the Swedish 
Crown. Yet as the English increased in numbers, the 
Swedish part of the population was speedily absorbed with- 
out apparently affecting the rest ; those bearing the patrony- 



A &yn&f>m of Pemtsyh'ama History. 327 

mics of these old settlers declined in importance, their lan- 
guage ceased to he spoken, and while there are many per- 
sons descended from them in the female line, there is little 
to remind us of their time hat a few churches, now united, 
moreover, to the ecclesiastical body which here represents the 
Church of England, i. e.\ the Protestant Episcopal Church. 
Among the settlers during Queen Christina's reign was Olof 
Persson Stille, ancestor of the late Charles J. Stille, LL. D., 
who was Provost of this University from 1868 to 1880, who 
moved the institution to its present home, and started its 
new life. It was my privilege to pass my college days 
under his provostship, and during his professorship. In 
later years he was the hardworking President of the His- 
torical Society of Pennsylvania. I hardly think I can be 
contradicted in calling him the most eminent of our citizens 
of Swedish blood and name. 

The Swedes were conquered in 1G55 by the Dutch, and 
the latter have left fewer traces than the Swedes. The storm- 
ing of the fort at Xew Amstcl, now Xew Castle, Delaware, 
by the English in 1G64 gave the Swansons and other inhab- 
itants of the site of Philadelphia a change of masters; but 
the Dutch retook Xew York and its dependency in 1G73, 
and held both a few months, when the treaty of Westminster 
restored them to the English. 

During the one hundred years and more of English rule 
the people of this region were accustomed to. an intermediary 
between their resident chief oilicer, or even their captain 
general at Xew York, and the King. Charles II. 's brother, 
the Duke of York, he who afterwards came to the throne as 
James II., appointed the actual governors, and was treated 
as owner of the soil prior to the vesting of such powers and 
rights in William Penn. I sometimes feel that the prim iple 
of proprietary government thus established is looked upon 
as natural by the majority o( the voters of Pennsylvania even 
at the present day, however inconsistent it was with mon- 
archy, however inconsistent it is with "government of the 
people, by the people, and for the people." 



328 A Syiwpsfa of Petinsylcavia History, 

When the Dutch first surrendered tiie New Netherlands, 
the father of William Penn had already risen so high in the 
service of Charles IL and the Duke of York a?, probably to 
look forward to a peerage for himself or his son. At the 
time William Penn sat for the portrait which represents him 
in armor, he was a young man of more position in the gay 
world than anybody else who ever joined the Society of 
Friends. His embracing Quakerism did not entirely deprive 
him of royal friendship, nor eradicate from his own heart a 
certain feelimr for the Stuarts, which probably lasted through 
his life. At the death of his father a claim for money from 
the Crown survived, and in satisfaction of this a princely 
domain of over forty thousand square miles hearing his 
name was granted to William Penn by Charles IL, and the 
lower counties, now called the State of Delaware, were re- 
leased by the Duke of York. Of all this Penn and his 
heirs, with the title of Proprietary, were to be feudal lords; 
even when they parted with a piece of land in fee simple, 
their feudal interest in it was not extinguished, as would 
have been the case in England, but they became an inter- 
mediate lord between the purchaser and the King. Rent 
called quit-rent was reserved out of all the lands sold. It 
was by the advice of Henry Compton, Bishop of London, 
that Penn bought the country from the Indians. Thus he 
did like the Dutch and Swedes. 

Penn and his heirs bore the title of Governor until the 
American Revolution; and although we popularly speak of 
Governor Gordon, Governor Thomas, Governor Hamilton, 
and others, they were merely lieutenant-governors admin- 
istering the office as deputies of the Pmns. It was owing 
to this and the disindi nation of the Assembly to vote good 
salaries that the. position was never held by a person of qual- 
ity, except one penniless baronet, bat generally by a well-to- 
do provincial or an interior military otticcr, while we find 
noblemen and generals as the royal governors of Other 
nies. The binding of our lieutenant-go vernora by instruc- 
tions, the expectation that they would he controlled b\ 



A Synopsis of l\imsyb:oroa History. 320 

tain persons in whom tlic proprietary family had inure con- 
fidence, made the pfliec still less attractive. Ability and 
character were not secured, to command the respect which 
in that day would have been paid to rank. May I not say 
that from then until now, except at intervals, < ; bossism " has 
closed the way of political preferment to such men of ability 
as have taken for their own the motto of our Commonwealth, 
"Virtue, Liberty, and Independence ,"? Statesmen came to 
the front during the Revolutionary period. Two Pennsyl- 
vanians, Mifflin and St. Clair, held the presidency of the 
Continental Congress. It would be easy to turn my remarks 
into a panegyric upon Robert Morris and others, and then, 
after a notice of some persons and events in the next gener- 
ation, give a scandalous chronicle of later polities. But I 
must confine myself to the less familiar and less inspiring 
theme of earlier times. In speaking of Pennsylvania prior 
to the incorporation among its citizens of the Connecticut 
claimants who had settled on the north branch of the Susque- 
hanna, but had never recognized the Penhs, and prior to the. 
growth of Pittsburgh, and the prosperity of the Scotch-JrisH, 
and prior to the long political ascendency of the German 
element called the "Pennsylvania Dutch," we may disregard 
all but the southeastern section of the State, and treat only 
of tlie English and Welsh part of the population. 

Penn sent over for various positions in the government a 
number of his kinsmen and connections, and these were, SO 
to speak, the patricians of the earlier emigration. But no 
enormous grants of land nor laws of primogeniture made 
or preserved distinctions. Excepting for the position and 
rights of the proprietary family, at one time looked upon as 
a bulwark of liberty, Pennsylvania was a democracy where 
English Quakers of the industrial classes were making the 
"Holy Experiment" of a state. founded upon equality as well 
as peace. They fined an almanac-maker fur styling William 
Penn "Lord Penn;" they appealed to Quakers in England 
to coerce their great eo-n ligionist ; they allowed a Court of 
Chancery onlv a few vears; thev contended for the rurht to 



330 A Synopsis of Pcnmyhctnia li<>f'>rj. 

tax the lands of the Proprietaries, and finally asked the 
Crown to abolish the Proprietaries' share in the govern- 
ment; and when the American Revolution made the people 
supreme, they forced the family to sell to the State all unsold 
land not embraced in the manors, and to forego all quit- 
rents except from manor lands. 

The Quakers maintaining- their influence in the Assembly 
of the Province until in 175G a number of them were in- 
duced to retire from that body, money for war was for a 
long period obtained from the provincial treasury only by 
such casuistry as that they were bound in conscience to irivc 
" to the King's use," or by such subterfuge as that an appro- 
priation for " grain" meant gunpowder. The Scotch-Irish 
on the frontiers were naturally belligerent, bore the brunt of 
the conflicts with the French and Indians, and with their 
kinsmen in other colonics were mainly the backbone of 
America in the struggle for independence. But it is remark- 
able that suddenly at the Revolution the Quaker region pro- 
duced military leaders. I have in mind two who had had no 
previous experience, Anthony "Wayne from his farm, and 
John Cadwalader from his store. The fame o'i the former 
is transcendent. The Commander-in-Chief leaned much on 
the advice of the latter. As a little tiling has sometimes 
changed the course of history, it is possible that Cadv.ala- 
der's duel with Conway was a more important event than 
has appeared to historians, for the wounded Conway apolo- 
gized to "Washington, and the Cabal to deprive us of him 
who was "First in "War, hirst in Peace, and First in the 
Hearts of his Countrymen" dissolved. Pennsylvania has 
continued to produce her heroes oi the battle-field, some 
fresh from peaceful avocations, some trained in tactics, some 
educated at West Point. Many oi % us think that there should 
have been a higher appreciation of Meade. At any rate, in 
the war to preserve the Union, the critical battle or series of 
battles in which the" hi^h-water mark" of the Confederacy 
was reached, and the tide was driven back, was f 
Pennsylvania soil, and the result accomplished largely by 



A Synopfte of Ptmitylvanui Jf> : >f.ory. 831 

Pennsylvania troops, eoinmnndcd by Pennsylvania generals, 
Meade and Gregg, Reynolds and Tlaueoefc, the Wellington 
of tlie Waterloo being flic Philadelphia!!, Meade. 

I must caution yon against describing those who made 
Pennsylvania as Boeotian and unlettered. Earlv Quakers 
look' their pride in controversy, and their Measure in Latin, 
Greek, and Hebrew. The schoolmasters and the practi- 
tioners of physic were numerous. Wealthy non-Quakers 
sent sons to London to the Inns of Court. The pre-eminent 
scholar amoim- those not born here was James Logan* a 
matriculate of no university, reared to no learned pro- 
fession, whose earlier literary advantages lay in his being the 
son of a Scotch dominie turned Quaker, in whose school he 
assisted i'or a short time. From mercantile life in Bristol 
he was taken by Penn as secretary, and came over in 1699, 
and for years was the business agent of the Proprietary, 
with all which it involved — real estate agent, merchant, 
negotiator with the Indians, and politician. But you can 
see under the care of the Library Company of Philadelphia 
the many books in various languages which he imported and 
read. He was deemed fit to be chief justice of the Prov- 
ince. He investigated natural phenomena; he published a 
translation of Cicero's Do Sevccitik, and one in verse of 
Dionysius Cato ? s Distkha dc Moribm, . Some of his commu- 
nications to the learned world were printed at Lcyden and 
Amsterdam. A\ r e sons of the University of Pennsylvania, 
•perhaps most fittingly describing ourselves, in view of the 
history of our Alma Mater, as grandsons of the College of 
Phikdelphja and great-grandsons of the Academy of Phila- 
delphia, are fully appreciative oi' our d<ht to a greater natu- 
ral philosopher than Logan, to him who a few months after 
Logan's death snatched the lightning from the clouds, and 
a quarter of a century later, by his negotiations with France, 
snatched the sceptre from, tyrants, — Benjamin Franklin, the 
best remembered Pennsylvania!! (for he lived here from his 
youth) of our Revolutionary petit*!, the soeond most impor- 
tant American in that stumble, — hut we should be proud of 



332 A jfynogwi of Pcwzylcanty History 

the fact that James Logan, more of an universal scholar, 
headed the list of the trustees of the Academy in 1 V4f». 
The Republic of Loiters was extended to oar an«l 

mountains by German sectarians, whose learning, to be sure, 
was mainly theological, and whose philosophy ran to mys- 
ticism. Pietists, Moravians, Lutheran*, who had had 
best education afforded in that day, graduated from German' 
universities, and trained for a career in law, diplomacy, the 
lecture-room, or the pulpit, established communities, printed 
books, and preached to the Indians; while the more utilita- 
rian English-speaking inhabitants found, perhaps for all 
time, their highest intellectual practice in law and medicine. 
The Philadelphia lawyer, as the unravcller of the intricate, 
has been proverbial throughout the United States: to he 
taught by the Philadelphia doctor, students have come from 
the entire hemisphere. 

Philadelphia, within a few decades from its founding, out- 
stripped all the other cities in the colonies in population and 
trade. Its philanthropy kept pace with its prosperity. It 
opened its doors to all religions. Although the Quaker 
City, it has been called the home of Presbytcrianism in 
America, and the Church of England flourished here with- 
out tithes, transmitting to her daughter Church a position 
in some respects leading. . Non-jurors and Whiteficld and 
Zinzcndorf came here on mission?. Jews, at least those 
with the blood of Israel, mingled in the most exclusive 
society. 

When the natural advantages of other places diverted its 
commerce, and made it secondary in thos^' matters follow- 
ing in the train of wealth, historic association hecame the 
essential importance o( Philadelphia. It will always attract 
as the Mecca of American liberty, with Independence Hall 
as its Kaaha. This national interest in our past, 1 \\ 
have you bear in mind in all consideration o( the wants ol 
our city. Cherish the tame and the foot-prints fth iG w 
have preceded us. I do not mean build monuments: it 
mementoes he needed, the endowment of a fellowship or 



A SyMJwis of Pennsylvania History. 333 

professorship will .serve- the double purpose of honoring 1 1 jo 

dead and benefitting the living. Let your influence be 
strong for the preservation of such landmarks as teach or 
illustrate history, whether they be sueii as Old Swedes' 
Church, or Logan's dwelling-bouse (called " Stenton"), or 
even the name of Swanson Street, Nor do I wish to spur 
you to over-restoration, whereby . posterity will not know 
what is old, and what only pretends to be old. With these 
suggestions I close my address >o you Philomathcans, for I 
suppose that, like the members of our society in my college 
days, the majority of you are natives and prospective resi- 
dents of this city. In late years it lias become a home tor 
all races, colors, and tongues, making it well to remember 
its name and the Scriptural injunction which its founder 
had at heart: C II <i>r/.a&c/.cj)ia fjteviro. Abounding with 
Quaker comfort and with Christian love of God, may the 
wish expressed in the paronomasfic motto of the corporation' 
have its fruition: Pftiladdpiua iwncto! 



334 Foreigners irho mrh'cd at Pkiladdpfrm, 1791—1792, 



LISTS OF FOREIGNERS WHO ARIfclVEB AT PHILA- 
DELPHIA, 1791-1702. 

contributed by luther r. kllkrr, esq. 
(Continued from page 104. ) 

To His Excellency Thomas Mifflin Esquire, 

Governor oe the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. 

Sir: I take the Liberty to Transmit to your Excellency 

the Lists of Xames of German Passengers who arrived at the 

Port of Philadelphia from August 13 th to September 25* 

| A: C: | I further more add that nothing Occurred in 

the Proceedings of my Office which wants any alteration. 

I have the Honor to be 

with the greatest respect 

Your Excellency's most Obedient 
and Very Humble Servant 

Lewis Farmer Register of 
Piiila Nov. i" 1702 Gcrnhin Pbssenger*. 

En ; List van be Manschaft in hett Sciiiee He Eeau Cat h- 
kina Cart. Henheick Traltman c.ekommen yon Hamburg 
gedistennt (?) na. Philadelee met Passasieein. 

Her P>erze unt sein frau und Kindt. 

Dochter alt 26 Jahr .... 

Hiarigette alt 20 Jahr .... 

Mars Puamor mit Frau and Sohn 

Jacob Evan alt 20 Jahr .... 

FriedriekOldwk-k \\Vstfall 

Johann Loraun alt 22 Jahr 

Westfallen unt Fran und -1 [under 

Johan Hendri.k Oi.-vu alt 2D Jahr . 

Uenclrick Tid alt 20 Jahr 

Friedrieh ScheVdcr mit soin Frau 



1 ] 


>crson 


1 


dito 


o 
O 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 





dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


.i 


dito 



Foreigners who arrived at Philadelphia, 

Stubbe mit Frau und 5 Kinder 

Lindcrman mil Frau und 2 Kinder . 

Anna Lcimslaek 38 Jahr 

Johan Bonsa 28 Jahr 

Melgert Qwans mit Frau und 2 Kinder 

Johan Schmelsen mit Frau und 2 Kinder 

Johan Bauer mit Frau 

Danniel Wktschief mit Braiit . 

Jocliim Bitter mit Frau und Kindt . • 

Jolian AVittschief mit Braiit 

Johan Sparer mit Frau und 2 Kinder 

Hendrik Dirks alt 32 Jahr 

Miehel Broan alt 24 Jahr 

Johan Gasan alt 30 Jahr . 

Franz Bronstedt alt 22 Jahr 

Johan Somerfeldt alt 28 Jahr 

Martien Tiel und Sohn 8 Jahr . 

Margretha Casiens und Sohn 3 Jahr 

Paul Husing alt 34 Jahr • . 

Cliristienn Schroder alt 42 Jahr 

Johan Bohr Mcstar mit Frau una Kindt 

Cathrine Kromron alt 22 Jahr . 

Peter Tien alt 28 Jahr 

Jochim Piole alt 37 Jahr . 

Christina Tempel alt 32 Jahr . 

llans Sehultz nit 25 Jahr •. 

Johann Mosemann alt 34 Jahr . 

Johann Wa<*gner mit Frau und Kindt 

Carlel Dell mit Frau 

Pieter Holtz mit Frau 

Jochim Lorentz mit Frau 

Christina Wcstcn mit 3 Kinder 

Peter Bokkendall mit Frau und 2 Kinder 

Hans Beyter mit Finn und Kindt 

Jochim Hagemann mit Fr.au und 2 Kindei 

Jochim van Nctten alt 44 Jahr . 

Martin SchaeiVuer alt 24 Jahr . 



I'ji-jl 



92. 


q a c 


»1 


teraona 


4 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


4 


dito 


4 


dito 


2 


dito 


2 


dito 


3 


dito 


r» 


dito 


2 


dito ? 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


2 


dito 


2 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


3 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


3 


dito 


2 


dito 


2 


dito 


2 


dito 


4 


dito 


4 


dito 


3 


dito 


4 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 



336 Foreigners who arrived at PhiUitklplwL, 1701-1702. 



Klip Ekhart alt 24 Jahr . 
Johan Rcymcra - alt 20 Jalir 

Johann Kramer alt 42 Jalir 

Jolian Hagh mit Fran und 2 Kinders 

Paul Schiitt alt 32 Jalir . 

Franz Bchmitt mit Frau und Kindt . 

Jocliim Pingel mit Frau und 5 Kinders 

Glaus Koppnaan mit Frau und 5 kind era 

Clas Hipnor mit seiu Braut 

Anna Catherine Stieilen . 

Tcrbann alt 20 Jalir . 

llelmke mit Solm alt 5 Jalir 

Beyter ..... 

HascL und Brudcr 

Siek 



1 


person 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


4 


dito 


1 


dito 


3 


dito 


7 


dito 


7 


dito 


2 


dito 


1 


dito 


1 


dito 


2 


dito 


1 


dito 


o 


dito 


1 


dito 



Attgust 3, 1702. 

List of Passengers on boa 
Salter, Master, 

Henry Bart. 

Cctlmet Bart. 

Casp Kuhnzick. 

Ann Kuhnzick. 

Cathnet Kuhnzick a child. 

Ban Bart. 

Margret Bart. 

Gathrine Bart. 

•Cathrinc Bart. ' 

Johann Bart* 

Hein. Bart. 

John Tungent. 

Barbry Tungent. 

Anne Susannye Tungent. 

Calh. Tungent. 

Susanne Tungent. 

Barhry Tungent 

Niclos Tun&ent a child. 



rdthe Sinr " Rainbow/' Richard 
from Amsterdam, 1792. 

Nichols Gudder mouth. 
Catharine G uddermouth. 
Hans Gudermoutb. 
Lau r Gudermoutb. 
Philip Gudermuth. 
Nichlos Gudermuth. 
Dorety Gudermuth chikt. 
Johan Zittle. 
B a l-l >ry Zittle. 
Johann Zittle. 
Niehlos Zittle. 
EUz rt Zittle 
Geo. Zittle. 
Gcrtrute Zittle. 
John Geo. Zittle a child. 
William Walter. 
Margret Walter. 
Susana Waiter. 



Foreigners who arrived at Philadelphia 1701-1702. 337 

Jacob Walter- Johanna Gudemnth. 

Peter Walter. Catharine Itartniamiia. 

Johanna Walter a child. Law 7 Schlefciiig. 

Michel Marten. P>. G. Sehneek. 

Xicholus Burkhart. John M Sou ft. 
PiiIlada. Sept. 7, 17i>2 

Ejciid Baltib 

List of all the Passengers ox board the Ship " Columbia," 
Capi. Wm. Maley. 

Andres ll'enniscli. Valentin Ekhart. 

George Storck. . Frederic Frcutley. 

Phillipp Geist. George Meyer. 

LTenric ]\erthwein. Christopher Brume, 

Georg Xenzcnhoefler. Wilhelmine Fielir. 

Franz Dunne. Ludwig Riedy. 

Conrad Weigand. Christina Schildin. 

Conrad Ekhart. Feltcr Fischborn. 

Christian Fahler. Adam Schetzel. 

George Weistenbach. A dan Euer. 

Ilartmann Scheer. Christine Pilleinan.. 

Johan Schirmer. Elisabctha Dilleman. 

Anna Schirmer, his wife. Catherine Potterin. 

Conrad Schirmer, his son. Elisabetka lleidlinger. 

Fetter Emig. Matthieu Grunnenwald. 

Ludwig Schewkel John Meyer. 

Anne Elisabeth, his wife. "Anne Marie Meyer, his wife. 

Anna Catharinc,his daughter John Adam, his sun. 

Kunigunda Simonin. Nicholas IlctterrioU. 

George Albrecht. Eva Elizabeth ULcttorich, his 
Heinrick Albrecht. wife. 

Catharine Midler. John Adam, his son. 

John Wcrnet Esert. Casper Werner. 

Marie Magdalene, his wife. Murgretha Werner, his wife. 

Gabriel Anient. Conrad Werner and ) his 

Joseph Knobelbasch. John Werner J sons. 

Michel Pobler. John Larch. 
voi,. xxiv. — '22 



338 Ibmgnera who urriccd at Ph'daMpitU^ 1701-1792. 



John Oblinger. 
Barbara, his wife. 
Christian, his son, 13. 
Barbara, bis daughter, 12. 
John, bis son, 10. 
Carl, his son, 8. 
Jacob, his son, 3 }. 
Lorenz Hoffman. 
Louis Ducornena. 
Ilennes Boulett. 
Frederic Pitseher. 
Barbara, his wife. 
Frederic, his son. 
Barbara, his daughter. 
Abraham, his son. 
Bodolpb Pitseher. 
Maria Margaretlia,his daugh- 
ter. 
Jacob Hug. 
John Prussel. 
Catlierina, his wife. 
Jacob Fclm j, his son, 
John Miiller. 
Andrae Miiller, 
Jacob Miiller. 
Jacob G erst or. 
John Gcrster. 
Martin Gass. 
ITeinrich Scheffers. 
Christian Burger. 
Barbara Wurtz. 
Elisabethn Keller. 
Michel Sol inert zinger. 
Samuel Gentseh. 
Ludwig Koch. 
Frederick Geiler. 
Jacob Knanp. 



George Prcfcach. 

Catharina Schallerin. 

Petter Werner. 

Philip Strohc. 

John Ilaxtmann. 

Barbara, his wife. 

Anne Maric,hia daughter, 11 

years. 
Elizabetha, his daughter, 8 



years. 
Barbara 



, his daughter, 



years. 
Nicholas, his son, 3 years. 
Margaretha, his daughter, 

I year. 
Daniel Zsast. 
George Benner. 
Dorothee Reissenach. 
Philip Emce. 
Wilhelm Kohler. 



George Xauer. 



I his daug 



Charlotta, his wife. 
Charlottn & 
Xarbara, 
Jacob Xaue. 
Christina, his wife. 
Jacob, his son. 
Daniel Daw Xicda. 
Christoph Shmitt 
John Shmitt. 
Narbara llainmin. 
Frederic Erbes. 
Magdalina Pfeiffc 
Bent om tiller. 
Feraiuant Locwenfttern, 
John Mullor. 
Louisa Kilenbcnrcr, 



hters. 



Foreigners who arrived at Philadelphia, 1101-1702. 3-30 



George Lndwig. 

George Ludwig, his son. 

Blasjdaline & 1 , .' , , . 
~ V • > his daughter; 

Catharma, J ° 

John Weiss. 

Maria Xotemius. 

Gottliebe jL , - , 
' , ., > his daughters. 

Fredenka, J 

Heinrich Huckard. 
"Wendelina Dormick. 
Catharine Lexin. 
George Weimann. 
John Gast. 
Marie Eilserin. 
Jacob, her son. 
Caroline Hochstein. 
Jacob Schuster. 
Margarethe Baldin. 
Dorothee Bohrscheid. 
Fetter Oymer. 

Sept. 8, 1702. 



Frederic Schneider. 
Jacob Klein. . 
Phillip Frey. 
Michel Xeyley. 
Catharina Griininger. 
Barbara "Wacherin. 
Andres Barthels. 
Justus Barthels. 
George Schiebelhuth. 
Henri et Dugenhart. 
Xicolas Schmitt. 
Frantz Better Remann. 
Jacob "VTibbeli ng. 
Ludwig Mierg. 
John Van Griinningen. 

Conrad Seypart. 
John Keller. 
Jacob Frey. 

John Gottlieb Berg- 
mann. 



i 

o 
o 



List of Passengers on board Brig " JIkniu.cts," Catt. 
Martin Jayer, from Amsterdam. Philadelphia, Sett.* 22, 
1792. 



1— Johannes Theodoru: 

Bart.lain. 
2 — George Sehutz. 
3— Margarethe Schultz. 
4 — Johannes Anspach. 
5 — Christine Saehsen. 
C — her child -J weeks old. 
7 — Catharine Banien. 
8 — Sibella Damon. 
9— Godfrey Kerch. 
10 — Joliann Schmaltz. 



11- — Johannes Rude. 
12 — Johannes Grebill. 
IS— Nieholas Miller. 
14_ fredorieh AValder. 
15 — Christine Strickkr. 
16 — Johannes ReiiTendorfE 
17— lYter Reiffendorf. 
18— fredcrick* Brunt (?) 
19 — George Kraiist. 
20— Philipp DaleiL 
21— Marsrarethe Dalen. 



340 Forojrars who arrived at Philadelphia, 1701-1792. 

22— Niclinlaus Dalcn. 32— Anna Bolman. 

23 — Barbara Ilersticn: 33— Catharine letiber. 

24— Jacob Ebel. 34— Raatje lefieber. 

25 — Jacob Xickokus. 35 — Rooje van Aaken. 

26 — Gertrout Eaherteri. 36 — Carolina Gotic. 

27 — Phillipinc Zerwiine. 37 — Aloj.in de leiitante. 

28 — Christina Otenhcimer. 38 — George Struekler. 

29 — Margareth o Becker. 39 — Bernard Spier. 

30— Carl Hollenberger. 40— Christian Ernst Lax. 
31 — Willielmina llolienber- 



Americans. 

Johannes llaslein. Wendel Serwin. 

August Braim. Christ* Schneider. 

September 22, 1792. Martin Jager. 

List of Passengers on board the Brig " Martha," Cart. 
Ebenezer IIoyt, from Amsterdam. 

Mr. Charles Whanbert, Cabin Passenger. 
Charles Lewis Baumann, Steerage do 
Heinrich Abelmann, do do 

Hermann Diedrich Bicmar do do 
Franz Lasser, do do 

Bohe Bohlens | American — ' 
Sept. 22, 1702 EBENR HoYT. 



List of Passengers on Board the Ship u Fame,'" Cai r. 
Aeexr. Eraser, from Rotterdam. 

Barbara Jungedius. Eliza Godmaning. 

Andrew Schusler. John Schlough. 

Eliza Schusler & two children Andrew Zehn. 

Nicholas Schh'vger. Catharine Margaret Trunk- 

Ann Margaret Schusler, ing. 

Margaret Schusler, Catharine Urinsf. 

John SttttF, George Schicver. 

Christopher IIofiutgeL 
Andreas Dieterick. 



Foreigners who arrived at Philadelphia, 2791- 1792. 341 

John Bcum k his wife Beum Dorothy Jordon. 

k one chikl. Susan Jordon. 

John Bever. Henry Jordon. 

Casper Znler. John Mercliolin & his wife. 

John Quilman. John Mercheliu, Jun*. 

Balzar llartmann. Christian Mercheliu, 

Talentine Bejer. Ann Junkin. 

John Beyer. Jolm Mum. 

Jolm Keitznor k his wife k Valentine Vatholt. 

two children. Casper Vatholt. 

Nicholas Jnc-er k his wife Dorothy Vatholt. 

Anna Marie one chikl. Maria Vatholt. 

Dolly 'Wooclmakcrin. Ami Richterin. ' 

John Sehanhcri?;en. Andrew Krumlich. 

Christian Hoffman. John Xeuman. 

John Hoffman. Margarett Burgedin k one 

Nicholas Loresch & liis wife child, 

k one child. Catharih Croming. 

Mek'hoir Hock & his wife. Jacob Slayger. 

Ann Margarethc Hock. William B. Euler. 

Michal Hock. Ann Catherin Euler. 

Henry Hock. Berder Slauch & his wife. 

Valentine Hock. John Slauch. 

Casper Hock. John William Slauch. 

John Andrew Hock. John Riticher & his wife. 

John Ziner & his wife. ' Catharin Riticher. 

Jolm Ziner Jun r . ' John Riticher. 

Ann Marirarett Ziner. Eva Kvertine. 

Zigmond Zener. Margaret! llartmann. 

Catherin Zener. George Jungcr & wife. 

Eberharden Zener. Barbara Junger. 

John Zener. . Casper Junger. 

John Zener. John Slcygar & wife. 

Nicholas Jordon & his wife. Catharin Sleygar. 

Eliza Jonlon. Valentine Slcygar. 

Ann Margarett Jordon. Michael Hitickcn. 

John Jordon. Andrew Scherck, 



342 Foreigners who airitcd at Philaddjrfua, 1701-170:*. 

John Adam B cum. Christian Frederick. 

Christian Bonnet. John David Kcsler. 

Eliza Moedine. Christopher "Walker. 

Barbara Lossin k child. Ludwig Simmons k his wife 
John Wytzel & his wife. Eve. 

John "Wytz&l. JoIju Simmons. 

Conrad AYytzel. Frederick Simmons. 

John Anton Brand. Peter Simmons. 

Conrad Killrnan. Mel choir Simmons. 

Antron- Trnppertin. Gahriel Simmons. 

John Ludwig Giphart. Catherin Simmons. 
Sept. 23, 1702. 



Da Coud ray's "Observations on the Delaware Forts" 343 



DU COUDRAY'S "OBSERVATIONS OX THE TOUTS IN- 
TENDED FOE THE DEFENSE OF THE TWO PAS- 
SAGES OF THE IXVTER DELAWARE," JULY, 177T. 1 

Fort at Billings port. 

1. As to the Situation, it is well-chosen, it commands the 
River in the narrowest Fart I have seen, and is the most 
capable of Defence. 

2. As to the Plan or Projection, it is very had. The Ob- 
ject in View ought to have been to defend the Chain of 
Chevaux de Prize, which bar the River. For that Purpose 
30 or 40 Cannon, well placed, would have been sufficient. 
The Edge of the Scarp would have afforded room enough; 
it was therefore necessary to shut the Gorge of the Battery, 
bo that the Enemy might be obliged to land and open 
Trenches, in order to take Possession of it. And in the 
particular Circumstances in which this Fort was begun, it 
was necessary in 6 weeks or 2 months to have had some- 
thing finished to answer the End proposed. But to com- 
plete it agreeable to the present Circumstance, and to finish 
the Half-moon necessary to command the Hightli on the 
opposite side of the River, would require at least four or 
five Months, provided it were well constructed and a great 
number of Men were employed, in as much as the Soil is 
the most unfavourable that can be mot with. 

Besides the Length of Time, which the Plan of this Work 
would require in the present situation of Affairs, another In- 
convenience attends it, which is, that it would require for its 
Defense, a more numerous Garrison than could be spared from 
the Army. For it would require at least 2000 Men: as, 
from the Badness o^ the soil, the Enemy's Cannon would 

1 Manuscript in collection Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 



344 JJu Coudr<"js "Observations on the Ddawatt Forts" 

soon make groat Destruction, which must be repaired every 

Xight, to prevent the works from being stormed. 

3. As to the execution of tJiese Works, I find it to lie 
without Judgment. The Planks and Piles to support the 
sand are not half thick enough. The Piles instead of beinz 

inclined to hear against the Bank, have been fixed perpen- 
dicular and are already overturned. Instead of placing 
the Batteries destined to fire on the 1 liver, on the Border of 
the Scarp, they have placed them 7 or S Fathoms back, 
which removes them farther from their Ohject, and exposes 
them to the Enemy's attempt at the Bottom of the Scarp. 
And suppose the Works completed, only one 'Piece of 
Cannon can do Execution. Instead of making use of the 
Ground which forms the Border of the Scarp and which is 
firm on the superfices, and supported at least for some 
Depth by the Roots of Trees which grew there, they have 
raised a great Part of the Breastwork with loose Band in 
the manner before mentioned, and have taken the Trouble 
to sink a Ditch, which might have been spared, as the Scarp 
answered the Purpose. From whence it appears that no 
Dependence can be put upon this Work, as it cannot be 
finished in Time and requires too great a Number of Men 
and Artillery for its Defense. 

To defend the Chain of Chevaux de Prize which bars the 
River opposite to the Fort, all dependence for the present 
must be on the Floating-Batteries and Gondolas which are 
ready, or. which can-soon be so. Some bsc, however, can be 
made of a Part of the Fort, of which we have been speak- 
ing; and for this Purpose there should be a Battery : 
in each of the two Deini-Bnsrions on the side of the River. 
And by cutting those two Demi-Bastions by the Gorge and 
the angle of the Flank, they will each he transformed into 
a Redoubt with four Fronts. Each of these Redoubts 
may be secured against a Coup do Main by covering tl 
with a double Ditch and Pallisades in the Bottom of the 
Ditch. It will then be necessary to le\ el all those Pal 
the Fort which may serve to cover the K-'Omy. These two 



Da Coudray's "Qhsermtions on the Delmcare Forts." 345 

Works l>y means of 1500 or 2000 Labourers well directed 
may be executed in 20 Days: and in my Opinion this is 
all that can be done in the present situation of affair*. 

I would advise to hazard in those Redoubts only 400 or 
500 Men with 25 or 30 Pieces of Cannon, still observing 
that it is not upon them, but on the Floating Batteries sup- 
ported by these Redoubts that the Defense of the Chevaux 
de Frize depends. 

In times less urgent than the present, a better use might 
be made of this Place, but by reason of the Badness of the 
Soil nothing solid can be constructed but by extreme 
expense. 

Unless shoal Water prevents the Enemy from jroinrr to the 
opposite side of the River, it will be necessary to construct 
on the opposite Island another Battery of 15 or 20 Guns 
which must also be fbrriiied. This may be performed with 
little Expense on account of the Goodness of the Soil and 
the Facility of making use of the River to cover it by wide 
and deep Ditches. 

The Fort. 

The Fort is badly situated ; the Battery which forms it3 
principal object is improperly directed, which render.- Half 
the Guns useless. The Embrazures are badly constructed, 
too open on the inside, and not sufficiently open without: 
some are directed obliquely without any motive; the inte- 
rior Slopings arc too straight, and by this means begin 
already to tumble down. 

This Fort cannot prevent the Passage of the Enemy, and 
when they have passed, it ean be of no use ; consequently it 
can answer no valuable Purpose, 

Fort of Itcd-bank. 

This Fort is better conceived, directed, and executed than 
either of those above mentioned. It does the more lion. un- 
to Colonel Bull; as he had no other assistance than natural 
good sence unenlightened by Theory, This is perceivable 



34G Da Coudrafs "Observations on the Ddnwarc Fort.*." 

from a View of it. There ore indeed Faults in the Plan, 
and in the Execution, but they do not render it useless as 
the two former Forts. If we may judge by the Proportion 
of the work already finished, it is reasonable to expect the 
whole will be in a State of Defence in the course of a Fort- 
night. What unfortunately renders this Fort of little or no 
Consequence is this; its object is, and can be, no other than 
to prevent the Enemy from taking possession of the Highth 
upon which it is placed, in order to establish Batteries and 
thereby oblige the Gallics and Floating Batteries employed 
in supporting the Chain of Ohevaux de Frizc, to retreat. 
But this case could never happen, unless the Enemy should 
be exposed to a Fire from the Floating Batteries and Gal- 
lies, which they could not silence with their ships. This 
would oblige them to land Men and Artillery, to occupy by 
Force the Highth in question, and then fire on the Floating 
Batteries and Gallics occupied in supporting the Chain. 
But the situation of the Place will not permit such an idea; 
for the Biver is here so wide that if the States had four 
times as many Gallics, Ships and Batteries as they have at 
this place and above it, the Enemy, we must think, would 
still have a superior Fire, as the width of the Biver would 
allow them to employ a greater number oi^ Ships. If by 
this means, they succeed in beating oil the G allies and 
Floating Batteries, it cannot be supposed they will put them- 
selves to the Trouble oi 1 landing to attack Colonel Ball's 
Fort. Therefore I look upon this Fort as useless with re- 
spect to the Object for which it was intended, viz., to con- 
tribute in obstructing the Passage, of the Biver, and pre- 
venting the Enemy from possessing tho Highth it commands. 
This Passage is much too wide to be defended by the preseut 
means. I would therefore advise to carrj all the means of 
Defense to the Passage at Biliingsport This place is in- 
comparably more capable oi^ support, and it is better to make 
a respectable stand in one place than to defend two in an 
indifferent manner. The Gallics and Floating Batteries 
removed thither, will make up for the insufficiency of the 



Da Gmdray's "Observations on the Delaware Forts" 3 17 

intrenched Battery, which I would propose to substitute in 
place of the present Fort, and of that which I shall think 
ought to he erected at the Point of the Island, the River 
being much narrower in tins place than in that of which we 
have been speaking. The Gallics and Batteries may more 
easily make Head against the Enemy who will not he able 
to make so great a Fire, and will he obliged to bear a much 
nearer one, and better supported, than could be opposed to 
them at Red Bank. The Cannon at this Fort might partly 
serve for the Batteries at Billingsport, I would not, how- 
ever, advise to demolish the Bait cry at Bed Bank, but to 
leave there two or three of the poorest of the Cannon. 

I would also advise to remove from this Line no more 
Chevaux dc Frizc than would be judged necessary to secure 
by three Bows, the Bassage of Billingsport 

I also advise to preserve Colonel Bull's Fort. Thereby you 
may induce the Enemy to believe they would have a second 
Lino of obstacles to encounter, after they had surmounted 
the first; and besides for another Reason, which appears to 
me a very important one especially in the present Circum- 
stances of Affairs, the Government would escape the Censure 
iiiconsideration and mistakes, which the evil-minded are 
always ready to pass, and the People to adopt, when they 
sec "Works which hove been erected with much Labour and 
Expense pulled down. For the same Reason I would pro- 
pose to preserve in Colonel Jones's Fort, all that will not be 
of service to the Enemy in case they should attack the Re- 
doubts, which I think ought to be substituted in place of 
this Fort. 

My Thoughts on the above subjects as here expressed, 
seem the better founded, as they nppearcd to conform with 
the Ideas of General Arnold, to whom 1 had the Honour to 
communicate them, as far as the difference of Language 
would permit; and also with those of Mr. Duer and Mr. 
Shea by whom I had the advantage of being understood, 

[1777.] ^ l Coudrat. 



348 Skip Register* for the Port of PMadclph^ 1726-1 



i tc z 



c 

85 £ * s § == 

-'. X. * 2 2 5b 






- e O M g p: =s c ^ o Oi *~ 



0—^0 



o " 



o 3 



tc &S5 



-* ~ Ck ^ -cs C O > 






- £ I x 9 



ss 5 



a 

P 

K 3 <5 



Cm n 



O 

u 

o 

w 
M 

o 

s 



!■ 2;^ 



w — ~C ._ t3 



U2 W 



cq m u ^ 

-5 £ 2 o 

gl § ? 

»~a C H 



c/: 



s o 



8 8£ 

^ ^ c 



Ship Pepsters for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



349 



fc 



% 



. 




P 


« 




£ 


p* 




o 






O 


cf 




o 


c 


G 
> 


2 


"■*-> 


c 




X 




o 




o 




"C 


o 




^3 


(h 


o 


Q 


ft 


ft 



ft 






o 



pq 



fcu 



3 q P4 5 



C> S3 



c =: 

C~t E3 z> ~ ~. rr 

~ 3 ^ | j3 ■ js 

t3 >4 & P< 

c o -5 o *=i o 



x |* i: '^ 3 £ 3 3 „S X' ~ = 









e tc 
c c 



pRoSoiha) W 



.2 bo c *j 



co — 



H H 



■2 


*3 




-2 

■+-3 

o 


To 




>3 


S 




d 




o 




c; 




o 




"a, 


^3 


£ 


o 


H 


P 


X 



o 


cJ 




> 


5; 


o 


C 


o 


CO 


ei 


Q 




-a 

CO 






to 


^ 


CH 


o 


c~ 


3 

CO 


p^ 


'A 



PQ X. 



CO 



CO 




c 
o 

CO 


^ 
cs 




CO 


a -a 


'y 


s: 



ex 

8 

CO 



ac 



x 



s 

CO 

c 
CO 



350 Ship Registers for (he Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 



»-J o 



a -=. o 



6 



w 

o 
c 



g ° 

- o 
H 

Si 
co 



o £'.2 5 



o 
to 

CO 

3 

H 
co 

>-< 

O 

w 



>, 




r- 


rf 




** 


^ 


>> 


o 




o 


01 




£ 


fi 


© 


o 


c3 


s i 


>— 


,3 


ci 


• * 


o 


o 




Q 



E^£ 



^ 


^ 




c; 


*-. 


j_ 






t- 


»- 








T. 






















o 


£ 


r* 


ta 


~ 


«- 


CJ> 


"Z 


U-< 


~ 


c 


vT 


CO 


o 


a 


o 


*J 


o 


p3 


c. 


^ 


.- 


u 






o 
o 

co 


X 


C 


> 

2 












o 


Cij 


o 


o 


5 


"•"* 




tn 


■£j 


■*-• 


o 


.- 




M 


>■ 


^ 


1—4 


-3 



C-r — 



I & S -a 1 ^ -I n ,& | g 

Cr ri «! S3 - — "^ i~ < _, i rt *^ e 
£> i* iS? £^ IP •< . ? ;2 w c - C 



j— < 
O 

5 



- r? O - 

^ 5 2 c 5 i,6 7 

8 o s.'ilil^ 

P3 P co < ?■ Ph 



J? ° 



P-: CO i-i 



R 33 



u 

o 
R 
o 
O 

*£> 
CO 






W 



>■* 



ex, 



CO 



o 
O 

o 
o 



c 
o 

CO 






^ PM -s 

is o ° 






> o S 



CO 



? c e 



o ^ ~ rn 



a ^^ 



c g 

If 



p g .S 

CO 2 e 






cT* 



*" &4 P 

^ CO ^ 

3 -9 sc 



5 o rs 



c: 



ca *a 



f ? & .1! rr 



h4 i £ . 1 c * 






Skip Betters for (he Fort of FMaddphla, 172G-1775. 



Sol 



o 


o 




r-< 


^3 




O 


s 




1 


■1 






& 




P 




"a 


o 


a 





ft 


o 




CO 


"to 


o 








S 


JS 


6 


t£ 




O 


o 

. -1 


s 





o © 

Tj< CO 



O 4g 

O 2 



c 
o 

W 

3 






I 












ft c3 

* s ^ *§ 



I p "3 



rt t> O 

S >Tl "., ^ H'S" H £j _j S rd 5 

«m 2 v a S ^ -5 «ja T ^ I - 



02 2h5 



CO 

•a 

i 



CO 






°> 



o 

to 

a 

Hi 



22 22 



CO 



» O J^ 









e h 



S 

to 

c 



y JZ5 Ph 

BE . ,- 



c> 




* 




•X3 




o 




o 




ft 




CQ 


•H 


h 


d 


o 
C 


>J 


o 


ft 


o 


o 


,a 


o 


o 




CO 


55 


fr- 


iC 


l-H" 


c<» 


>» 


> 










B 




t-a 


>-i 



o 


(4 


ci 


o 


P-. 




^ 


o 






o 


N 


« 




3 


CO 


-»J 


Q 


"to 


o" 




c 


In 




>— » 


to 



to 

p 

< 



u. 



«3 



I 

CO 



352 Ship Btyiiicfs for the Port of PftUadeiphm, 1720-1775. 



5 fr- 
ig ° 






"* ? 



fc t 



6 



^ 



^ © 



= O 



^» 




1) 

£ 


rt 


•^ 


j» 






6j 


to 






-*-> 


■Si 


03 




a 


O 


fe 


^ 



6 £ £ £ i # jz ~'Z 



3 CO Gfc 



i £4 P e 
a 2 2 S 

r^ 6 5 h 



6 

c .2 

O ^2 






^ 



fe 


»-5 


o 




^ 




tf 




c 


r— < 


fH 


js IS 




5 w 


K 


■j. r* 


« 


'^ f^i. 


H 


T. 




O 


r^>. 


■s. 


t— » 




o 




fo 




^5 


o 
,3 


R 


8 


r."< 




>— i 




H 


r 


co 


c^ 


►— < 




O 


*~ " 


w 


5 ^ 


« 





OO ri & t> 75 3 > /? 

CO rH r- O CO P- »-5 



Ph a 3 



•C" A 5 ~ "5 



M i£ 





fc-> 


J_ 


ci 


<X) 


5^ 


-»J 




g 


a 


.a 


o 

Ih 


O 


o 


*a> 


^ 












o 




05 


ci 




02 


t^5 



o 



cc 



X 



>. 



&l 


r— « 





— > 








V£ 


a 




J3 


*n 


CO 


» 


<* 







<M 


, 




> 


«j 






fe 


»-\ 



BG 



00 



Skip Rccjista'S for the Port of Philadelphia, 172G-177& 353 



eg 


o 






o 


•*? 


r-l 


CO 


i 




tr» 




1? 








© 


| 


£ 








u 




D 




a 




5 


« 


►3 




. o 






ha 


£ 




► 




*i3 


> 


o 


rf 


5 




Q 


o 


£ 


13 

a, 


o 




5 


>^ 


cJ 




73 






o 




"3 

'a 




o 


3 
.a 


^-1 


la 


o 


**" 


^x ' 


o 


o 


Ph 


fe 




O 


O 






.11 







*d 








-J 






^ 








15 






% 


"T? 






fi, 








o 












£ 




£ 




o 


.5 




13 


s 


'CJ 

< 


Tc 


s? 


p 


o 


r* 


£ 


£ 


c»h 


<; 


^ 


jH 


ej 


"~, 


00 


c 


a 




O 




s§ 


o 


p2 


6 


O 




> 


J> 


5 




►"5 


H» 




IS 


C#" 


i-s 





£ :S "H -— 5^ •: ^ ?-< »? r -1~ £ -^ *3 x«m ss 

r - c * C 2 ** - "^ *? ^ C ° ° Si 15 



P=h Ph h O P= 



•^ EC 



CQ 



£ -3 ^ >3 "S 

o o o 



o 
o 



•8 





o 




J 


O 


W 


^-i 


2 


^» 


o 




c 


a: 




C 


c 


o 


•-a 


►-a 


O 



f>, 


>> 


T 




o 




p 


g - 


'i 


(h 


3 


i_ 




Ph 




o 


•»-> 


«■> 


o 


"to 


a 






X 


rH 


c? 


CO 


•■* 


oj 


--. 


o 


> 


tJ 


a> 


c 




Q 


•; 


c < 



X 



X 


o 

cc 


04 


^ 


C^ 


*"* 


C 





VOL. XXIV. — 2o 



354 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 17 20-1775, 



2 5 



p 

o 
3 



a 

a 

K 
P 
<J 

P 

w 

O 






SQ 



| 

O El 

a 5 J § ** 

« * -s ^ -a 

S ° o ° 5 

# o ^> 



o 
O 



^3 

P 



•58 O « 






! 
I 

o 



Q 
a 

o 



fe 



^ ^ e. u 






DQ 



o3 

S § t i i 

3 » el -, -r 5 b 

; = O C ^ 2 > 

S ^ >> 2 2 * »~ 7n ^ 



:~ ■S & 



EG ,- C 
£ P »-a hs 



O o 



£ H P h5 W »-a 



8 

O 
P 

w 



> 

o 

V-i 



OQ 



£ 



-a 

3 

i-i 

o 

| 

£ 



CO 

o 
w 

p 



DO 



w 

p 



o 

1-1 

O 



o 

c 



Ship Registers for the Port of Pklbj.lJphia, 1726-1775. 



o 


o 




o 


*-• 


8.§ & 




Cn» 




•;r> g _o 








sj c/T tf> 




Cj 




■a 




p* 




© ^ o 






rt 


,43 O c) 

"2 tfi "S 


M 


o 

D 




r- r- > 


c_) 


&* 

"o 


£S£ 


3 


r-t 




III 


© 


3 

i-4 


3 


cJ 




VH 


Ph 


H 




rt 



■o 




o 












© 


c< 




*» 












ca 


J^ 




3 


© 


.rr 


if. 


© 






1 




"5? 


^ 


55 


5 






CJ 






r '-- 




O 


>- 4 






o 


O 

1-4 


X 


" 


«-. 


© 


3 






to 


g 


© 


<_ 


£ 


m 










5j 


5 


fcc 


"> 


1 " 




fc, 






*<y 




s 


T. 


r5 


^ 


© 


^ 


53 


P 


£? 


3 


Z-I 




j 


'"S 


•— 


c 


o 


5 


© 


Q 




an 


5 


5" 


g 


d 


V 


*^> 


>, 


«_ 


b 


g 


~~S 


r^ 


O 


r-'4 


o 


J=i 


O 


o 


w 


"2 






3 


















H 












PM 



ft .3 

© C^ 

I c 2 



r* © 



© 5 -ii 



5 | P. * & ** c ~ | -g I H 

^ S § ^ ° 'H a P* t S: 9 y 

5 >-» .2 ** *? -S ■— ^ ~ —' •' 

- •- *-< ^j -^ g x SB ^ -^ O 5 g -^ ^ 



c3 

| | 1 1 8 f 
£ '< £ 1 1 = S 

r 5 &* « 



X ^ "3 
a — T3 
5 S «s 



ss6 






^ H J 



a 
o 



. ^ 



CG 



cr. 



W 



-./. 



to 



§• 
» 



356 Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 17 20-171 o. 






P 



o 

o 
« 






.-= O •- 



p.- 








o 




e 


<» 








C4 




rr 


3 


i--. 






_^ 


S 




y 


#■— 


M 




~ 


.-'■ 




5; 




6 




r. 

r-i 


fcfl 






>-H 


56 




o 


r^: 




© 


£& 


u, 






> 








O 






k" 




































t- 








c 


hi 


'£ 


J 


£ 


X 


2 


<i 


9 


"C 


-3- 


<£ 




"« 


4s 


O 


o 
-«-> 




© 


>. 


r| 
















H 








H 




H 



* , -2 

Si ~ - c 

O i^ — 

*3 



p*3 



r=3 



o # z 



- 9 5 = 2: 






r-S •- "2 



:r ^. "^ ._ 



fa 

s 



P ^t i-t j* «£ »-* —j 3 ,-, ^1 



— < ^ '*"' 






Si d 

1° 






to 



,3 o 3 r^ 

►3 < < £ 






C 



fo 


O 

r o 
O 
o 



8 W 



^ ^ O 



02 


s 


C 


P4 


o 


£ 


w 


C^ 


o 


CO 




'"Z5 



o a 



P3 x 



M 


St 


'J 


> 


6 


Ji 




Q 






B 


> 


C 


C 


"7* 


B 


n 


aj 



X 



;/. 



M fell 



Ship Registers for the Port of PkUatklphia, 172G-1775. 357 



o © 

© 1-1 



C - 13 






o 



c 5 

** ^a 5> 
H 



* Si 



to £> 



c o 






,3 



>* "75 f>> ~ <? S 












►*-» .^ rri o _ t-: Hi © C3 -^ T 



>«»_ R »H 2 ,* |j X ST 33 C t^« •--• %_, —t^- C«„ »- t>_ X _ C C 



s 






c 




t c 






O 








.3 


^ 




~ 


R 


"9 


d 




& 


^> 


•^f 


f 


■j 



"i te 



W « Jk; £ £ £ « £ 



£i 



ya o ,3 o -c o r=; -^ -© -=: 
o o c ^ c o 



.--- t=< 



?H o J/2 





>> 




ei 


*3 


0) 


o 


*-. 


s 


o 


1 


g 
3 


s 




o 


•— < 


-a 
H 


P 


t^» 












© 




Ch 


*o 


to 


Sj 


e 


a 


*£ 


c< 




CO 1 


,3 


t- 


o 




*a 


© 


V; 


© 




JC 




DC 


CO 


CO 


N 


C-J 


to 


fci 


3 




< 


»> 





a . 


&> 


>> 


i_ 


3 


O 

•>- 


eq 




s 


g 


5 


"© 

c 










j^ 






V" 1 


ci 




© 


*^ 


£ 


^ 


£ 


« 


< 



c 


^> 




~ 


3 


^ 


73 




> 


C 












t: 


-<^ 


QD 






> 








> 


*■■ 




C-i 




•— 


o 


^ 




x 


c 


c 


pgj 


^ 


_x 


— 


cc 


cc 


J} 


X? 


Otl 



cc 



EC KJ ^: 



358 Ship Registers for the Port of P/uladelphia, 1720-1775. 






to 












m 


.2 


> 


. 2 




*a5 


«., 


*d 


c 


C3 










>» 


^3 


^ 


ft 



o 



-q o 

ft £ 



p 


*o 

§ 

6 








1 i = 


1— ( 




3 3 ^ 


ft 




S £ Ji 


Pm 






O 






H 






« 






O 




O 


fc 


63 


X 


w 


J 


£ 


w 


S 


g 


H 




.§ 


ft 1 




5 


O 




► 


s 






w 






H 






a 




|-H 


u 


s 


>> 


K 


£ 


M 


a 


£ 




ft 




a 


H 




o 
o 


CO 




QQ 







pd 








s3 
















"3 








^3 


r— ' 


48 


99 










I 






"ri 


"o 


© 

c 


3 


^ 




■ 




I* 


" 




o 


o 


15 
ft 

Cm 
O 




5 


S 


X 

CJ 


rt 


t- 


a: 

V 




S3 


J 


g 


£2 


s 


~c 


IS 


J 


cc 


tn 


o 




g 

_5 


o 

^3 


3 

•J2 








o 


"© 


Ka 


c 






rJ 








M 










O 

P 

b 






o 

S3 

s 

o 








o 
.2 




< 






cs 












j3 




S3 




















1 




£ 







- c; ^ a 



o 



»-. 

o 

I 
ft 



c 


►d 


o 


C5 


«-. 


^ 


c 


a 






£>. 


t ~ 


r-~ 


H- < 


*J 


£ 


*r,° 








*C 


gj 


ft 


X 


o 


o 


CO 






o 


o 


^ 



"I 



£> 5 



2 

I 



o 






a as 



Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 1726-1775. 359 



s 




\B 


ci 


3< 


"bo 


*© 


►H 


m 


© 


& 


•tJ 


'& 


O 


Ph 


Ph 






■© 

Ph 



o 

o 

o 
cr. 

c/3 



o 



P 

to 

c a to 

a M 
go a 

P • PQ 



>> o 



! 


© 


ft 


C 


^d 


a3 


V 


-i~» 


a 


cJ 



«d 
"© 

s 3 

Ph £ 

© ^ 

o 2 

^ I 



c: © 

ja a 



P fc A 



I' 

eJ 



C3 

PS 

to 



r">^ 



~ a « c ^ 3 51 ,3 

^s » ° ^ £ -§ ~ 



£ O o « i 



I 6 



© cJ 

^ en 



© 



.s *>-3 a 



S ^4 'g 



?^ 5 P ~ P <^ » vy 
o 3 

51 






^Si> g 



© r^; -3 '-tr 



a p- 



,M 



P 



© 
B 1 



»- 



© 

O 

*© 

M 

M 



>. 

© 



O 



o 

& 

o 

© 





© 


© 


3 


s 


r^ 


-*J 


& 


~tp 


© 


'V, 


^© 


PQ 


55 


o 


«* 


m 


(M 






► 


► 


© 


© 


fc 


fe 



< s 

1° J* 

« 02 



O 
d 

w 



© 



Q * 



GO 



i 



360 



Ship Jlqfisters far the Port of Philadelphia, 17-2G-1775, 





«j 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 




& 


o 


o 


i 


•o 


o 


1 

"a 


iC 


•e 


| 




& 


JEJ 






Q 




*> 








*3 










><> 




.5 
IS 


o 
o 


p 

o 


15 


.5 


© 


.2 


o 




O 




»^* 


*o 


*<D 


T. 


*c3 


1 




nr 


-- 


o 


•a 


'O 


O 


Ȥ 


1 




Cj 


O 


45 




d 




si 


o 




»— « 

13 


si 




2 


15 


y 


15 






£< 


£ 


O 


Pm 


Ph 


6 


P-. 


r-i 




































e* 


















t- 



























ja 


















d 


























rSi 








£ 










3 












ee 








H 

Pw 

P 

p 


•0 

1 




he 

.5 

> 
8 

S 


Pm 

Cm 

O 


•J- 

"a 
o 
o 


C3 


53 

'5 

CO 


Oh 
C 
oa 

O 


c 

PS 


15 


g 




P-, 
Cm 


+3 

O 
X 


"5 


X 


3 


r5 


15 


-4-> '^ 

E •£ 




1 


h- 1 

p* 




E 
c 

H 


o 




O 


to 
CJ 


CO 

o 


Em 

O 


^~~l 


3 

3 


O 


S 


o 


t-, 


u. 


Q 
f— i 


O 


^: o 


Ph 


o 


O 




o 




•"3 




B3 
>0 




1-5 




i? 


5 

CO 




5 




o 


<; 




c 
►■a 


O 




H 














































P3 








































c 






O 

►h 


v. 

V;; 

1 


o 






o 

C 








o 




o 
o 






CO 

1 




1 








.1 

R 
o 






IS 

O 




o 






1 








.2 

II 

P^ 




•-5 
















1 

o 






co 












* 




















































e 




























H 






































B 






CO 




C 














ul 










o 


















5 


1 

JO 








b 

o 








o 














5-» 

"5 
S3 








1 










< 

"to 






g 








i-i 

C 

o 
o 










O 










1 






j/j 




o 






15 

CO 
o 

R 








w 

C/J 

o 
P 










o 












o 
CO 

CO 

fc — 
si ~C 







Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 17-20- 



3C1 



s 






•J> 






o 






*S» ID 






"-~ c 












* 5 












© r- 






^ l 












g g 


^ 








5 Ph 


^ 


-M 


th 


c_ 


T_ 


v* c> 




o 


gfl 


c? 


> 


2 «- 


rt 


> 


i ° 


2 


© 


H 


Ph 


•& 



c 











.5 




























»a 






rt ,-, 








CV 




tii 
























o 

r 3 


—. 


•g 


"c3 .•£ Js 




S3 


Ih 


> ■""• 


a> 


" 


^-S a^ 


§ 


o 


© 


© -S 


£ 


"J 


."£ rS 02 O 


£ 


© 


~7 

© 


c g 


£ 


rz 


.7 -^ ^ TJ 






r- 1 


"" «*-! 






to Ph b ^ 


»-5 


& 




© w 


*3 


^H 


PJ <~< 3 fe 




o 
cr. 


5 




s 


~o 


£ g S 


O 


< 


> 


to 





o 



P4 CC r£ 







"fl 






C-< 






Oh 






















c 


*© 




o 


"3 


O 




^3 




cr. 


"■^ 




© 


,2 


T. 




» 




C 


r: 


>. 


«-. 


•J2 


<t~ 


^ 


•jj 




© 


r~ 


^p 


^ 


f»^ 


CJ 




■p 


o 


0C 

♦j 


*© 


o 


h3 

s 


"3 


< 

1-. 




o 

r3 




a 










O 


o 




















o 


^ 


c 


pj 


rz 


~ 


,r> 


J^ 


^ 


,o 


o 




t> 






o 


C3 

•-5 
















PJ 


















o 












O 

(3 






73 












C 






C 












c> 






o 












tt 






Q 


















E 












-~ 






CJ 







o 
c 

GQ 



© 



to 



O 

C5 



| 

J 
a) 



g 

C 

c 



or 



362 Shi]) Betters for the Port of Ph'dadclphia, 1726-1775 



S o 



£ 2 



385 


i> 


>> 




*g 






""-" 








a 
i 


g 






. *o 






c 












>: 


















\6 




o 




*^ 






S 












fc 




p-t 






M 








1 






















I 

CO 






















Cs| 






















t~ 






















T-H 






























ej 




g 

s 








ri 




1 




d 


5* 




2 








^5 

'a 


K 


5 


rz^ — • 




rz 




^-j 


._, 


f; 


P 

M 


6 


a 

S3 

►k 


cJ 


5 § 


X 


^ 




a 


5q 


o 


K-t 








Is b 








o 






ft 




g 


e-J 




aa 


s 


J 




J 


*3 






s 


5 




o 




O 


o 


o 




fc 




to 


Hj 


6 


K-; 




►"5 


r-l 


>-} 





•-3 

To 
a 






o ° 

2 o 
g!0 



.5 



ha 



=* ._ »- « j} p a _- 

o — rr! '^ > a 3 <5 c 



o jc - 



o 






S- — . 

O "3 



O Cn C >» 



O 



~ o 



ri U 

Ha 



»-M ^J 



8 © 



■8 

W 

"S 
3 

m 



rt 

H 

! 



DC' 

S 

w 

H 
EC 

M 

o 
w 



en 

-J 

to 



=3 



1 

r 

CO 






Ship Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, 172G-1775, 



c<» 


o 


r- < 


CO 


r3 








Jj 


o 


*5? 


Cj 


>- < 


«£ 


o 


• c3 




"o 


o 


p 


si 


d 




o 


1f 


tT 


o 


o 


pi 


o 


5 


rd 


& 


■p 



Id 




o 


o 


o 






o 


o 


} 




-<r 


»— ; 


ge 






CO 


o 












*~'*1 




u 






















CO 

p 










2 




| 












*3 










s 








H 


67 




P 




£ 






5-^ 




^ 


"Jy 


o 




p 




<Ti 




5J 




*- 


» 


£j 






?, 


2 

be 




- 


g 


Tc 


3 


















o 


X 


t< 


^3 


^ 


o 


N 


. 


•— 


TJ 






5 


> 




(h 


Hj 


s 


:? 


g 


*~ 


•j 


o 


J 


'"""' 


"* 


tT* 


,^ 


CO 




Ph 


£ 


^ 






r"~ 


pH 























© 


o 
4 










d 








e2 




6 ji 






o 


m" 




©< 
O 


V 


P'» 


rf 


t- 


pj 




C 


a 




x 
03 

rt 
o 

© 


3 

-a 

O 




6 


c? 

M 

X 

55 

a 


-4J 

a 

BE 

O 


d 


X 

© 
"el 


pq 


c 
.»- .- 

£« ri 

< o 


© 
X 

EC 




Ph 

d 


© 

< 

si 


L!3 

M 

Cm 

O 


O 

»— i 

c? 
o 


33 

l-c 




x 

^> 

o 

Hi 



-8 E: L 



- c^ I 
3 3 o 



o 



-a 



o 



^ 



>, 

o 
PQ 



be 


^-, 


















e 


^ 


c 


o 


»^< 


c^ 


P4 


<-> 


c 


• .*~p 


o 


Im 


5q 


w 


*f 


cc 


c^ 




o 


>> 






3 


3 



^J 









>• - O k-4 







53 


CO 




"5 





GQ 



"to 



a. 
OQ 



364 Skip Registers for the Port of Philadelphia, t 



26-1775. 



a 



v d 



S 6 





d . .d 




© ,q 






2 


to- 3 


B 


c: o 


Jg 


*d . 'd 


>-„ 


- © JEH 


*- 

« 


55 Q -3 



*.d 



Ph 



u fcj j* ^ <o 



w 








£ 


x 




O 




p^l 








"^ 


o 


.S 


c£ .S 




►3 

p 
►3 


U 

1 


O 


d 


O 




!'■ 






►r 4 




t-i 


2 






P-i 


"o Ph 


5 o 






Sr 


P 


J5 


d 


o 


§ o 


^3 <_ 

3 ° 


fc 




w 


H 




< 




QD ■ 


fc 


O 


















H 


















tf 




(-1 














O 




o 

2 










o 

o 

.d 


© 




"«5 


"■+J 










■—> 


> 


| 


CO 










s 


r* 


















d 


O 

p4 














1 




^ 


















P5 


















W 


















H 




, 


















l-i 










jfe 


l-l 


o 


"S3 












o 




« 


,s» 












X 


K-4 


^ 




O 










C< 


^ 






5 

o 










~tp 


C 


03 
















CO 









~ >o 



O ^5 /*. f_ 



n o 

£« Q 

d o 

35 3D 



« < H 



EH ^ > ° 
2 § § 6 

5 S 



o 
55 



7. 



7. 



V-, 



Ship Begisters for the Port of PhiloddphMi, 1726-1775. 3G5 



c 


2 


o 


"o 


£ 
















o 




tl 


Ph 



OQ 



« 






K P. 



% B <% "S p. . "** 

o :; C r ~ ^ ,3 O 2 



c3 ci 



»~ t- r* J*^ ^■•- J? S w , — v -ri=: — ~ rt .i -i ~ cs 

t- 1.1I H -i — « ^> "^ - r— - — __ — — rr{ »S , — 

r-. r. -Z. i- "Z. —.— -—.— •-« ..~ r~ •— _*. • — 



o 

s I s *■ ; = --- --- -- - 

s - ~ i ' « ^ — . g 5 r*- **- ^ f 

£ J~ Js *3 ~ :=: ^ Cc^^=": 

>» o o > > J2 c c 

Cm >~5 ^ ^ r- C »^^ 



►5 A i=5 « 



X — 

o o 
>-5 i-a 



c 
o 
o 






© 


© 
© 




> 


> 




o 


«-< 


, 


o 


■4J 


•K 




13 
> 


o 


© 


"© 


>-v 


7. 


w 


O 


Lj 


p? 


o 


O 


r-« 


fe 



^ '^ K-i 



>-5 H 



>■» 




>-• 


b 








1 


*H 


M 


c 




© 


a 




s 

5 


a 


> 


"to 


j^ 


© 


"Z 


OQ 


PQ 


Zfi 


<m 


cc 


X 


•^ 


r ~' 


*■* 






. 


> 


> 


i» 














fc 


ft 


fc 



3 v ^ 



3 
O 



x x c£ x 55 tt 



fc fc ft fc £ G 



366 



Ship M&fist&g for the Port of PMladdphia, T726-1775. 



fc 



I 

CO 



3 



c 
o 









ci 








e? 




























-C 








*a 










;x, 


-i-i 










■a 


















i 


i~l 




-r 






T. 


£> 




6 






7Z 


T'. 


~ 


"J 


.-r 






^~ 


ss 


Z-, 


[_: 


"H 


^ 


£-1 


•— ' 




| 


= s 




x 


X 


T- 


o 








































r- 


>P 




~! 


fl 


g 




o 
© 

6 






g 


t— i 


§ 


cj 

3C 


« 


*~ 


H 


o 


CO 


^ 


►— i 




C 




« 




PS 


~ .5 


Ph 


£ 


►~ < 


-»_> 


*— « 


"tc 



CO 






Notes and Queries. 367 



NOTES AND QUERIES. 

f*otcs« 

Election of Officers of the Historical Society. — The lion. 
Samuel Wliitaker Pennypacker, LL.D., was elected President, and 
William Brooke Rawle, Esq., a Vice-President, at the annual meeting, 
in May last, of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Judge Penny- 
packer succeeds the late Charles J. Stille, LL.D., and Colonel Kawle, 
Judge Pennypaeker, for many years the senior Vice-President of the 
Society. 

Letter of Mrs. Sally Peters to General Anthony Wayne. 

Pbilada. July 2G tU 1777. 
You know not my very worthy freind how much I felt at reading the 
paragraph in Miss drrifiitts's letter relating to me that you could think 
I slighted you or that any thing more agreeable shou'd prevent my not 
writing paind me beyond expression, I liatterd mysellc I had so high a 
place in your good opinion that nothing could displace me, can you not 
forgive your careless freind I alow 1 ought to have wrote long before 
this and thank' d you lor your kind enquiry about my flight last winter 
which you have been inrbrmd was to the House of my late good 
Gaurdain, where his substitute acted as he would have done himsclfe, 
receive with every mark of Hospitality and treated us with all that 
frendship could dictate, but I will say no more about it untill I have an 
opportunity of acquainting you personaly of all our peregrinations 
which ware better than could be expected recoleeting the time of year 
them savages drove us from our peaceful Happy fire sides, to encounter 
hardships we had never known before, (but God tempers the Wind 
said Maria to the shorn Lamb) I anxiously look tor that time to arrive 
when 1 may welcome my friend, to a House where I preside the Happy 
Mistress, and where the Master would equaly rejoice at seeing you his 
Guest — I have sent you in the Waggou ajar of Pickled Oysters 1 hope 
they may get safe to you as 1 fancy they will be a rearity with you, as 
they are so with us. Brother Tom will inform you of what little News 
there is Miss -Griiritts is well ; knows not of this Conveyance or I am 
sure she would have wrote, 1 expected her here this Evening but the 
weather prevented and I dare say Lost you an agreeable letter, M r Peters 
has a violent Headack otherways would have wrote in the leiu of those 
two you must be content with this stupid scriblc of you affectionate 
freind 

SALLIE Peters. 

Benedict Arnold was interested in the following privateer*?, 1777- 
1770 : Ship Mais, < ne thirty-second ; ship Jonathan, ?ul>sequentry the 
McDougal, one-twelfth ; schooner Charming Nancy, one-quarter ; 

schooner General "Arnold, one-quarter ; sloop York, one-quarter ; and 
sloop Active. 



368 Nates and Queries. 

Two entries appear in his business Journal while stationed in Philadel- 
phia, relating to pureha-c- he made lor General Washington : 

1778, July 20. 4 lbs. Green Tea for Gen Washington, £7.10 £30. 0. 

Sept. IS. 1 piece Irish Linneu 21 yds IS 18.18. 

1 " do 20 ytb> 29 3G. 5. 

IS J yds Diaper 9 8. 7. 7 \ 

Gexekal Bexdict Auxold's Family Expenses, 177S-1779, 
selected from his private ledger. — 

Ben Provost's Bill to July 1, 1778, [Steward.] . £ 114.11. 7 

Samuel Sauel's " Hams, 41. 0. 

Abr'm Smith's " Cheese, ..... 4. 9. 4 

Seugrovc " 2 pipes Wine, . .. . 1000. 0. 

" " 20 Loaves Sugar, . . . 274. 0. 

" " 20 \h Green Tea, . ... 195. 0. 

" " 4 Cases Pickles, 

" "2 doz Sweet Oyl, 

Jacob Harman " 7 doz Porter, 

Jos. Stanburv " Table Furniture . . . 1G0.12. 

D& II Mitchell " Glasses & Dishes . ... 24. IS. 

Sauel's " Almonds <.<: Raisins . . . 14 5. 

J as. Bringhurst " Knives & Forks . . . 6. 0. 

Major Clarions " Market expenses I.July to Feb 2 1363.16.10 

Margaret Griffiths " Housekeeper £8. per mo. 

John Godfrey Coachman, 3 mo. . . . 30. 0. 

2 Maids, 2S weeks to Jany 1 1779 . . 56. 0. 

Cook Maid . Cash sundry times . . . 25. 0. 

Miss Clifton, hire of Iter maid Jenny S mo 

Hall- — Hahtley. — Bradford's Pennsylvonia Journal of July 11, 
1787, contains the following marriage notice : 

"Married July 5, at Yorktown, D r James Hall, late of this City to 
Miss Hartley only daughter of Mr. Thomas Hartley of York County." 

The Oxford Township (Philadelphia County) School, 1771. — 
.To the Beneficent Citizens of Philadelphia. 

The Subscribers Freeholders and Inhabitants of the Town-hip of 
Bristol in the County of Philadelphia beg leave to prefer. 

That from a pure desire to promote Learning and Christian Knowl- 
edge amongst their Brethren, they became Principal:? in causing to be ' 
Erected a neat and commodious School House in the said Town-hip for 
the common u=fc of the said Township and the Townships of Oxford and 
the Northern Liberties, open indifferently to every Religious Society ; 
without the least Distinction or Preference whatsoever, upon half an 
Acre of Ground conveyed (Gratis) to them and their Successors forever 
in Trust for the said Purpose, 

That iwt withstanding their greatest Assiduity and Earnestness in 
applying tor Assistance from the Neighbors, many of whom bave been 
very liberal, according to their several Abilities — And That themselves 
have been at so much labour and expense a-- :.:eir respective Circuni- 



Notes and Queries. ! • 369 

stances would admit, yet they are so very unfortunate as to find theia- 
selves involved in Difficulties thro' means of the undertaking-, and hare 
cause to apprehend that their good Intention:, may be entirely frustrated. 
Whi:i:i:fi/i:e the said Subscribers have thought it expedient to appoint 
John Roberts and Henry Funk, two of t!ie Surviving Trustees a Com- 
mittee to wait upon such Persons in the City of Philadelphia as they 
shall see meet' and to sollieit their Bounty on behalf of the said School, 
and they flatter themselves that from those with whom useful Learning 
hath its due Estimation, and especially from the Illustrious Sons of 
Science, their Design will he mo.-t generously Patronized: And they do 
hereby desire of the said Committee to present their sincere and grateful 
Thanks to any Person who may be pleased to grant a Favour to them 
upon this Petition. Dated at. Bristol afore.- aid this Eleventh Day of 
April Anno Domini 1771. 

John Roberts, 
James Diev.ohth, 
Matthew En-gram, 
Henmiy Fuxk, 
Thomas Roberts. 
Subscriptions. 
John Dickinson, 15/ paid. 
Nicholas Wain, 15/ paid. 
James Tilghman, 15/ paid. 
John Foxeroft, 15/ paid. 

My Dear Sir, 

I now beg leave to enclose the Petition ; I do not desire anything from 
the Governor, — he may please to subscribe what he thinks proper and as 
paid. The Poom left has been filled up contrary to our Intention and 
therefore must beg the Favour that the subscriptions may be on the 
hack' of tin.' Petition. 1 know too well how much he has been harrasscd 
with such Papers to a*k a real Gift from him — I know none but M r W m 
Logan likely to object & that a v.-ry narrow soul'd one because its open 
to every society : I am afraid he forgets his Bountiful .Gift to the Union 
School, Germantown, which was upon the same Plan and 1 am sorry I 
have it not in my Power now to inclose a Copy of the Establishment and 
of that which was [torn] to me. But this affair I leave altogether to D r 
Peters's Management. 

This day at the Anniversary Diet of the Philosophical Society — Smith 
took me aside concerning the :'•> — his Apology was no Less nor no more 
than what I expected. Integrity of Heart ir- a primary Virtue in my Es- 
teem. Poor Fellow I pitied him. I felt for him — if any Mail ever went 
thro' a Purgatory I am sure he did this Day. The Toasts in general were 
flimsy and foreign — some obscene it* p 'lite People aie supposed to under- 
stand double Kntendres. Put I will do him the Justice to say that he 
sometimes ahseonded from the most reprobate. 1 am extremely sorry 
ever to. see Divine Grace condescend t<» grace Licentiousness — the 
greatest Honor' of the Re past was the Presence of Doct r Graeme and the 
Modesty of M r Rittenhouse — these 'are my sentiments for the Present, 
when we have the Pfea?-urv of conversing 1 shall acquaint you more 
particularly : this in Confidence.' 

If I had not so good un opinion of D r Auchmuty I might have a 
better one of D r Smith, but ic 1- ditto repeated every day in my Ears ; 

VOL. XXIV. — 2 i 



370 Notes and Queries. 

I 

extorted Charity and I don't know what else I don't hear that I am 
sorry for. — It is not fur the Value of the Sum nor the Merit of the Gill 
that I want to be satisfied. 

I) r Smith p-ave an Intimation that the Governor would esteem it a 
Respect to sail from Fhilnd. in the White Oak Barge. Doctf T'nos. 
Bond, our Vice President gave his Promise, that he would use his 
Influence to obtain it — I make not the least Question that that Gent" 
w'ld perform it with the greatest Punctuality, provided he retained it in 
Mind : But least he should omit, I have this Evening anticipated hi* 
Application and I have the Promise of it suitably equipped both as to 
Rigging and Men for the Reception of his" Honour and his Company ^ 

when and where he pleases, of which I should be glad to have the 
earliest Intelligence from D r Peters provided it is his Inclination. I 
have so much Veneration for his Goverance & other valuable Qualifica- 
tions as well as those of M r Penn that 1 am perhaps too impertinently 
ready to gratify and honour him with every genteel Respect that is due 
to his Merit within the small Compass of my Abilities. 

I am 
D r Sir 

Yours most affty 

John Mukgatkoyd. 
Wednesday Evg. 

-» 

Warrant of Survey, "Plmmapecka Road/' Dublin Town- 
ship, Philadelphia County, 1701. — 

By the Proprietary and Governour of the province of Ptnntihania & 

Counties Ann. 

Whereas there- has been a Controversey for some time past depending 
between Joseph Ashton and Geo* Northrop on the one hand and the In- 
habitants in and about Dublin Township in ye County of Philadelphia 
on the other hand Concerning a Road laid out between Pemmapeeka 
Mill and Peters Leisters Brought before nice and ye Councill and severall 
times Debated but not yet Determined. These therfore are to Require 
you Thomas f;airman David Powell and Peter Taylor in order to a final! 
Determination of ye said Dilierencc to survey all the part* in Contro- 
versy of ye said Road and the other adjacent Road or Roads upon which 
"the said Controversy docs in some measure depend, and to view and duly 
Consider the Convenicncy of ye said Roads both w ,h Respect to the 
Plantations and Settlem ts of ye s J Joseph Ashton and Geo. Northrop and 
y* Gene rail Accomodation of y. e s' 1 Inhabitants, as also the Authority 
and Method by which they were at first laid out and make report thereof 
under your hands to mee in writing. Given under my hand and seal at 
Philadelphia y" 21 st day of the first month 1701, 

William Plnn. 
To Two' Fairman, David Powell 

and Peter Taylor. 

• 
Letters of Hon. Jasrer i eatks to William Hamilton, of the 
"Woodland-," advocating Lancaster for the location of the National 
capital. Copied from Letter Hook of Judge Ye.ites, in the Collection 
of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania: 



Notes and Queries. 371 

Lancastkb, March 10, 1TS9. 

Dear Sir, 

... Do you not think it worth while to make some arrangements so 
as to throw this Borough at least into the view of Congress, when they 
come to fix on a permanent place of residence'? A letter to some friends 
in that body expressive of your intentions in such a case would do no 
possible injury. I am far from being sanguine naturally, but I by no 
means conceive Lancaster mite out of the Chapter of Accidents. Con- 
gress will scarcely pitch on a sea-pert, or a city whose trade is consider- 
ably advanced. The jealousy of other States against a Metropolis 
founded on the peculiar advantages and benefits which must be desired 
from such a situation, in exclusion to their own favorite city, will have 
powerful effect. Add to this, they have scarcely forgot the treatment 
which they received in Philadelphia when insulted by the soldiery. I 
have barely suggested the matter fur your consideration ; it is worth a 
thought. Col. Hartley has promised to write me fully whenever any- 
thing of the kind occurs. But as to him, his interests and inclinations 
naturally lean to having the place of Congress fixed beyond the Susque- 
hanna. Next to York, I am thoroughly persuaded he would prefer this 
Borough. 

I am dear Sir with much Truth 

Your alTect. humble Serv 1 

Jaspxr Yeates. 



Lancaster. IS March ITso. 

Dear Sir, 

I wrote you eight days ago by D r Slough. Since that period the cor- 
poration of this Rorough called a meeting of some of the principal citi- 
zens and it was determined that letters should be wrote to our Senators 
and Representatives in Congress, stating our peculiar situation and in- 
viting them to fix their permanent residence amongst us. I was ap- 
pointed one of a Committee to draft such a letter, which I accordingly 
did, and send you a copy of it. If it answers no other purpose than, 
showing the state of the country and the improvements about us, the 
distance to a few remarkable places and the trades exercised by the in- 
habitants of the 1'orough immediately, it will still I llutter myself, atlbrd 
you some satisfaction. 

Two letters will be directed to our Senators and Representatives in 
Congress, each accompanied with a draft of the Ten Mih\< &/uare t laying 
down the coursesof the water mills, adjacent towns, roads &c, and . . . 
of the Susquehanna. This draft has been made by Mr. William Reich- 
enbaeh on actual mensuration, and is executed with much correctness. 
The letters will be forwarded by the next post, and 1 shall write to Mr. 
Hartly by the same conveyance. 

You will observe the liberty we have taken with your name. It will 
be proper therefore, in my idea, that you should write to some of TOUT 
friends in Congress, confirming the sentiments thrown out, in case you 
approve of them. If you can learn when the measure will be called up, 
1 should think (hat yean- personal attendance at New York might pro- 
duce happy etieets. You would have an opportunity of doing much on 
the spot while the subject is canvassing and the different manoeuvres. 



372 Notes and Queries,. . 

played by the several ponies. It is an object of the greatest magnitude 
to your own immediate interests. 

I am dear Sir, 

Your faithful & Afiect Serv* 

Jasper Yeates. 

LANCASTER, 22 March 17-.J. 

Dear Sik, 

... I beg you will wait on Messrs Clymer and Fit/Simmons. A let- 
ter from you to our friends in Congress and particularly to some if not 
all of our ^Representatives should express the same m niter fully and at 
large. In one word, my dour Sir, I would almost, if not quite, give 
them a Charte Blanche. 

Mr. John Hubley tell? me. that by a letter which Parson Muhlenberg 
has received from his brother Frederick, he is informed that Congress 
will in all probability settle at some place between Delaware and Sus- 
quehanna. This is very encouraging. F>o ask of Clymer and Fitzsim- 
nions to see our Map forwarded to them, and let me know your sentiments. 
I am dear Sir, 

Very affectionately yours 

Jasper Yeates:. 

Lancaster will most probably be the favored place says Mr. Fred'" 
Muhlenberg ! ! 

Letter of Margaretta Wayne to her Father, General An- 
thony AYayne. — ; 

Naaman's C— k June 10 th 

My Dear & Honor' d Papa 

In the first place let me congratulate you, & be thankful for your 
recovery after being so long confined with a bad state of health, which 
I hope is perfectly restor'd & that you enjoy every happiness this life 
can artbrd is the first wish of your affectionate daughter. 

I thank my Bear Papa for the good advice he gives me in every letter 
respecting my conduct in this life; I shall in every respect behave my- 
self in such a manner as to gain the good opinion of all my friends and 
acquaintances ; and hope at a latter day to resign myself without fear. 
1 hope my Dear Papa will not be displeas'd with me in being so long 
absent from Mrs. Kearney's. It was with friends advice. You write me 
Papa to speak my .sentiments therefore shall inform c you that every per- 
sone thinks M w K — board is very expensive, and 1 thought I wou'd 
have Papa's opinion it is a Gufnea a week. 

I have no ntw's worth writing only that Miss Hartly is to be Married 
.next week to D r Hall in partnership with D r Rush. 

Aunt Itouinson is in the Room & desires her host wishes to you. I 
have been down at Xaaman's C — k a few days — Mr. Delany is here at . 
present A: is so polite as take charge of my letter, 

. I have seen my Brother, lie is very harty & comes on fast in his learn- 
ing he is at present studying Greek. I think your letter Papa will en- 
courage him t<> learn, as he oiien wi.-h'd he cou'd receive a letter from 
you. I made free t<» open it. 

Before : conclusion 1 must once again shew Papa how greatly \ am in 
gratitude & in duty bound to thank him for his kind protection aud how 
devoid of understanding .-hou'd 1 be it' 1 was not to tbMmv his iidvicc 
and example & try to make myself worthy of his paternal Friendship, 



Notes and Qncru?. 373 

... It makes mc look back with sorrow, when I think what a great 
loss ft Father, is, for example Aunt Sally's Family what a loss as them 
poor Orphans meet with, to loose a Father just when. they had come to 
know the good of one. Papa we can't Prize health too much, it is a 
very valuable Blessing, & 1 hope you have a reasonable share of it. I 
have time to write a much longer letter but cannot with this pen, 1 shall 
in a few day's write you a much longer one. 

With every mark of respect I am my Dear Papa's Dutiful & affec- 
tionate Daughter 

Margarita Wayne. 

Letter of Judge Richard Peters to Jonathan Jones. — 

v REi.iroNT Feby. 12, 1S14. 

Dear Sir. 

At our last Meeting you were so good as to promise you would see 
Mr. Ilager & procure his Account of the Shad caught in Schuylkill after 
having been marked in a preceeding Season. The Fact is singular, & I 
had it well ascertained to me, that similar Facts had before happened. 
I wish to be fortified in my communication of it to the Philadelphia 
Society, by Testimony so respectable as that of Air. linger, who perhaps 
is reluctant at writing, tho' I only want a plain Narrative. I must beg 
of you to take an early opportunity of calling on him, & in a letter com- 
municate to me the Facts. I think 3-3 were marked & 25 caught — so I 
understood him to say. 

Relate all circumstances — how marked — when and at what time caught? 

Mr. Hughes was to inform about the 3 Jiuzliclxo'l Chimney Swallows 
which were smothered k, measured at a Mr. J. William's near the Gulph. 
Can you get the Facts on this subject? But one at a time you will 
think enough. Yrs. trulv, 

R. Peters. 

Quaker "Exiles in Virginia," 1777-177$. — Copied from the 
original documents in the "Jones Papers," in the Historical Society of 
Pennsylvania : 

Winchester Novm* I* 1777. 
Mr. David Franks, 

Sir. 

On sight hereof be pleased to pay to Mr. I>aac Wharton or order the 
sum of twelve pounds three shillings Stg. in live half Johannes & three 
English Guineas, the same being to repay the like nmuliCT o{' half 
Johannes and English Guineas now received here from Mr. Thomas 
"Wharton and others. Place this sum to account of pay due to us, hav- 
ing drawn two Pills of this tenor & date— the payment of the one voids 
the others. dkTkkry Lieutenant, 

To David Frank? E>t[ T Commissary Ft'iin&it, [Ensign.] 

of Prisoners or to any other in the regiment Knyphausen, 

Commissary or Pay master of the Hessian Service. 

Hessian Troops in the 

Service of Great Prittaiu. . 

• Winchester November 2C th . 1777 Received of Thomas Wharton 

Senior the sum of Eleven pounds fourteen shillings Virginia Currency 
(reckoning Dollars nt six shillings each) in full of my Demand against 



374 



Notes and Queries. 



Him for Vive Weeks & four rtays Board an<l Lodging at my House bo- 
pinning the 2£th of September last when he was brought with other 
Prisoners to my House l>y Daniel Lcvan of Perks County in Pennsylva- 
nia, the said Thomas Wharton having found (at his own expense exclu- 
sive of tin- above) the following articles to wit. Tea, Cofice, Chocolate, 
Sugar, Wine, Spirits, Peer, una Cyder. Witness my If and 

£11. 14. 0. Philip Pish. 

Kec d April IS, 1778, of Thomas Wharton Twenty four pounds twelve 
shillings ec 7d Virginia Currency, in Gold valuing a half Joe at 48 this 
Currency the same being in full for my Demand on him for his Board & 
keeping his Horse during Lis being at my House on his Banishment 
into Virginia. 

£24. VI. 7. Virg. Curr- V . ELIZABETH JOLLIFFE. 

Permit Thomas Wharton and Charles Eddy to pass from hence to 
Frederick Town in Maryland without Molestation we being authorized 
to conduct them & others to Lancaster in Pennsylvania. 

F. Bailey, 
J as Lang, Capt. 
Winchester, IS April 177S. ](p Pa Pee;*. 

Certificate or Allegiance and Fidelity of Jonathan 
Jones. — 



[DO hereby CERTIFY, That 

"Jonathan Jones was not of age when the 

Law -passed 
Hath voluntarily taken and fubferibed the affirma- 
tion of Allegiance and Fidelity, as directed by an Act 
of General Affembly of Pennsylvania* faffed the 
thirteenth Day of June, A. D. i///. 
JVitnefs my Hand and Seal, the Eighth Day of 
October A.D. 178$. 

fTs"! 

No. 192 L_j Isaac Howell. 



Letter or William Strickland to Jonathan Jones, 1>14. — 

Phi la Bee* «* Mil. 

Sir, 

The Topographical Corps of Engineers under the direction of Gen 1 
Jonathan Williams are requested to call upon the information vt Mr. 



Jfotes and Qverks. 375 

Jonathan Jones relative to the grounds suitable for military positions 
near the City. They will he at the Falls "of Schuylkill this afternoon at 
4 o'clock, when you will please to attend if possible. 
Jonathan Jones Esq. W. Strickland. 

Counsel-General John Hci.keii's Claim against General Ben- 
edict Arnold. — 

Mr. liolker has a bond of Gen 1 Arnold's for £8000 of January 1779 ; 
as this is the last day of Entering Claims, he would take it as a particu- 
lar favor if Mr. Nicholson would let him know if theie is any thing left 
of his Estate to answer -aid demand in whole or in part. 

Wednesday 5 th July 1786. 

Estimated Expenses. United States Mint, for first quarter of 
1795, under the Directorship of David Kit ten house. — 

An Estimate of the probable Expenses of the Mint of the United 
States for the present quarter commencing the first day of January 1705 

Dollars. 
For Salaries of the officers and clerks . . .' 2350.00 

For wages of Labourers including the pay of an assist- 
ant Engraver and a melter . . . . . 1500.00 
For Incidental and contingent Expences and re- 
pairs of the Mint vizt. 

Wages of Mechanics including millwright work . 750.00 
For Ironmongery, lead, wood, coals, stationery office 

furniture & other contingent expenses . . 1G50.00 

Amount of bills remaining unsatisfied from last quarter 1750.00 

4150.00 



Dollars SOOO.OO 
Mint of the United States 
12 January 1795. 
David Bitten house Director 
To Edmund Randolph Esq* 
Secretary of State 
of the United States 

Proclamation of Council or Safety, — 
To All Militia Officers and Others. 

By Intelligence just received, we find his Excellency General Wash- 
ington by a moster-streke of General-hip has uot between a considerable 
Body of the Enemy and New York, has attacked several pi>sts with suc- 
cess, made many prisoners and taken a great deal of Stores. His situa- 
tion appears Critical, unless immediately supported by the Pennsylvania 
Militia. Gen 1 Putnam has marched with a considerable number to 
Bristol and only waits fur a 'Good reinforcement, in order to enable him 
to attack the Enemy on this side. 

CONTRACTORS TO TIIK COUNCIL OF SAFETY, PENNSYLVANIA. — 

May SO, 1776. lVnvdenuakers. William Thompson, Thomas lleim- 
berjrer, Jacob Losh, and Henry liuber. 

June 1?, 2776'. 'Trover of Cannons," Dan it 1 Joy. 



376 Notes and Que 



Bexki.hct Arnold's Diiirrs.* 



rid 



Si^cie. 




£222. 12. 





4. 10. 





156. 0. 





15. 0. 





16408: 0. 





8204. 0. 






List of Debt.- claimed in the SHipreme Court of the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania to be due to the claimants from General Benedict Arnold 
at the time of his Attainder of Treason against the said Commonwealth. 



Thomas Cooper, Administrator of Jesse Jordan, decree for 

John Torrence, Claim not determined, tiled lor 

D r John Jones, do do 

Edward Shippen Esq., Decree for 

John llolker Es^. Claim filed 24 Apr 1 1781, of a Debt 
due on a Bond dated II th Day of Slay 
1779 for the penalty of 
conditioned for the payment of 
on the first day of September then next 
ensuing with lawful Interest for the same. 
Not yet determined. 

Claims to specific property made and filed in the paid Court against 
■ the said Benedict Arnold : 

Edward Shippen Esq.-, a few Articles of personal property which had 
been seized as the property of the said Benedict Arnold. Decreed. 

Edward Shippen, Joseph Shippen junior and Samuel Towel claim a 
Trust, in consideration of an intended Marriage between Margaret 
Shippen (Daughter of the said Edward Shippen) and the said Hen- 
edict Arnold in a certain Messuage and Tenement commonly called 
and known by the name of Mount Pleasant on the River Schuylkill 
in the Northern Liberties of the City of Philadelphia, with four 
Tracts of Land thereto belonging containing in the whole ninety 
nine Acres and ninety seven perches of Land or thereabouts with the 
Appurtenances in Trust to permit the said Benedict Arnold to enjoy 
and receive the Rents Issues and profits thereof during his natural 
life and after his death to convey the legal Estate in the said Mes- 
suages Lands <v.c. to the said Margaret Shippen the intended wife of 
the eaid Benedict Arnold or to such Trustees as she should appoint, 
to the following uses to the use of the said Margaret for and during 
the Term of her natural life without Impeachment of Waste and 
after the death of the said Margaret to the use and behoof as well 
of such child or children of the said Margaret as should by the said 
Benedict Arnold on the body of the said Margaret be begotten as 
of the three sons of the said Benedict Arnold by hi* former wife 
and to the use of the Heirs and Assigns of every sueh child or 
children and of the said three sons forever to he divided in equal 
proportions &c in severalty as Tenants in common &c and not as 
Joint m en t j?, praying the Court to confirm and save the Right of the 
Claimants in the premises so as to enable them to perform the Trust 
reposed in them so far as regards the Rights and Estates of the said 
Margaret Arnold and the child or children of the said Margaret 
born or to be born and of the three sons of the said Bcuedict Arnold 
by his former wife. 

Decreed agreeably to the prayer of the Claim. 
The claims and decree.- against the forfeited estate of Benedict Arnold 

certified by Edward Kurd, Prothonotary, December 1, 17Mi. 



Notes and Queries. 377 

Muster Roll of Captaix Jekemiah Taluot's Company, of 
Colonel Wilj.hm -Ikvinh's Sixth Pennsylvania jIattalion", 1776. 
- — The original of the following Muster Roil is in the Collection of the 
Vermont Historical Society, and we print it from a certified copy oi'T. 
C. Phinney, Esq., Deputy Secretary of State, Vt., and contributed by 
Luther R. Xelker, Esq., as an additional muster to that given in Penn- 
sylvania Archives, Second Series (Second Edition), Vol. x. p. 184. 

A Muster Roll of Captain Jeremiah Talbot's Company, in Col. Irvin's 
Battalion of Forces in the feftate of L\nn>ylvauia, and ho.* in the service 
of the United States of America commencing Oct. 1, 177G. Dated in 
Camp on Mount Independence November 28 1770. 

When Commissioned 

Appointed. Otlicers. Casualties. 

177f,. 

January 9, Jeremiah Talbot, Capt. On Furlow Pennsylvania by 

G. Gates, Nov. 17th. 
" 9 John McDonnald, 1st Lieut. 
" 9 Alex* r Brown, 2nd. Lieut. 
" 9 William Graham, Ens'r 
Sergeants. 

Oct. 1, John M. Cullam, Sick in G. Hospital. 

1, John Wilson, 
1, Ja's Cuppels, 

1, Samuel Mitchell, Sick in Camp. 

Corporals. 
Oct. 1, William Campbell, 

1, Robert Hunter, 

1, John Chain, . Sick in Camp. 

1, John Peniston, Sick in G. Hospital. 

Drummer. 
Oct. 1, John Melton. 

Fifer. 
Oct. 1, John Kalian. Sick in Camp. 

Privates. 
Oct. 1. Asten, Robert 
Bradley, John 

Black,* \Villiam Sick in G. Hospital. 

Church, John 
Coghren, George 
Clark, Francis 
Carnalian, PoLcit 
Conner, Charles 
Campbell, John 
Chambers, Joseph 

Dinning, John Sick in G. Hospital. 

Dinning, Jan'r 
Evens, William 
Faulkner, John 

Faire<s, Hugh Sick in G. Hospital. 

Gardner, James 
Gibson, David Sick in Mt. Indp't Hospital 



378 



Nofcs arid Qi 



(tries. 



HeasUt, WiUiain 

Heuthcnagton, J oh 
Handion, Duke 
Higgins, John 
Keilev. Kern 



Lyon, Stephen 
Levi?, Jacob 
LiUey, Hugh 
McFarien, James 
MarteD, J elm 
Mellen, Robert. 
Morrison, Benjamin 
McCown, Jus. 
MeHonuahi. Arcbib 
Mitchel, Thomas 
Murry, Charles 
Murry, Patrick 
McConnel, Mathc'a 
McCreerg, Thomas 
McCrady, Larana 
Morgan, Abel 
McMillan, Charles 
Nickel, Archibald 
Piukerton, Andrew 

Power, Samuel 
Pollock., John 

Quarre, J as. 
Shaw, William 
Swalo, Mick 
Shoomaker, John 

Sloan, James 
Tatton, John 
Thompson, John 
Thompson, Hugh 
White, William 



Sick in Mt. Independ't Hos- 
pital. 
Sick in G. Hospital. 

Sick in G. Hospital. 
Sick in G. Hospital. 
Sick In G. Hospital. 
Sick in Camp. 



ild Sick in G. Hospital. 

Sick in Camp. 
Sick in Camp. 



Sick in Camp. 
Sick in Camp. 
Sick in G. Hospital. 
Sick in Mt. Independent Hos- 
pital. 

Sick in Mt. Independent Hos- 
pital. 
Sick in Camp. 

On furlough with Capt 'n. 
Sick in Mt. Independ't Hos- 
pital. 
Sick in Camp. 
Sick in G. Hospital 



Sick in Mt. Independ't Hos- 
pital 
Sick in G. 



Hospital. 



Sick in Camp. 



White, John 
Welch, John 
Watson, Robert 
Wiley, Isaac 

Mustered then in Captain Jeremiah Talbot's company, in Colonel 
Irvine's Battalion of the force- of the United States of America, raised in 
the State of" Pennsylvania, the first & second Lieutenants & Ensign, two 
SerjenU, two Corporals one Drum & thirty one Privates. 

Allowing the Captain, two Serjents, two Corporals & one Fife, to pass 
unrespited, they being Certified Infectives on the hack of the roll. 

Rich'd Varick, lVp'y M. M. Genl. 

This Mn-ter is taken from the 9tb of Jany. for the Officers A from 
the 1st of October, 177>'> for the non Commissioned Officers £ Privates to 
the 28th of Nov. 177G. 



Notes caul Queries. 379 ■ 

[0/< the bar J: nftht Roll.] 
"Whereas Captain Jeremiah Tabot is absent & hath not furnished me 
with the Papers of his Company in Col. Jrvin's Pattallion .so that It is 
Impossible for me to Account for the Date of the Enlistment of the non 
Commissioned Otnccrn & Private- ; I do hereby ccrtifye on Honor that 
the Oilicers non Commissioned oliiccrs ami Privates who appeared this 
]Jay under Arms in the said Company in Col. Jrvin's Battalliun are Bona 
Fide Engaged in service of the United Slates of America before the d.iys 
set opposite to their respective names &. that they receive pay According to 
the Paul; they hold in the roll. J do also Certifyethat the absentees are 
to the Pest of my Knowledge. Effectives and absent for the reasons set 
opposite to their respective names. 

John McDonnald, Lieut. 

Letter of Captain Thomas Hazel wood, of the Pennsyl- 
vania Navy, to Joseph Read, Esq. — 
Sir. 

As the season of the Year is advancing that the part of the Fleet 
Bow in Commission can be of n-j further service during the Winter 
Months, I would wish to obtain of your Excellency a Furlow to make 
a Voyage to the West Indies, as the Pay is by no means sufficient to 
support an Officer in the City, tho' 1 would give "the preference to serving 
my Country. Put if your Excellency thinks my further Service will not 
be wanted in the Spring, would choc.se to resign my Commission now. 

Your Exeellencys complying with either will be thankfully acknowl- 
edged by 

Your Exeellencys most Obedient ec Ilunib 1 Serv* 

Thomas Hazelwood. 

Phi lad a. Deceinb. 11 th , 177$. 

Letter of Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Hartley, of the 



Sixth Pennsylvania Pattalion, 177G. — 

Camp— Ticondap.oga, Defy* 23^ 1776. 

D»Sirs, 

When you left us T told you I would write to you in a few Days, if 
I remained among the Number of the Living. 

Since you left us, wo have had all Hands at work — Redoubt upon Re- 
doubt raising — strengthening the old works — mounting guns — making a 
Boom anl. Pridge across the Lake — and making every other Disposition 
necessary *) receive the Enemy, The wind has been very unfavourable 
to them lor" this week. Several Bodies of Militia are coining this way — 
some will be in this Evening. We shall then be able to spare .... 
men to attack the. Enemies advanced Pattys at Putnam's Creek. The 
great number of Sick among us you know leaves barely a sufficiency to 
man the Lines. At any Pate should the Enemy not attack us tomorrow, 
wc shall 1 am pretty confident attack their Party's tomorrow Xight or 
the next Morning, li' the wind continues South wc can do it safely. 
Officers and Men are in high Spirits, and make no doubt but they will 
give the Knetny a flogging. 

The Proceedings of Congress of the S ;h of October have been received 
by the General i some Men will eiilist again, but many have an Inclina- 
tion to see their Homes before they Ehirairc. 

In Justice to some Gentlemen of Merit in this Pattalion 1 bee leave 



380 Notes and Queries, 

to recommend them for Advancement, in some of the new Battalion? (or 
Others should there by Preferments be any vacancies in it) 

Majors Dunlap and Grier to Lieut'- Colonels. 

Captains Hay ami \WA\ to Majors. 

Lieut 5 McDonald, Mr. Hops, Lieut" Alexander, Edie and M e Allister 
to be Captains, Lieut. Montgomery a 2' 1 to be a fust Lieut, also Ensign 
Miller to the like. Mr. Walker, Mr. Beajy & Mr. Parker for Ensigns. 
Mr. .McDowell, Mate, to be a Surgeon. Doctor Johnston, would will- 
ingly exchange his present Employment for a Majority ; should he be 
appointed a Major the publick will find him qualified for that otiiee. 

Perhaps you may think my Demand?, rather unreasonable, but as you 
are now modling an Army, upon which the Liberties of America so 
much depends and in which I consider myself interested, I use the 
Freedom. 1 know the Gentlemen recommended to be Persons of good 
Understanding and men of Honour. They have improved as much as 
possibly would be expected from their Experience. 

From the great number of Officers which this Pegiment lost in Canada, 
this Battalion was allowed to keep the two Majors which had been ap- 
pointed ; iu the new Establishment it can only have one, so that we have 
a Field Ollicer too many. 

A resignation or an Advancement must take place. I cheerfully en- 
gaged in the Service with a real desire of serving my Country a Year, in 
the best Manner my Abilities would admit ; how far I have executed my 
OfHee with Propriety my Country will determine. If J merit a Kegi- 
ment I make no doubt, but it will be granted me. Should another have 
superior Merit it will be given him. I shall not repine at the latter, 
because 1 shall suppose that my Country will be the better served aud 1 
shall be justifiable in retiring from the Army, till the Demands of my 
Country shall make it necessary to join it again. I wish Wisdom to 
.your Councils, and a happy and free Constitution to the Province of 
Pennsylvania. You may lay these Pecomnmndations before your Con- 
vention or Council of Safety. 

I am Gentlemen 
with great Regard 

your most obed 1 
humble Serv* 
Colonels Potter and Clark m Tiio 8 Hartley. 

& John Morris Esq* 

High Constable Carlisle, of Philadelphia, was an important 
functionary during the administration of President Washington. He 

\v;is a remarkable character, of gigantic form, aud as well the peace- 
maker and terror of all rowdies. His dress was a black velvet coat, flap 
waistcoat, small clothes, shoes with old-fashioned buckles, and a cocked 
hat. He carried a large black stick, with the arms of Pennsylvania on 
a silver head, and wheu on the street was generally followed by a large 
Newfoundland dog. 

P. P. C. 

"A List of those peksoxs that refuse to go to Camp, 'tut, 
they ark Com pell En, 1 ' is addressed to Colonel Timothy Matlack, 
1770. 

"Hakes Emerick, Baker, in Market street the comer of Seventh street. 



Notes and Queries* 381 

"John Heyl, in fourth Street, near Market Street. 

"George Michael J leek, Cuopfcr, the Corner of Applctrec alley in 
fourth street. 

"John Bach, gunsmith, in second street above Vine street. 

"Daniel Frishmuth, in fifth street ophite the 14 Chemneys, 

"John Schneider, in New ptfeet between Second and third street. 

"John Quantle, in Vine street between fourth and fifth street. 

"Peter Draiss, in third street near Church Ally. 

"Xiclas.s Hartsback, in Water street near Walnut street, Ceder 
Cooper*" 

Letter of Charles »Vill:>o>' Peale to Joseph Reed. — 

Sir, 

The Bearer — Macklemarra, lo.^t .his Ami in the Engagement of the 
■white plains, lie belongs to Capt' 1 ilamsay's Company of Smallwood's 
Batt n of Maryland Trdops, and has been in Town several Days and can- 
not get a Surgeon to dress his Arm, lie has applyed to several who says 
they were not appointed for that purpose besides he dbnt know where to 
get his liasious — he has a man to attend him of the same Company. 
pray give them amediate assistance to oblige. 

Cha* W. Peai.e 

they have no place to put their Heads in. I am just going, adieu. 

Beavers i>~ Upper NQfcEHAiEPTON County, 1750. — The John 
Okely mentioned in the following letter of Samuel Wallis to the firm 
of James & Drinker, of the City of Philadelphia, was for many years 
the scrivener and land agent for the Moravian estates in Pennsylvania. 
Kobert Levers was a resident of Laston : 

P.ETHLEUEM, .\ p. 5. I7.y>. 

Pursuant to your instructions I have proceeded over the Blue Hills in 
company with your friend John Okely, who has agreeable to your re- 
quest aecompauyed me with the greatest chcert'ullness and whose opinion 
on the sundry Tracts which we have been able to sec I expect accom- 
pany^' this Letter. On our advising with Rob 1 Levers & sundry other 
persons who were well acquainted with the ^hawhollock Land-, we find 
that the obtaining a perfect knowledge of that Tract at this season is 
impracticable by reason of the -waters beittg high and no conveniency 
in crossing them., as well as that (at hast) one third of the land (the 
most valuable part thereof) is covered with water by the Beaver Dams, 
which can't be expected (they sav) to be clear untill about the middle of 
May. 

Royal Barracks, Philadelphia. — Joseph Pox, Barracks Master, 
was paid the following sums for the quartering of troops, etc., during 
the year 17l>9 : 

Aug. 8 Quartering the Troops, ..... £300.0.0 

vSept. 14 do. do. . . . . 119.S.0 
Oct. '20 Aect. building house for Colonel on West side o( 

Barracks -.. ; 500.0.0 

Nov. 11 Quartering the Troops 100. 0.0 

Dec 5 do. do/ 100.0.0 



382 



Notes and Queries. 



o 



H 



CD 



O 



<3 
O 



C3 

a; 

CO 

■a 
o 



S3 

PQ 



co « 

I 



o 



3 






co 1 



cq 



co *" 



cJ 



£ 






Oi 



<5> 



tv. 



CO 



XT 



ex, 

< 

J3 



<1 






a 

6 

o 
PQ 



Letter of President Joseph Reed to Captain Thomas Clug- 
gagk, of Bedford County. — 

PHILADELPHIA, June 25* 177*. 

Sir, 

Yoih- letter of the eleventh instant has been ducly received, and Mr. 
Donnelly is appointed your Second Lieutenant agrveably t<> your desire. 
When M r Piper and yourself have fixed upon your first Lieutenant and 



Notes and Queries. 333 

made him known to us we slmll readilly appoint him. We were appre- 
hensive tli.it the encouragement jrimi to the boat service, and other 
inferior branches of the Susquehanna expedition would injure the 
recruiting, but as it eventually promotes the same object, viz 1 the safety 
of the frontier? we can submit to it with more c hear fullness. 

We hope that you will he able to recruit near your compliment, tho 
you may not fully reach it. It would have been very agreeable to us 
to have been informed of the exact state of the company and we request 
you will do it as soon as possible. 

Mr. Carson at Carlisle has undertook the supply of the articles prom- 
ised in the recruiting instructions, and has actually supplied Captain 
Irwin's company. We have forwarded some money to him for this pur- 
pose and shall supply him with more when necessary, we would there- 
fore have you apply to him. 

The favourable reports received on all hands from the westward of the 
disposition of the savages since the capture of Governor Hamilton gives 
us hopes that you may be able to co-operate with General Sullivan, who 
is very anxious; to have a body of good woodsmen. There will not only 
be an opportunity of acquiring more [torn] there, than remaining 
merely defensive ;■ but in such case it would be in our power, to send you 
supplies from the City which the scattered state of the troops and diffi- 
culty of carriage now in a great measure prevents. We shall forward a 
supply of money by the first safe opportunity, and if any one is coming 
down you will do well to direel him to wait on us for this purpose. 

I am Sir 

Your obedient and very humble 

Servant, 

Jos. Reed, 
President, 

To Captain Thomas Cluggage, 
of Bedford County. 



Lady Washington* Entertained in Philadelphia, May, 17S9. — 
On Thursday, May 21, 17^0, an express reached Philadelphia with the 
intelligence that Lady Washington, en route from Mount Vernon to join 
the President in New York, would breakfast the next morning at 
Chester. Early on Friday morning the two troops of Light Horse com- 
manded by Captains Miles and Bingham, the Governor of the State, the 
Speaker of the Assembly, and a number of gentlemen mounted, pro- 
ceeded to a point ten miles from the city t<> await her comimr. Near 
Darby, Mrs. Robert Morris with a distinguished company of ladies, iu 
carriages, joined the escort, and when Gray's Gardens were- readied, an 
elegant cold luncheon was served. From the bill of expenses, presented 
by Simon Gratz, Esq., to the Historical Soeiet) of lYun>ylvania. weol tian 
a partial list of those who were present : Governor Thomas Mifilin, 
Richard Peters, Temple Franklin, Henry Hill, Clement Diddle. J6hn 
Mitllin, benjamin Chew, Jr., Robert M«»rris, Jr., William Morris, 
Richard Radio, John Ross, Robert Hare, Geonre Harrison. Samuel 
Meredith, Captain Miles and thirty-nine "gentleman troopers," four 
Continental officers, and Lady Washington and twenty ladies. The 
seventy-nine participants consumed 1<> liottles of Madeira . Wine, 1 
bottle Champagne, - buttles Claret, 4.'. bowls i'unch, 10 tattles Ameri- 
can Porter, 1 bottle Taunton Ale, and '1 bottles Crab Cider. After the 



384 Notes and Queries, 

luncheon the company proceeded to the residence of Mn. Morris, who.-e 
guest Lady Washington tea* to he t amid the xpplause of the citizens, 
the ringing of bells, and a salute of thirteen puns from the artillery 
commanded by Captain Fisher. On Monday mondmr Lady Wash- 
ington in company with Mrs. Morris set out for New York, in the midst 
of a rain and with an escort of light horse, and en Wednesday was met 
by the President and several gentlemen at EHzubethtown Point, and 
conducted over the bay in the President's barge to Peek's Slip, where 
she was welcomed by crowds of citizens. 

Two Letters of General Washington to the Council of 
Safety of Pennsylvania, J 776.— 

Head Quart; SR3 Ti-.e.vton Falls 
10* December 177G 
Sir, 

Yours of last evening reached me at 4 o'clock this morning. I im- 
mediately sent Orders to Commodore Seymour to despatch one of his 
Gallics down to Dunk's Ferry, and I shall dispose of the Remainder in 
such manner, and ot such place* as will be most likely, not only to annoy 
the Enemy in their Passage, but to give the earliest Information of any 
attempt of that kind. 

Parties of the Enemy have been reeonnoitering both up and down 
River, and I imagine that it has been one of those parties that have ap- 
peared near Burlington, for as they have not found the least opposition 
from the People of Jersey, they venture very far from their main Body, 
which for the best Information still. lays about Trenton and above it. 

I have desired Col" Hampton, who is the bearer of this, to apply for 
a party of men, to go up Cooper's and Ancocus Creeks, and bring down 
all the Craft he may find there, for it is in vain to cut down Bridges, if 
the Boats are left. They cannot be trusted to the care of the owners, 
for if an Enemy was to appear, such is their Fear, that they would 
deliver them up upon the first demand. 

I think that the Fort began at Billing-sport should be attended to, if 
there is not a party already there, one should be sent under a good Offi- 
cer, who would not too readily take the Alarm and come oil', for you may 
depend that only small Bodies will be sent to that Distance. But 1 have 
always found that the intelligence brought by people not used to see 
Men in Arms, has always magnified numbers exceedingly, and on this 
Head the OUicer should be guarded, not to trust to Report, but be well 
satisfied himself, before he gives up his Post. 

Having sent down Major General Putnam to throw up necessary 
Works for the Defence of your City, 1 hope you will co-operate with 
him, and give him every Assistance in your power to expedite so acces- 
sary an Operation. 

I have the Honour to be Sir 

Your most ob' Serf 

G° Washington 
To Hon pi 4 Thomas Wk.vi:ton jun r Esq* 
President of the Council of Safety 
, Philadelphia. 

Hk.vd QCAM v M Hi cks COUNTY, 
IT* Decern* 1776. 

Get*. 

Since I wrote you yesterday, I have received Information that the 
Enemy are still moving downwards, and by their making Facines, they 



Notes and Queries* 385 

either have not yet laid aside their Designs upon Philadelphia, or tliey 
mean to Quarter in the small Towns along the Kiver, in which ca.se I 
suppose they would throw up small Works to prevent a surprize. In 
either ca.se, if there are any Artillery or Stores at P>jl lings port, they 
should be immediately removed, a< I find, from a late Letter from you, 
that you have not a sufficient Force to protect the Works that have been 
erected. I am Gentlemen 

with the greatest Respect 

Y r mo>t ob' Isterv* 
G° "Washington. 
Hon blc Council of Safety of 

Pennsylvania. 

]>EATH AND BUKTAL OF OWEN J02?F.S, PROVINCIAL TREASURER OF 

Pennsylvania. — Through the kindness of Mrs. George P>. Roberts and 
Miss Elizabeth 0. Roberts, I have had in my possession for some days 
several old manuscript books found in the home of the late Colonel Owen 
Jones at Wynnewood. Susanna, one of the daughters of the Provincial 
Treasurer, married John Xancarrow. In one of these old books she 
gives the following account of the death and burial of her father, which 
occurred during the prevalence of the yellow fever in 1793: 

"In the beginning of August 1703 it pleased the wise Disposer of 
human events, to visit Philadelphia with a disease, which in many of 
its symptoms so nearly resembled the Plague, th-at the Physicians were 
at a loss for a name, less alarming, to the afliicted citizens when they 
were called upon to denominate a disorder, which made so awful a prog- 
ress in our city, it was a time of deep trial, and caused great searching 
of heart, none knowing what instant the contagion would reach them.. 
Our friends and neighbours were hourly carried to their silent habita- 
tions, and dismay so seized the. people that there were but very few, who 
had sufficient resolution to attend their nearest relations, either during 
their illness, or to their graves. Persons of the first distinction were 
without attendance except a black' man who led the hearse, there were 
none to see that they were dec* ntly committed to the earth, and those 
who possessed the means to procure every comfort, suffered for want of 
a glass of water. There was a «erious desertion of parents from chil- 
dren, children from parents, husbands from wives, and wives from 
husbands, thousands fled into the country for safety. 

"My father and mother with several of their children, staid in. the 
city, and were favoured to escape the disorder, except my father, who 
was attacked- with the prevailing malady on the 3rd of October, and ou 
the Oth resigned his pure spirit into the hands of his maker. Sly 
mother and brothers with my sisters, Ann. Martha, Rebecca, and myself 
were present at this awful seen. He seemed to have nothing to do but 
to die, was sensible to the last, and altho speechless, he frequently until 
the last half hour, cast his eyes Upon eacb one of us, tlu-n mildly fixed 
them upon mother, and with her hand clasped in his (which he had held 
the last three hours) finished bis valuable life. We did nut commit his 
remains to the hands of strangers but performed every necessary duty for 
our father without eveu the presence of a servant (vet they did not, as 
.many did, desert us. but mo. t arleetion.Uely performed all that was re- 
quired of them).* An attempt to describe our dear mother's fortitude is 
altogether vain, she was helped with strength not her own, ami per- 

vol. xxiv. — 25 






38G J\ T olc.s and Qtteries. 



1769. 


Aug. 


8. 




Nov. 


1. 
22 




Dec. 


5 


1770. 


Feb. 


3 


1772. 


March 


21 

21 


1773 


Feb. 


5 


1771 


Sep. 


26 



£200. 


0.0 


100. 


0.0 


COO. 


0.0 


400. 


0.0 


130. 


0.0 


90. 


2.3* 


20.15.0 


15. 


0.0 


7. 


6.0 


1. 


5.0 


20.15.0 




12.6 






I 

formed wonders* When Iter earthly treasure was placed in his coffin, 
she put lib winding; sheet about him, smd when all things were ready 
accompanied his remains to its silent mansion. A few of the neigh- 
bours attended the funeral to the irate of the burial ground. On the 
way from the corner of Market along Fourth, many of the inhabitants, 
who were afraid to venture out, stood at their windows, in which they 
placed candles, (it was night) with a friendly view, not only to throw 
light on the pavement but to pay the last mark of attention to one who 
so deservedly commanded their esteem." 

Howard Williams Li oyd. 

I 
Order of Brigadier-General William Maxwell to Major 
Abraham Labar, 1776. — 

Eastox 10* Decern. 1776 

Sir, 

You are hereby requested to furnish eight soldiers to be commanded 
Alternately by two Serg ts of the Continental Troops cc the whole to be 
under your Direction, to guard the Ferry and Water-craft at Easton till 
further Orders, for which they shall he allowed the usual pay cc Provi- 
sions of the Continental Troops. Given under my hand 

\V* Maxwell 

Brig* Gen 1 
To Major Abr m Labar. 

State House Items. — From the accounts of Owen Jones, Treasurer 
of the Province of Pennsylvania, the following items relating to the 
State House are extracted : 

Repairs, ..... 

do. & building Wall, 
do. do. . 

do 

do 

Pumps & Fire Buckets, 
E. JHiflield care of clock, 
Painting Fire Buckets, . 
Glazing Windows 
Mending do. 
1775 Sept. 27 E Dufliekl care of clock, . . 

Repairing Pump. .... 

Letter of Joseph Suipeex, Jr., to Edward Shipped. — 

Philadelphia IS* November 1775. 
(Saturday evening.) 

Dear & noxoriu;D Sin, 

I have the pleasure to acquaint you with my brother's <x. my safe re- 
turn home on Tuesday evening to our Families, whom we found per- 
fectly well. On the n<ad within ■miles of Town we were met by Capt. 
Housecker who very* agreeably surpri-ed us with the great News of t lie 
taking of St. Johns ec the repulse of General Carle ton, tike particular 
Acct* of which with the Articles of Capitulation ymi will see in the 
papers. We are daily in expectation of receiving News of the further 
success of the Continental Forces at Montreal *v. Quebec I would lain 
hope these fortunate enterpriz.es will tend rather to induce the Mini-try 
to bring about an Accommodation, than to irritate the Mother Country 



Note* and Queries. . 387 

& provoke its further Valence against us. But if the latter should 
unhappily prove to be tilt* Case, our having possesion of Canada, with 
the Canadians and Indians in our Interest will he of immense advantage 
to us, as thereby the Ministry will be deprived of the great addition of 
strength they expected to derive iVwru thai Country, and the Forces 
from Great Britain must necessarily be much divided in their operations 
next year. . . Letters from New York by the Post eay that 2~> Trans- 
ports are just arrived at Ronton with Troops, but the number of their* 
is not known. It was a lake Humor that a. Ship of War was in our 
River, or at our Capes, and we have no reason to expect any will come 
here this Winter, so that I think we need not be under any uneasiness 
or apprehension about cur Safety here, at least before next Spring. But 
I hope a Cessation of Hostilities will take place in the course of the 
"Winter . . . Cousin Peggy Willing v.a.- married last Thursday night to 
Mr. Hare, and there was a very inert y Wedding, at which nay neice 
Miss Betsy Shippen was one of the Brides Maids. 

Jenny & my children join me in Love to Mammy & yourself, and we 
desire also to be affectionate!) remembered to Mr. & Mrs Yeates & 
family, & to Miss Patty Gray. 

I am Dear Sir 
Your very affectionate 
& dutiful Son 

Joseph Shipp.cn Jr 



Letter of General Anthony Wayne to President Thomas 
Wharton, Jr., of Pennsylvania, 1778. — 

Mount Jov April I0 ;t> 177?. 

Dear Sir, 

Agreeable to your desire, I have ordered up an additional number of 
Recruiting officers, who are all well recommended for their Industry 
and Sobriety, and who I wish were tolerated to enlist in any Quarter 
where it is most, possible they may meet with success, as confining them 
to particular Counties will rather retard than expedite or facilitate the 
Recruiting Service. I communicated your Idea to his Excellency of 
constantly employing some Oiiicers in that Business, in order to keep the 
Regiments & Corps complete; which meet his warmest approbation ; and 
he requests through me that your Excellency would .adopt so salutary a 
Measure as its of the first Consequence, to have Veterans in phu-e of 
raw raised troops,, which will always be the ease if the Recruiting busi- 
ness is put oil' till the Spring of the year ; and then the Time is so short ihot 
we can't hope either to complete or Maiueuvre our Corps before they take 
the field. J wish your Excellency to order the Recruits to be clothed & 
appointed before they leave Lancaster JH they can't be supplied In re. the 
Sixteen additional Regiments and the Carolina troops being ordered to 
be supplied previous to any others, so that we have little prospect of 
receiving any benefit from the Clothier Generals Store in this Quarter; 
and ah ho' tolerable with regard t<> ehoesStockingsvS; Hats, we are wretch- 
edly provided in other RcspecK particularly as u> Shirts. J do assure 
your Excellency that there are near one third of my men that have no kind 
of Shirt under 1 leaven, and scan ely a man in the Division, with mere 
than one, nor have 1 been able to draw any during this whole winter. 
For Gods sake endeavour to d<» something for u>, the Season is near 
arrived that required every atteutiou to keep the Troops healthy, and 



388 Notes and Q'./crirs. 

nothing will be more Condusive to it than clean linnen — in this mrticU 
we are in a wor.se Condition than any troops on the ground, nay worse 
than JTalstatPs lteeruits ; they had a shirt and a half to a Company. 
You'll pardon me for dwelling so long on this subject, but upon ray Soul, 

I cannot help it — my feelings as a man, are so much hurt by the Com- 
plainings and misery of the poor Fellows, uho hare no shirts at dl, that 
I can have no peace of mind until they arc provided. 

A Quantity ot superfine Cloth and about 12 or 1500 yards of Linnen 
were purchased by Col. Miller and k-ft in the hands of Mr. Jacob Eieh- 
elberger at York, for the use of our Troops ; will you he kind enough to 
order Mr. Howell to send for it least other Troops should receive the 
Benefit of that which we are in so much want of. A Woman who has- 
been in Philada. for three or four days, and tins moment returned says, 
that the general .Report there is that in the Course of two weeks the 
Enemy intend to take the Field, but at the Quarters of some principal 
Officers, they have been frequently overheard talking in a Desponding 
style, and that they can't move until they receive lieinforeements, with 
severe sarcasm against their General, who they wish, to be mated, and 
who J hope will not until we have an opportunity to Burgoyne him. 
But this will depend upon the exertions of the States — at present he out- 
numbers us — and by the best accounts New England is so absorbed in 
accumulating Wealth that they have become totally Insensible to our 
sufferings and Danger, and sunk into a torpid Supineness, from whieh 
its difficult to arouse them. 

I am your Excellency's most Obd't 
and very Humb" Servant 
By order of General Wayne 

Bex. Fisiilouex A. D. C. 

James Mitchell, of Donegal Township, Lancaster County, 
writing to James Logan under date of May 13, 1723, states: 

"I give you to know that there is fifteen familcys of Dutch conic from 
Alboney & are now settling upp Swattarra. I send an account of it to 
the Governour & Councile by Conay Thorn & an address from the upper 
Savages to the Governou*- and Couneile & I have heard they are Impa- 
tient for the answer & for me to send an Express on such ocasions att my 
own charge will not answer. 

"Ja. l'atterson is not yeet come out of the woods but is expected 
every day — his wife is likely to Dy." 

Wanted: a Hector for C i teste rtown, Maryland. — 

June S-» 1789 

D'S', 

As you have once more embarked in public Business, for the good of 
your Fellow Citizens, in their temporal Concerns, I take it for granted 
you will excuse, the Trouble I am about to give you. in a matter of far 
greater Importance. We ait? in immediate want of a Parson. I could 
describe the kind of Man who would suit us in iVw Words; as for 
Instance, he niu*t be unlike some we have bad, in every thing but abil- 
ities. He must be a good Preacher, a sound Divine and if a zealous 
High Church Man, so much the better. We want one, who will not only 
preach, but live down, the Methodist*. Due who will think it his Duly, 
to lead the Asses to water, you know what I allude to, and not one who 



Notes and Queries. 3S9 

thinks of the Stipend only. In short, we want a Man who has a great 
deal of the Church in his heart ami a good deal of the Gentleman in his 

Behaviour. A Person whose name is Behn, has been strongly recom- 
mended to us, and I wish you to make some inquiries about him of Doc- 
tor White. If the Doctor hesitates, T shall govern myself accordingly, 
without bringing him into View, in the least. If he can venture to write 
in his Favour, an application will be made directly. The Living, 
including Perquisites, will I apprehend not, fall much, if any, short of 
$■'300 per Ann. Be pleased to let me have an answer soon, as I suspect 
another Person, who is by no means the Thing, is thought of by some 
People. 

I wish poor Betsey's A flair was well over, that we might know when 
to expect the pleasure of your Company. 

Yours AfT? 

Sam. Chew. 
To Benjamin Chew Esq r 
Philadelphia. 

Franklin. — 

TO Bx. FeAXKLIX Esqr. 

Sir, 

. The Associate* of Dr. Bray, for establishing Parochial Libraries, and 
instructing the Negroes in the British Plantations, meet on Thursday the 
7 day of April at Ten o'Clock, at their Oilico at the Angel and Bible, in 
Ave- Mart/ Lane. 
Associates Office, 
1768. 

Items of American Interest in the New Tendon Magazine, Vol. 
I.j.July to December 17S5. — 

Obituaries. 

July., — William Strahan Esq. his Majesty's printer, who was mem- 
ber in the last two parliaments, first for Malmsbury, and after for Woot- 
ten Bassets, both in Wiltshire. 

In Cork St., Burlington-gardens [London], Thomas Foxcroft Esq. 
last postmaster-general [sic] of Philadelphia. 

At Cranham Hall, Essex, General James Oglethorpe, aged 102 years. 
He was the oldest general in England. 

August. In New Street [London}, in her C7th year Mrs. Strahan, 
widow of the bite William Strahan. 

September. At Septishury, in Dorsetshire, Miss Ann Jekyell, second 
daughter of the late Lev. Dr. Jekyll, Dean of" St. David's. 

At his brother's house, in Southampton-Bow [London] David 
Thompson, M.D., of Jamaica. 

October. In the 80th. year of his age, at Hath, Anthony Stain>by 
Esq. a gentleman possessed of a large fortune in the islands of Antigua 
and Jamaica. 

At Charlton, in Kent, Mrs. Anne MeCulloh, wife o( Llobert McCul- 
loh K><[. of the [dace, and daughter of George Uoupell Esij. v( Charles* 
town [sic] botltla Carolina. 

Xowmhcr. At Bewrly in Yorkshire, in the 60th." year Oi his age, 
Brigadier General Oliver de Laneey, hoe of New York in North America. 



390 ' Notes and Queries. . 

Marriage*. 

S'-pfetnLcr. George Levins .Fsq. of Haywood, in tlcrefordshirc, to Miss 
Mary Barham daughter of Joseph Foster Barnaul Esfl. of the island of 
Jamaica. 

Promotion*. 

December. William Stafford from half pay of the Maryland Loyalist.-, 
to he surgeon of the 27th. Foot. 

Obituary and Marriage Notices of American interest contained 
in the Toicn and Country Magazine, January to June 1782. — 

January (recently) Sir George Egeton Leigh, Fart., at Savannah in 
Georgia, and formerly Attorney General of that Province. 

February 3. The Right Hon. Lord Colville of Ochiltree, in Yilliars 
street, York Funding-. 

March (recently) The Right lion. Lord Fairfax, at his Proprietary in 
Virginia. 

April 27. The Fight Hon. John. Earl of Loudoun, one of the sixteen 
peers of Scotland, General in the Army, Colonel of the 3rd. Regiment 
of Foot Guards and Governor of Edinburgh Castle. 

May 14- The Fight Hon. Edward, Earl Lieonicr, Lieutenant General 
of his Majesty's Forces, and Colonel of the 9th Regiment of Foot in 
America. 

May 21. Lieutenant General [Robert?] Monckton, Governor of Ports- 
mouth and Colonel of the 17th. Regiment of Foot. 

July 2S. The Al>I>e Reynal at Merlin. 

September 27. Colonel Jonathan Furlong, of the 14th Regiment of 
Foot. 

Marriages. 

April — Captain Christie of the 3d Regiment of Foot Guards, son of 
General Christie to Miss Burton, daughter of the late General Burton. 

May 10. Lloyd Hill Fsq. of the '-13d Regiment to Miss Charlotte 
Malcombe, daughter of the late John Malcombe Esq. surgeon to the 
"West Fencibles. 

May 24. Mr. Edward Rouverie to Miss Murray daughter of the Earl 
of Dunmore. 

May 20. Charles Graham Esq. iafe of the Island of Jamaica, to Miss 
Janet Teaman, second daughter of the late James Yeaman Fsq. of 
Archinlock. 

June 20'. Robert C. Dallas E<q. at Sutton in Suffolk to Miss Harding 
of Pete-ten 31 all in the same county. 

September [prior to] Captain l>ou of the olst. Regiment of Foot to 
Miss Murray niece to the Hon. Lieutenant General Murray. 

Letters of Roiiert L. Hooter, Jr., to Owes Ripple, of Board 

OF WAR, PENNSYLVANIA, 177 7. — 

EAsroS April 9 b 1777 
Sill, 

In obedience to your order* of the 3 In.-t. I have ient F\pres- es thro' 
the greatest part of this County to procure Team*, and have the |deasura 
to inform you that 1 have I icon prdty succe^slull-, as y.uwill see by this 
inclosed Return, which i- hut a part of the uunilttf en.:. i .red, for all my 
Expresses are not yet returned. — 1 ha\e reason t" believe there is now 



Koles (aid Q'lcrics. 301 

gone, ami geting ready to go about eighty Teams from County, and if 
your JJouorable Board think- more Teams will be wanted, I shall be 
glad to receive your positive Commands. 

I found it absolutely necessary to promise the people that they might 
expect to draw Rations, for they were backward in going, fearing it 
would be impossible for them to supply themselves. 

The people go in full expectation of my paying them on their Return 
to this .County, if it is' proper I am very will tog to undertake that trouble. 

I am with great respect 

•Sir your hum'-' Serv* 

lvOB T L. Hooper, Jr.. 

Sac CON April f j th 1777 

Dp: ah Owen - , 

Tell me by a line if I have acted right — I live about 5 Miles South of 
Bethlehem near the Great Road & it is best to order your Express (if 
you send) directly to me — Tell me all the news, and what you think of 
the talked of Invasion — Has France actually lent u.> 5 Million of Livers? 
in haist I am 

Yours 

R. L. Hooper, jr, 
It will be best for me 
to pay the people. 

Letter of the Wife of Ex-Deputy-Goverxor George Thomas 
to Richard Peters, 1753. — 

Sir, 

1 rec' d your obliging Letter since my Arrival here, & am very glad to 
hear you have In joyed your health, so well, for these 2 years past, may 
it Continue for many Years, I am now Settled in my own Country 
where, 1 hope J shall Continue for Life, as I am realy tired of Crossing 
the Seas ec Travelling about the World. I was much afllicted with the 
Gout in my Stomaek & feet in England but have been pretty well .-inee 
I came here, that was the Indisposition I Lay with when Cap ta Rudden 
Left London, I. had it so bad at that time in my Stomaek that I expected 
Death every moment, but the fatigue of Setting up with my Little Girl 
in her illness I believe, made me\vor>e for she was so ill for three months 
with the S l Yitus's Dance that her Life was Dispaired of she had fever 
for 25 Days & nights & her speech Lnr her, she lost all the use of her 
Limb* & every Jovnt in her body was in perpetual motion, but the Cold 
Bath with Gods assistance restored her to health, She is perfectly well 
now and is realy a sensible fine Child but is very Tender. J have a very 
Clever, woman coming over to be a Governess i<> her for 1 can never 
think of parting with her so purpose to have her Educated under my own 
Eye. She read- & Dances & speaks freuch very prettyly & has begun 
to learn to write, so I hope she will. he as Clever as if I ?< at her To Eng- 
land. Mr. Thomas injoys his health very well, lie is now visiting the 
other Islands under his Government \- is not yet returned, I am glad 
to hear you have so good an .Wemhlv, I am surprised the Governor 
does not marn; some ugreable Lady, 1 think it is a great I'itty he doe* 
not get a ^nl wife. I heg my Compliments t » all Mrs. A'> Family, 
Mrs. l'lu instead ».V Mrs. Taylor & family. My LVjppctU often talks of 



392 Noks and Queries. 

Philadelphia, she & her Sisters Desire their Compliments to you & from 
Sir . 

Your most obedient 

Humb ,e Serv 1 

Eliz. Thomas. 

ANTIGUA Feb >'• S" J 1733 

Lettek of Captain James Ikvine, eoramauding officer at Fort 

Allen, to the Indian missionary, Christiau Frederick Post, at Pethle- 
hem, concerning his contemplated journey to Ohio, with Teedyuseung, 
the Delaware Chief : 

Fort Allex Tebruary S^ 17<X) 
SlK 

I have been with Teedenscung & agreeable to your desire, have en- 
quired of him, whether it was the Request of the Indians that you 
should accompany him to Allegheny? he said it was: I then desired 
him to let me know the Time, when he intended to sett oil] that you 
might get ready against then & his answer was in Ten weeks Time — He 
was very sorry you went away before he had spoke with you, & would 
have come to Bethlehem himself, but is Prevented by sickness. 

This morning he sent for me & desired I would Write you word, that 
he has not gott Vv'ampum enough &, that, neither he nor the Young 
Men that is to goe with him have Cloathing sufficient for the Journey; 
he therefore Kegs you would intercede with the Governor for a supply 
of each. Please to send me the Paper by the Bearer of this cv. you will 



much Oblige, 



Your humble Servant, 

James Tuvink. 



Foem of Marriage License in Pennsylvania, 1777. — 

Know all Men by these Presents, That we 

are held and firmly bound unto Es- 

quire, President of the Supreme Executive Council of the Common- 
wealth of Pcnnsi/lva/ua. Captain General and Commander in Chief in 
and over the same, in the Sum of Pounds, to be paid to the 

said Esquire, his certain Attorney, Executors, Administrators 

or Assigns, or his Successors i;i the said Office : To the which Payment 
well and truly to be made, we bind ourselves jointly and severally for 
and in the Whole, our Heirs, Executors, and Administrators, firmly by 
these Present.- — Sealed with our Seals. Dated the Day of 

in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred and 

TllE Condition of this Obligation is such, That if there shall not 
hereafter appear any lawful Let or Impediment, by Reason of any Pre- 
contract, Consanguinity, Affinity, or any other just Cause whatsoever, 
but that the above-mentioned 

may lawfully Marry; and there is not any 
Suit depending before any Judge, for or concerning any such Pre-con- 
tract; and also if the said Parties, and each o\' them are of the full Age 
of Twenty-one Years, and are not under the Tuition of his or her 
Parents, or have the full Cou^cnt of his or her Parents or Guardians 
respectively t<> the said Marriage; and if they, or cither of them, are 
not indented Servants, and do and shall save harmless and keen indem- 
nified the above-mentioned E«piire, his Heirs, Executors, 



Notes and Queries. 303 

and Administrators, or his Successors in .the said Office, for and con- 
cerning the Premises ; and shall likewise save harmless ;.nd keep in- 
demnified the Clergyman, Minister, Of'Verfon who shall join the said 
Parties in Matrimony, for, or by Reason of, his so doi.n;/ ; then this Ob- 
ligation to be Void and oi" none Efiect, or else to stand in full Force and 
Virtue. 

Sealed and Delivered 
in tlcc Presence of 

The Supreme Executive Council of | the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania, 

To any Protestant Minister 

WltEEEAS Application lias been made 
to Us by 

to be joined together in holy Matrimony, and there appearing no lawful 
Let or Impediment by Keason of Pre-Con>raet, Consanguinity, Affinity, 
or any just Cause whatsoever, to hinder the said Marriage : These are 
therefore to license and authorize you to join the said 

in the holy Ponds of Matri- 
mony, and them to pronounce Man and Wife. 

Given' under the letter Seal of the sari Commonwealth, of Philadelphia, 
the Day of in the Year of our Lord One Thousand 

Seven Hundred and 

Achey-Stiegel Genealogical Notes: — Copied by Luther E. 
Kelkcr, of Harrisburg, Penn'a., from an old German Hymn Book. 

Thomas Aehey, Heidelberg Twp. Lancaster Co., Penna. Born Nov. 9, 
1769. Witnesses pre.-ent at his baptism were Thomas Filbert and 
his wife Catherine. He died Nov. 20, 1838. 
■Christine Stiegel, his wife, (daughter of Anthony Stiegel and Christine 
Neip), born Oct. 27, 1771. Witnesses present at her baptism, 
were her grandparents John Neip and bis wife Agatha. 
They were married August 9, 1789, and had issue: 
Chrhline, b. Dec. 11, 1790, d. Febv. 23, 1821. 
John, b. March 25* 1792. 

Catherine, b. March— 1793, d. Dec. 15, 1821. 
Simuel, b. May — 179">. 
Thomas, b. llzx — 1797. 
Hair >/, b. Aujr." 20, 1799, d. Nov. 12, 1331. 
Peter, b. March 2o\ 1802, d. March 9, 1827. 
Charles, b. June 10, ISttf, d. March 2S, 1S39. 
Anthony, b. Oct. 20, 1807, d. July 12, 1S2C. 
Frederic/:, b. Mav 1 2, 1 >n'.i. 
Filbert, b. March 11, 1812, d. Feb. 4, 1S32. 
L>jdia } b. Aug. 14- IS 15. 

Letter of Sam i; el Whartox to ins Brothlu Thomas Whar- 
ton, 177f>. — " 

Dear Brother, 

Under cover 1 send you -a copy of my 9 th instruction to Major Trent. 
and as 1 see very little l*rospecl of true Harmony l>etiig qifcdtlv, if ever, 
restored between this Kingdom and America; No 1 really being a p«.r- 



394 Notes and Queries. 



feet Despot, and for other reasons mentioned in nty letters, by our New- 
Castle friend's brother, — joined to a well grounded apprehension, that 
the Terms of granting Aid-, as prepared. by the Congress (the heads of 
which are come to hand) — a l,t hough completely equal, and just, — will not 
be approved — And this being an important & peculiar Period, when 
the General Congress are honorably and fitly employed in considering 
and stating all the Rights of Americans. I hope you will be of opinion 
with my ingenious friend \y Bancroft & myself, That no time ought 
to be lost before Major Trent & you, heartily co-operate with us, in pre- 
vailing on D r Franklin & other members of the Congress, to procure a 
Eesolve or Declaration (to be entered in their Minutes) of that body, 
expressive of the validity <k sufficiency of a Title to Lamb, fairly bought ' 
of the Aborigines, and held under Grants (only) from them. 

I would fain flatter myself, that before this Letter is received by you, 
the Western Purchase is either made, or is in such favourable train, that 
there is a moral certainty of its completion, and that therefore, there 
would be no danger in your immediately exercising every method in 
your Power, to have the foregoing Resolution passed by the Congress. 
Indeed to obtain it, (>'/ ijera are certain, that the purchase will be made) 
as it would forever render our Title a safe and popular one. I would 
even consent to enlarge the number of Shares to four more than men- 
tioned to Major Trent, so as to take into partnership, tight of the mem- 
bers of the Congress (exclusive of Mr. Henry) and assign to each ot 
them half a share ; ami for this purpose, I give you Liberty in conjunc- 
tion with Mr. Trent, if in Philadelphia,- — To promise such eight Mem- 
bers of the Congress (of which number, my friend George Head to be one 
of them) when you shall be sati.-fied, will assiduously & faithfully unite 
with you, — half a share respectively to them. 

A thousand political rea>ons concur to excite the Congress, imme- 
diately to adopt this measure, some of which are mentioned in the 
within letter to D r Franklin, which is left open for your perusal, and for 
your taking a copy of it and showing it, if you shall think proper, in a 
confidential nwnncr, to any of the members of the Congress. But I be- 
seach of you to take care to do it in a way so. as not to offend D r Frank- 
lin. Seal it before you deliver it. Herewith you will receive four ot 
the Pamphlets respecting the Rights of the Indians to their [torn] soil 
of North America, which I commit to your discretion, only earnestly 
desiring that they may not be given to any person (net even of the Con- 
gress), except upon a solemn promise, of being returned as soon as 
perused. 

'Inclosed you have a few lines for Mr. Trent, which you will be so 
good as to deliver to hi n, and shew him this & the within Letter, ;is I 
have referred him to it. 

With respect to Politicks — the same Plan is persuing, as I mentioned 
in my letter by Capt. Read. Adieu. 

Y" affectionately 

S. W. 

London* August 7 1775. 

F. S. I) r F. is grown old and is not so active as lie was twenty years 
ago, and, however, wcll-dis posed as 1 know he i-, u> establish in America, 
the Rights of the S'ix Nations <ve. to their Territories, :w\d all fair Grants 
obtained from them, yet v. ill be necessary for yon & Major Trent, with 
his concurrance, to take an active part with the other members of the 



Notes and Qaepics. 305 

Congress. Be so good as to deliver D r Franklin one of the Pamphlets 
with hid letter. S. W. 



Daniel Dulaxy the Ku>er. — Mr. 1. at robe, in his "Biographical 
Sketch of Daniel Dulany" in the PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE, Vol. 
III., p. 1, says : "Of the Father of Daniel Dulany, 'Daniel Dulany the 
elder,' as he has been called by way of distinction, not much is known 
beyond what is to be found in the provincial records of Maryland." 

This can measurably be sup plied by the local obituary notice of him 
in the Maryland Gazette of December <>, 1753, namely : 

"Yesterday, about Ten o'clock in the Eveninp:. died, at his House in 
this City, in the CSth Year of his Age, after a long and lingering Ill- 
ness, the Honourable Daniel Dtlany, F*s*| : Commissary General of 
this Province, one of his Lordship's Council of iState, and Recorder of this 
City. During fifty years Residence in Maryland, he always maintained 
an excellent Character, strictly agreeable to the Rules of Honour, Jus- 
tice and Integrity. He came into the Country very young, but by the 
Strength of his natural Parts (which -were extraordinary) and his diligent 
Application, particularly to the Law, he became very eminent in that 
Profession. He formerly served this Country and City many Years, as 
a Member of the Lower Mouse of Assembly ; and possessed several of 
the Greatest cilices of Honour and Trust in the Government ; specially 
that of Attorney General, and Judge of the Admiralty; and in all his 
several Stations he acquitted himself with strict Equity and unwearied 
Diligence. 'He was an humane generous and charitable Gentleman, and 
a great Promoter of the Public Good, by encouraging all kinds of In- 
dustry, towards which he largely contributed, and was very Instrumental 
in settling the back Parts of this Province. He was a tender Husband, 
the best of Fathers, a good Provider and Lover of his Family, a steady 
Friend and kind Neighbour, and truly deserved the Love and Ksteem of 
all Mankind. The Loss of such a Gentleman, to Ids Family in particu- 
lar, and the Country in general, is greatly to be Regretted." 

The records of St. Anne's Church, Annapolis, are incomplete, owing 
to the incidents of frequent changes in the incumbency and to the acci- 
dents of time, and no entry of hi- death and burial can there be found. 
Put in Green's paper of the following week is found this notice of his 
funeral, which points to his burial place. No inscription, however, 
marks this : 

"Tuesday last the F.vly of the Honourable Daniel Dulany, Fsq : Com- 
missary-General of this Province, whose Death we mentioned last 
Week, was honourably Interred in a Vault, prepared for that Purpose, 
near the North Fntranec of the Church : his Pall being supported by 
his Excellency the Governor, Four of his Honourable Council, and the 
Worshipful Mayor of the City." — Mnn/tand Halite, December 13, 1753, 

Sixteen years before, in L737, he had buried his wife, Rebecca, hi the 
graveyard north of the church, and shorth" erected over her remains a 
handsome altar tomb, covered with an Italian marble (dab, which is hi 
fair preservation to this day. On this he had placed a loving inscription 
of fourteen lines, recording his [< «ss and her many virtue-. Reference to 
this is feu iid in the Pi:\n>yi.\ asia Magazine, Vol. 111., p. 230. 
These lines do not fill the Mirfaee, a space bavin,- been left at the foot 
of the stone, designedly, doubtless, to receive his own commendatory 



396 Notes and Queries. . 

notice when he died. But this failed of accomplishment for reason.-* 
now unknown. 

A descendant of his was moved to supply this amission, and obtaining 
the consent of St. Anne's Vestry in November last "to place an in- 
scription on the tombstone of Mrs. Rebecca lailany," has directed the 
following -to be inscribed to his memory thereon : 

"Here lie also the Remains of 
The Honourable Daniel Dulany, Esquire 

Commissary General of this Province 

one of his Lordship's Council of ^tate 

and Recorder of this City 

who died 

5 December 1753 

in the LX VHP 1 Year of his Age" 



T. H. M. 



Queries. 



Allen Genealogy. — The progenitor of the family, Walter Allen, 
settled in Newbury, Essex County, Massachusetts, about 1640, but after 
1C52 lived in Cliajrles town and Watertown Farms, now the town of \\ r €-s- 
ton, in the adjoining county of Middle-sex. Descendants settled in Sud- 
bury, Wayland, Lancaster, llopkinton, Shrewsbury, Dedham, Concord, 
Lincoln, Acton, Koyalston, Hardwiek, Sutton, Xorthboro, Milford, 
Rutland, r.arre, Petersham, FitcKburg, Hubbardston, Groton, Spencer, 
Brookfield, and Palmer, Massachusetts; Dublin, Hillsboro, Mason, and 
Peterboro, Xew Hampshire, and Stonington and Montville, Connecticut. 
So many Aliens are numbered among the early settlers of New England 
that the task of locating their descendants is daily increasing in dilii- 
culty, any one, therefore, believing himself to be a descendant of the 
above is invited to correspond with 

Allen II. Bent, 
22 Williams Street, 

Boston, Mass. 

Lollek. — Genealogical information is requested of the ancestors of 
Robert Loller, founder of Loiler Academy, Hatboro, Penna., a delegate 
to the Constitutional Convention of 17 70, an officer of the Continental 
Army, and Member of the Assembly. 

Jonx \Y, Towns end. 

I3KYN Ma\VR, PeXNA. 

Suypam-*Bennktt. — Geertrine or Charity Suydant, daughter of Ryck 
Suydalri of Flatbush, L. I., married William Bennett ; she died 1 7-1 S, aged 
seventy-seven; he died 177"), aged 9eveuty-thrce. Can any one give me 
the date of their marriage, and tell me who Bennett's parents were? 

A. Melyina Miles, 

Southampton, 

Bucks County, 

lYnna. 

Jonathan Smalley (sec Penna. Magazine, April, 1897, p. 126), 

— Born in Pi^eataway, Middlesex County, New Jer-ey, April 10, 1633; 









Notes and Queries. 397 

did 17C3; married after June, 1707, Sarah Fitz Randolph, born in 
Piscataway, April 25, IG83 ; died before July 27, 1762. 
.Children. 

Isaac, born October 5, 170S. 

John, born June 24, 1712. 

Jonathan, born Oetober 27, 1714. 

Mary, born 31 ay 0, 171G. 

Sarah, born June 20, 1717. 

Hannah married Mollison Fitz Randolph. 

Andrew married Ague* Coriell, February 20, X74.S. 

Martha, born June 21, 1721, married Cornelius Clawson: 

Elizabeth, born February 19, 172j, married Lawrence Faith Septem- 
ber 19, 17-15. 

ADna married William Shreave, January G, 174J. 

Whom did John and Jonathan marry ? 

Isaac, Sarah, and Mary are not named in their father's will. Did 
they die young and unmarried? 

Much information relating to the Pmalley family can be obtained 
from records in State Department, Trenton, County offices at New Bruns- 
wick, Fiseataway Township Minutes, Seventh Day Baptist Church 
records at New Market, and among families of descendants. 

R. E. C. 

Ohl. Family. — Information is desired as to the father and brothers ot 
Henry Olil, born in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, March 21, 17G2; 
also Andrew Ohl, who came from Hanover about 1750, and John Nich- 
olas Ohl, whose son, William, was born March 4, 179G. The ancestor 
of the Ohls emigrated from Germain* about 1740, and settled in North-' 
ampton Countv, Pennsylvania. 

Henry G. Ohl, M.D. 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Df.l any -West. — Information is requested as to the parentage of 
Lydia West, who, December 4, 17S0, was married to Dr. William 
Delany. (a brother of Sharp Delany) by the Rev. Dr." John Fwing, 
pastor, of the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia. A tradition 
exists that she was a cousin of Benjamin West, who painted a portrait 
of one of her children. 

Francis M. Hutchinson. 

Hewes. — James Hewes, born November 4, 1734 ; Abram Hews, son 
of James, born February 3, 17*38 ; James Abram Hewes, son of James 
Abram Hewes, born May IS, 1803. Is Joseph Hewes, bom Kingston, 
New Jersey, 1730, settled at Fdenton, North Carolina, 17C0, any rela- 
tion to any of the above ? 

Telescope. — In April of 17G9 Joseph Richardson purchased, In- 
order of the Assembly, a telescope costiug £170. G. 9. What became of it ? 

T. 

Pnii.iP Sf.rfass. — Genealogical information is requested relating to 
the family of Philip Serfa**, who settled in Pennsylvania prior to 1750. 



398 



Notes and Queries. 



IRcpUes. 

Philip Sekfass. — A Johann Philip Serfass arrived at Philadelphia 

on the ship " Samuel," Captain Hugh Percy, from Rotterdam, in August 
of 1709. With his wife, Mary Catherine, ho lived in the vicinity ol 

Second and Pace Streets untii about the year 17.~>4, when he removed to 
a plantation purchased in Chestnut J 1 1 1 1 Town-hip, now Monroe County- 
He died there iu 178G; the date of his wife's death is not ascertained. 

Descendant? of the name are living in the county. 

JCool; IRoticcs. 

Northampton County, Pennsylvania, in the War for Amer- 
ican Independence. }]y Ethan Allen Weaver. 
There is no county of this Commonwealth whose history has been 
more neglected, notwithstanding the richness of the field, than old North- 
ampton, and hut one work has been published within the last half cen- 
tury with any pretensions to its being a history. Mr. Weaver has 
devoted many years to general researches in its history, and no person is 
better qualified for the work he has in hand. The Revolutionary liistory 
of the county has never been developed, but now it will be given its just 
clue for patriotism, to which it is entitled, for its soldiery participated in 
all the important battles of the war from Canada to South Carolina. 
Easton was a strategic point of much importance and the seat of a mili- 
tary prison and hospital, and in its suburbs was organized Sullivan's 
expedition against the Indians. Bethlehem, more inland, lias also a 
history no less interesting. The muster rolls of militia companies, orderly 
books, and registers of prisoners of war, and much other matter, never 
before printed, will be some of the important and valuable features of 
this forthcoming volume. 



The Pereiomex Region, Past axd Present. Vol. II. — Edited by 
Henry S. Dotterer, 1G05 X. Thirteenth Street, Philadelphia, Bound 

copies, $2.00. 

There is no region in Eastern Pennsylvania so rich in historical 
antiquities as the valley of the Perkiomen, and no worker has wrought 
so industriously in it as the eminently qualified editor of this excellent 
serial. Much of its early history he has collected with great labor and 
unflagging industry, and published it iu the two volumes which have 
been issued. In addition to his local researches, which comprise church 
records, biographies, and genealogies of early settlers, land grants, and 
the names of purchasers, assessment lists and reprint- of original docu- 
ments, the results of his investigations in Europe are presented. Tor 
authentic data and variety of matter, therefore, tlw antiquary and his- 
torical student cannot fail to find much information that is new and 
valuable relating to this historic region. We must also refer, with com- 
mendation, to the typography and general make-up of the magazine. It 
is issued monthly at $1.00 per annum. 

ANNUAL PROCEEDINGS OF THK PENNSYLVANIA SOCIETY SONS OF THE 

Kkvoi.i iiox, 18WM0O0. Edited by Kthan Allen Weaver. Sccre- 
retary. Bvo., <»i pages. 
Prom the report before us we find that this influential Society with a 
membership of upward of eleven hundred descendants of Revolutionary 



Notes and Queries. 300 

heroes continues annually to celebrate th- anniversaries of prominent 
events connected with the war for indeoemu nee 1:1 this Mate. On June 
10 the Society visited l'aoii, where Hampton L. Carson, Esq., delivered 
an excellent historieal address on the adlitan servicer of General Wayne, 
which is printed in the proceedings. The Society also contemplates 
placing a tahlet in the courtyard of :he City Hail, io mark a part of the 
camp site of I iochainbi.au 's army when en route to Yorktown, and one 
on the school building on Third Street above XobW, which stand* on the 
western bounds of the army barracks of Colonial and Revolutionary 
days. A fund is also being raised to erect a statue of General Anthony 
Wayne that will be an honor 10 the Society and to the Commonwealth. - 

Physic and Its PitAfTisEr.s in Old Northampton. An Historical 
Sketch for the Jubilee Meeting of the Medical Society ^North- 
ampton Countv. P»v Charles Mclntire, A.M., M.D. Easton, 
Penna., 1900. " Pp. 04. 
This monograph of J.)r. Mclntire covers the medical history of North- 
ampton County from 1742 to 1SU0, and contains biographical sketches of 
the twentyvfive surgeons and physicians who practised their profession 
during that period. The reputation of Doctors. John Frederick and 
John Matthew Otto, .and Andrew I^edlie, during the Provincial and Rev- 
olutionary periods, and John Cooper, John F. Kudo'lphi, and others of a 
later date, extended beyond the confines of the county, not only for their 
medical but scientific attainments* Dr. Mclntire has devoted much 
patient research to his work, which is not only a valuable contribution 
to local history, but also to the medical history Of the Commonwealth. 

Historical Collkctions lklatixgto Tin: Potts Family in Great 
Britain and America, Including a Hlstokic-Gexealogy of 

THK DESCENDANTS OF DAVID POTTS, AN pAULY AnGLOAVll.SH 
SlHTLLL OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

The above work, which will be a handsome octavo of over five hun- 
dred pages and illustrated with portraits, homesteads, coats-of-arms, auto- 
graphs, and ancient documents, is now in pros. The first part, "The 
Potts Family in Great Iiritakt," is by the late William John Potts, whose 
geneological researches are so well known. Part second, "The Potts 
Family in America," and part third, "David Potts of Philadelphia 
County and his Descendants," to the eleventh generation, are by the 
compiler. The price of the work is fixed at $0.00 per copy. Address 
Thomas Maxwell Potts, Canonsburg, Penna. 

The Historical Record. A Quarterly Publication devoted princi- 
pally to the Early History of the Wyoming Valley and Contiguous 
Territory, with Notes ami Queries, Biographical, Antiquarian, and 
Geneological. Edited by F. C. Johnson, \\ "ilkes-Parre, Pennsyl- 
vania. 
The special aim of the "Historical Record" i> indicated in its title- 
page; and Volume VIIi., bound, which has been recently received, 
maintains the reputation which it has so l<>:iL, r enjoyed. No valley in 
this Commonwealth is ?o rich in its historical associations as the Wyom- 
ing Valley, and through l>r. Johnson's researches we are statedly pre- 
sented with data, historical ami ecnealojical, that would Otherwise be 
lost. Orders for copies should be forwarded to the editor. 



400 Notes and Queries. 






The Constitution and Register of Membership or the General 
Society of the War op 1S12, to October 1, 1SO0. Compiled 
by Captain Henry Hobart Bellas, U.S.A., Secretary-General. 
Philadelphia, 1S99, pp. 'I'M. 
This Society was organized September 1-1, ISM ; reorganized January 
9, 185-1, and instituted Api il 1 t, 181)4. Among its mouthers are seven- 
teen veterans of the war; Daniel Jliekley, aged over 103 years, who 
served in the defence of Baltimore, being a resident of Pennsylvania. 
In nine States soeieties have been organized. Pennsylvania leading with a 
membership of about three hundred. The book is very attractive in 
appearance, and the data valuable and interesting., 



The Wade Genealogy. By Stuart C. Wade. New York, 1900. 
Part I. Svo, pp. 9G, illustrated. Price, $1.00. Apply to com- 
piler, 14G W. Thirty-fourth Street, New York City. 
This work gives some account of the origin of the name, and of the 
lost folk-story of the famous hero, Wade; particulars and pedigrees ot 
famous Englishmen of the name and genealogies of the families ot 
Wade of Massachusetts and Xew Jersey, to which are added many mis- 
cellaneous pedigrees ; also a roll of honor of the Wades who went to 
war. It is illustrated with portraits, coats-of-arms, and foe-similes of old 
documents and family papers. 

On the Frontier with Colonel Antes, or the Struggle for 
Supremacy of the Bed and White Race in Pennsylvania. 
By Edwin MacMinu. Camden, 1900. Price, S3. 00. 
The Rev. Mr. MeMinn some years ago wrote a life of Henry Antes, a 
prominent figure in the religious movement among the Germans of East- 
ern Pennsylvania, 178.3-1750. The subject of his present work, a son 
of the former, was an active participant in the civil and military history 
of the Commonwealth, particularly on the Susquehanna and its branches. 
It is liberally illustrated. . 

History of the People of the United States. By John Bach 

McMaster. Xew Y'ork : D. Appleton & Co. Volume V., with 

map. 

The ii fill volume of Professor McMaster's history covers the time of 

the administration of John Quincy Adams, and to the verge of the great 

anti-slavery conflict in that of Andrew Jackson. In some respects the 

volume is historically more valuable than several of the preceding ones, 

but the same scientific skill in arrangement and succinct style of writing 

are characteristic as in the others. 

Notes on the Families of Wager, Wirt/, Hofser, Baker, 

SCHRIENER, AND POTTER, OE PHILADELPHIA, by Thomas Allen 
Glenn, is the last contribution to local genealogy which, lias been re- 
ceived. It has been carefully compiled and is neath printed. The 
edition is limited. 



THE 



PENNSYLVANIA MAGAZINE 



OF 



HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 



Vol. XXIV. 1900. No. 4, 



LIFE OF MAPGAEET SMIPPEN, WIFE OF BENEDICT 

AKXOLD. 

BY LEWIS BTRD WALKER. 

(Continued from page 2CG.) 

After the death of William Allen, and a few months 
before his own death, in a hand trembling with age, he 
penned the following to his sons, who were absent : 

"Edward Shippcn of Lancaster Esquire, To his Sons Edward and 
Joseph, Lancaster the 28 May 1781. 

"This may inform You that before I came to live here William 
(Allen) Esq, made me a present of a small tract, of Land in Lucks 
County in the Province of Pennsylvania, on Acct of my Assisting him 
in the Location of his Land, but on my letting him know that I had 
rather have some Lots opposite to the New Market to the South of the 
City of Philadelphia he exchanged with me, and Signed me a Deed for 
ye Lots opposite to the New Market, but I dont remember that ever 1 
delivered up to him ye said Deed for the said Small Tract ol Land in 
Pucks County aforesaid which I lately looked for, but could not find 
it; but found whenever it may be, it must in Conscience be cancelled." 

He died at Lancaster, September 25, 1781, before the 
news of the surrender of Cornwallis reached liiin, though his 
■ faith in the ultimate triumph of America never wavered. 
vol. XXIV.--2G ( 401 ) 



402 Life of Margaret Shipper*, Wife of JJ< ncdlrl Arnold. 

His monument stands in the rear of the church of St. 
James at Lancaster, where his- remains have, in the course 

of time, been surrounded by those of his descendants. 

• EDWAKD SHIPPEX AND THE FAMILY OF TENCH FRANCIS. 

Edward Shippea (afterwards chief-justice) was born in 
the city of Philadelphia on February 16, 1729. As it was 
determined that he should become a lawyer, in 1743 he 
entered the office of Tench Francis, then and for many years 
afterwards Attorney- General of Pennsylvania, and there 
acquired a practical knowledge of law and legal forms from 
the best of all teachers, Experience. 

But inasmuch as Edward Shippen was destined to follow 
an old custom, and marry his preceptor's daughter, the 
following brief account of Tench Francis and his family 
will not be inappropriate. 

Tench Francis, though of English parentage, was born in 
Ireland, and emigrated to Maryland shortly after the year 
1700. His brother Philip was the Hither of the celebrated 
Sir Philip Francis. From Maryland, Tench Francis re- 
moved to Philadelphia, where he became the leading lawyer 
of his time. lie was counsel for the Proprietors from 1740 
to 1744; attorney-general from Xovcmber 5, 1742, to 
January 14, 1755, and was recorder of Philadelphia from 
1750 to 1754. As a frightful example of the fees of 
lawyers in those days, we quote the following extract from 
his letter dated February 21, 1744, to Thomas Penn. 

"I lately had the favour of yours of the 8th of August last and soon 
after the Govcrnour was pleased to mention a sum for my services in 
general for three year* ending in October (as I kept no account nor could 
be particular in any charges for that time) which I received and am 
satisfied. Aceo-ding to what you mention in your Letter he named f>0L 
for' an annual Sallary to which I submitted without objection. As I 
cant possibly foresee with what trouble my Duty may be attended I 
should full us willingly have left it entirely to your own consideration at 
the end of every year, but perhaps that might have been less agreeable 
to you, and therefore I am contented as it is." 



Life of Margaret Skippen, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 403 

In 1724 .Tench Francis married Elizabeth Turlmtt, of 
Maryland, and had the following children : . 
Jonx, horn 1725 ; died unmarried. 

Anne, horn 1727, married to James Tilghman; had, 
among others, the following children, viz. : 

Tench Iilgjiman, who was aide-de-camp to Washington. 
Elizabeth Tjlgiiman. 

William Tilghman, afterwards Chief-Justice of Penn- 
sylvania. . 
Anne (Francis) Tilghman died in 1771. 
Mary, born 1729, married William Coxe. 
Tench, born 1730, married February 8, 17C2, to Ann Wil- 
ling, who was born July 16, 1733. Concerning- this match 
Edward Shippcn (C.-J.) wrote to Ins father as follows, on 
January 11, 17G2: 

"When you find my Mother, Sister, & Miss Patty laughing by Die 
fire Side and inclinable to hear News, tell them Cousin Nancy Willing 
is just going off the Stage ; a Decree of perpetual Virginity seemed to 
have been passed against her, When a gay young Fellow just arrived 
from London having sett up a Chariot with five & twenty thousand 
Pounds in his Pockett, laid Siege to Castle & in three days the Garrison 
surrendered upon honourable Terms; in short, a Match is concluded 
between her & Tenny Francis, and I suppose All will be over in as many 
weeks as the Courtship has taken up Days." 

Elizabeth, horn 1733, married John Lawrence; died 
1800. 

Margaret, horn 1735, married to Edward Shippcn 
November 29, 1753; died 170-1. 

Raciiael, born 1737, married John Rclfe March, 17G0, 
and afterwards to Matthew Pearce. 

Turbutt, horn 1710; died 1707. 

Philip, born 174S. 

After this short digression we return to Edward Shippcn, 
who, at the end of five years' apprenticeship in the ollice, 
felt that a coarse of study in London would not only benefit 
him intellectually, but would also give him prestige in his 
profession. He accordingly sailed from Philadelphia, and, 



I 



1 

404 Life of 3laryaret SMppen, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

after experiencing a storm which almost sunk the ship, 
reached London in February, 1749, and entered the Temple. 
In the summer of 1749 he visited Versailles and Paris, and 
was greatly impressed with the grandeur and elegance 
which he beheld. Tie spent some little time in travelling in 
England, and returned home in the summer of 1750, after 
having been made a barrister of the Middle Temple. 

Whether or not it be true that " absence makes the heart 
grow fonder," certain it is that it did not take him long to 
send the following letter to his father : 

-v Philadelphia, June 8, 1750. 

"Hox'dSir: 

"My Mind has been much employed for about a Twelvemonth past 
about au aiuiir, which, tho' oftcu mentioned to you by others, has never 
beeu revealed by myself, and, as I can now no longer bear the anxiety of 
mind which a state of suspense in matters of consequence is always 
attended with, I must open myself to you and beg your best advice and 
assistance. Miss Peggy Francis has for a long time appeared to me the 
most amiable of her Sex, and tho' I might have paid my Addresses, pos- 
sibly with success, where it would have been more agreeable to you, yet 
as Our Affections are not always in our Power to command, ever since ray 
Acquaintance with this young Lady I have been utterly incapable of 
entertaining a thought of any other. I know, Sir, your Sentiments of 
these matters are more than usually generous and therefore I can with 
the greater Confidence ask your consent in this A flair, especially when I 
assure you 'tis the only Thing can make me happy. If 1 had obtained 
a Girl with a considerable Fortune, no doubt the world would have pro- 
nounced me happier, but, as in my own Notion, Happiness does not con- 
sist in being thought happy by the World, . but in the internal Satisfac- 
tion and Contentment of the Mind, I must beg leave to say I am a 
better Judge for myself of what will procure it than they: yet lam not 
bo carried away by my Passion as to exclude the consideration of 
money matters altogether; without a Prospect of a comfortable subsist- 
ence, 'tis madness to marry. That Prospeet 1 think I have. With a 
little Assistance in setting out, my P>u-iness, with Frugality, cant fail to 
maintain me, and a bare support with one 1 love is to me a much pref- 
erable State to great affluence witli a Person one regards wi:h indiffer- 
ence. P>e pleased, Sir, to let me know your sentiments of this ail'air as 
soon as possible. For tho' 1 might not press a very speedy conclusion 
of it, yet I am anxious to know my Fate. I am. Dear Sir 
11 Your Very atlectionate and dutiful Sou 

' ' F I > W A n D Sll I P 1' E .V. J D N R." 



IJfc of Margaret Shipper, Wife of Benedict Arnold* 405 

The reply to this letter was favorable, and his father gave 
him a house on "Walnut Street in anticipation of his mar- 
riage to Margaret Francis, -which took place November 29, 
1753. 

In 1755. the defeat of Braddock caused great alarm 
throughout the Province, hut the danger eventually roused 
the military spirit of the people, and we find that cool- 
headed Edward Shippen was also infected hy it, for the re- 
ceipt for his regimental suit, as it is called, is now before us, 
as well as the receipt for a sword, which is curiously item- 
ized, being divided into charges for the hilt, the blade, the 
lining of the hilt,. and the scabbard. A striking figure, no 
doubt, was he, when, clad in Ins scarlet, regimental suit 
ornamented with live and one-half dozen double <nlt but- 
tons (no less), and his beaver hat trimmed with a yard and 
a half of gold lace, he mounted that wonderful saddle, 
which is described in the bill as, " A Demipeick Sadie, 
with a Buckskin Seat Quilted, & Morocco Leather burrs k 
bolsters, & a Ilivited tree, k a Sadie Oloath, & a Double 
Iiain'd Bridle, Silver washed buckcls, & Green & Red Frunt, 
and a Green Cloath housings fring'd, & a Large Flower 
Embroidered in Each Corner of ye housings with Gold 
Thread, & a pair of Brass Stirrups," and, with the aforesaid 
hilt, blade, and scabbard all at his side, was prepared to 
defend his country as a private soldier in the Independent 
Troop of Horse. 

But his brother, Colonel Joseph Shippen, and his brother- 
in-law, Colonel James Burd, did the actual military service 
for the family in this war, and Edward Shippen returned to 
his duties as judge of the Vice-Adiniialty Court, to which 
oflice he had been appointed on November 22, 1752, and 
which lie held till the Revolution. 

Evidentlv'he was net insensible to the "ood things of life, 
for when he gave a dinner in 1755 to the court officials, at 
the tavern kept by Mary Jones, he provided a turtle him- 
self, and such was its size that the oven had to be taken 
down " to dress the tortlc," and - Mr. Mc Call's wench" was 



406 Ufe of Margaret Sldpppi^ Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

called in to help with the cooking; all of which is set down 
in the bill, along with the " Punch" and ""Wine" and 
" Clarctt" and the " English Beer." 

In the ten years that followed Edward Shippcn's return 
from England his business had increased, honors had been 
bestowed upon him, and, having chosen the woman he 
loved, his marriage had been blessed with children : 

Elizabeth, born September 15, 1754. 

Sarah, born February 1, 1756. 

Mary, born August 15, 1757. 

Edward, born December 11, 1758. 

And now, at the commencement of the second decade 
since his return to America, with heart elated, he writes as 
follows to his father : 

"Philada. 11th June 1760. 

"Hon.d Sot: 

" Mr. Dow brought me the Acct & Letter you sent to General Stanwix 
and he informed me he would at any time pay me (for your Acct) the 
full sum carried out by you ; But desires that you will immediately send 
me down the several Vouchers/ as he will certainly sail for England 
next Week. 

''My Peggy this morning made me a Present of a fine Baby, which 
tho' of the worst Sex, is yet entirely welcome ; You see my Family 
encreases apace; I am however in no fear by the Blessing of God but 
I shall be able to do them all tolerable Justice. It is but staying a few 
years longer before I ride in my Coach 

"My kind Love to Mammy, Sister Sec. ; 
"I am dear Sir; 

"Your very dutiful Affect. Son, 

"Edw. Shippek jk." 

And this the record of her birth, on June 11, 1760, is the 
first inention of "Peatcy Shinnen." 

A few years longer^ and this fond and doting father did 
in truth ride in his coach; and in after-years he was called 
upon to administer justice to many, but none of all who 
came before him stood more in need ot^ justice than his host 
beloved daughter, who, though her body has been com- 
mitted* to earth for nearly a century, is yet the victim of 
calumny and injustice. 



IJfe of Margaret Sh>ppcn, Wife of JBencdict Arnold. 407 

But, as Pcltlt lay in her cradle, where were the lovers 
who would clierish, and the friends who would aid and pro- 
tect her ? Far, far away were they, and the enemy who 
would most foully injure her was, perhaps, under the same 
roof with her. 

In the old Chateau of Chavigniac in Auvergne, an orphan 
boy nearly three years old, in June, 1760, was in charge of 
his nurse, perhaps gazing at the Allier, flowing first north 
and, after joining the Loire, then westward to the Atlantic; 
and had some astrologer been there to prognosticate the 
future of Lafayette, he might have likened it to the river, 
for he went first northward to Paris, and then westward 
across the Atlantic to achieve fame. 

But over the mountains, eastward from Chavigniac, there 
is another river, called the Phone, and in the town of 
Geneva, where the river issues from Lake Leman, a lad of 
nine years, John Andre by name, was going to school. 
And if by chance he wandered down to the edge of the 
tongue of land between the Arve and the Phone lie could 
have seen the clear water of the Phone flowing side by side 
with the muddy. water of the Arve, but not polluted by it. 
And hacl he been able to read the future he might have 
found in the river an emblem of his own fate; for the dis- 
grace of the gibbet was to touch him, yet not to sully hi3 
fame. 

In Xorwieh, Connecticut, a young man not quite twenty 
years of age was finishing his career as an apprentice in a 
drug store, and as soon as he was of age he began business 
for himself witli the sign : 

ft Arnold, 
Druggist, Book*eilcr, &c, 

Sibi Toti'iuo. 

Frederick von Steuben, wounded in the battle of Kuners- 
dorf, was shortly afterwards taken prisoner ami confined in 
a Pussian prison. 



408 Life of Margaret Skippm, Wfc of Benedict Arnold. 

Down in the West Indies^ Alexander ITamiltcm, three 

years old, was still in the lap of hi 3 Huguenot mother. 

While strolling over his grounds on the banks of the 
Potomac, with a little stepson of seven at his heels, was 
George Washington, in his twenty-ninth year, the happiest 
bridegroom in America. So happy was he, that we cannot 
but smile when we read of the problem he was endeavoring 
to solve. " Would any one believe," he writes, " that with 
one hundred and one cows ... I must still buy butter for 
my family ?" 

Nathanael Greene had just completed his eighteenth year, 
and it might have been at this very period when, according 
to the story of one biographer, he stole away from his bed- 
room to attend a ball in the neighborhood. If he thought 
that his lather, the Quaker preacher, was asleep when he 
made his exit through the window, he found him awaiting 
his return with a horse-whip ; and after slipping some 
shingles under his coat he submitted to the castigation 
without a murmur. 

Who would have thought that all these men, so widely 
separated, would ever meet together? Yet, through many 
strange adventures, through dangers on land and perils by 
sea, through storms, through prisons, and through battles, 
were they to pass for twenty years, and, with the unerring 
certainty of fate, they each and all took their places on the 
sta^e in the irreat tragedy of the American Revolution, the 
treason of Arnold, in the fall of 1780. 

But there is one more character who claims our attention. 
. Aaron Burr, born February G, 175G, was, in the year 1700, 
an inmate of the house of Dr. William Shippcn, whither he 
had been taken after the death of his parents. Perhaps 
he was even taken to Edward Shippen's residence, and saw 
the new-born baby in her cradle. And how did Aaron 
Burr show his gratitude to that family the members of 
which had been friends of his father, that family whose 
roof had sheltered him, of whose food he had partaken, 
and under whose protection he had lived when an orphan 



- 



Life of Mar (jar d Shippoi, Wife of Bene did Arnold. 409 

boy? lie repaid these benefits by inflicting upon Margaret 
Arnold, when she was in deepest distress; the worst insult 
man can offer to woman, and thirty year3 after she was laid 
in her grave lie still sought to injure her reputation. 

EARLY LIFE OF MARGAKLT S1IIPPEX. 

Of Pegg} r Shippen's childhood we have no direct accounts. 
However, her first cousin, " Xeddy" Burd (who afterwards 
married her eldest sister, Elizabeth), came down from Lan- 
caster to finish his education and study law under her 
father, Edward Shippcn ; and " Xcddy's" letters to his sister 
and grandfather give us some insight into the circumstances 
of the familv, as well as the news and customs of the town. 
First is a letter dated April 28, 1705 (he was born February 
5, 1751), descriptive of his admission to college, as follows: 

" About three weeks ago our Class was alarmed with the news of being 
examined by the Trustees. Luckily we had three days to prepare for it. 
All which time we were much afraid of the Jssue. I sat up until eleven 
o'clock & rose before five studying very hard. At length the much 
dreaded day arrived. "We were conducted into the Electricity room, 
Where the Itevd. Mr. Duchee, Mr. Stedman, Dr. Alison, & Mr. 
Beveridge were assembled. You may inform Grandpapa that we were 
fir?>t desired to translate a piece out of English into Latin, then we were 
examined in Horace & lastly in Homer. The public Examination ot 
the Senior Class was next day ; When we were again desired to attend 
at the Elcctricitv Room. Mr. Stedman spoke as follows, viz — On 
account of your Yesterday's extraordinary performance Ye are admitted 
into Colledge." 

Next comes a letter dated January 14, 17G7, giving an 
account of some robbers, and concluding with theatrical 
intelligence, as follows : 

"There is a nest of Robbers here which makes People more careful 
about their Houses. Two Fellows Hagarty & Morrison at Noon Day 
went into the Street Door of the Gov'rs House & stole two Silver Candle- 
sticks out of the Pantry at the other End of the House they were happily 
detected & have received their Punishment. The same Morrison went 
into a Tavernkecpcrs House (before the other Theft) & bore oil" a Man's 
great Coat from the Back of his Chair while He warmed himself at the 



410 Life of Margaret Skippen, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

Fire,, but was not catched. The same two Fellows & Consiglio & Bow- 
man went into a Tavernkcepcr's House & carried off a Mahogany Chest 
full of Player's Cloaths from a Koodi up two Pair of Stairs while the 
Family were at Supper. 

"Uncle J. S. made me a present of a Ticket to see the Play. Mr. 
JIallam is Die best Actor according to the common Opinion, but I am 
fonder of Mr. Allyn. Miss Cheer & Miss Wainwright are the best 
Actresses ; the Latter is the best Woman Singer & Mr. Wools is their 
excellent Man Singer. James Godwin who used to be Mr. Ti-jli's 
dancing Boy dances & acts upon the Stage. They say He gets £4 per 
Week." 

Next comes some fashionable intelligence in a letter of 
November 17, 17G7 (to properly appreciate this we must 
keep in mind the fact that J. Willing was not seventeen 
years old when the letter was written), together with some 
more dramatic news, as follows : 

"Some young Gentlemen have subscribed to an Assembly for this 
Season. Among the Principal Managers are Billy Allen & Jemmy 
Willing. The Subscribers may send a Ticket to any Young Lady for the 
Evening; Notwithstanding which Priviledge J. Willing tells me that 
He is almost tired of. it because the Girls are so little. 

"The Players must soon leave off here & will not be again permitted 
to act these two Years. They are going to New York but it is believed 
that the Opposition will be strong enough to prevent their acting there." 

The Assembly managed to continue without J. AYilling's 
approval, for in a letter dated December 15, 17GS, it is said : 

"The Dutchess of Gordon is to appear -to Night at the Assembly & 
is to be richly deckt with Diamonds <fe other Jewels & dressed most 
splendidly in Silver Silks. Neither She or Coll. Morris chu-e to dance 
whenever they can avoid it, and therefore the Company will be deprived 
of the Honour of dancing with a Dutchess. She has nothing to boast 
of with Regard to her Face or Person. Yet she is well esteemed as She 
is pretty sociable and dont seem to require that Pre-eminence over other 
Ladies which the York Ladies are so ambitious of." 

Another lively picture is found in "Neddy's" account of 

how Briltanuiu did not win the race, — viz. : 

"I was yesterday at the Paces, when four Horses viz, Lath, Nonpa- 
reil, Govr. Sharp's Mare called P.rittannia A ye Irish Horse started fr>ra 



Life of Mar (jar d Shippen, Wife of Benedict Arnold* 411 

purse of One hundred rounds ; — the first Heat the Irish Horse was 
almost distanced & was lamed so much that he was taken olF the Field. 
At his first setting out, upon bis gaining a little Advantage, the Irish 
set up such a Halloo as almost stunned me, but at hi.- coming in tbey 
disowned him intir.ely, that be ivaa an Irish Horse but only an engli.-h 
One imported 1i<tc by Way of Ireland. 

"Lath won the purse in two Heats ; ye first Pleat followed closely by 
Brittannia, & ye second Heat by Nonpareil. 

"The Keeper of Brittannia, after the Kace, said with a very confident 
Air, that Brittannia was very well able to beat either Lath or Nonpareil ; 
— that he had purposely desired the Rider to lose the first Heat to Lath, 
that he had no doubt of Nonpareil's getting the second heat from Lath 
& therefore he ordered his Jockey to permit Nonpareil to win the second 
Heat; — & then Brittannia would gain the third and fourth Heats by 
which Means more Sport might be atibrdexi to the Ladies and Gentlemen. 
This is a Specimen of what lengths these honest Jockeys will give to 
their Tongue to save the Credit of a Horse or cozen a simple Fellow out 
of his Money. 

"The Commons is a mere Camp ; I believe there are 100 Booths 
erected there for the Entertainment of the Lower Class of People; from 
which frequent Battles ensue ; as those People think it a Time of Merri- 
ment & consequently they must get drunk; when being like Ships 
without Helms they unavoidably run foul of each other." 

Next we find him with some homespun, which he had 
made up into a coat, concerning which he says: 

"I shall be very proud of wearing a Coat which was spun in our 
Family & for that Keason think I had better wear it while ye Revenue 
Act remains unrepealed." 

But soon " Neddy" was overwhelmed with commissions 
to execute for the folks at home. After buying for Granny 
yarn " as near the Colour of the sample as could lie got," 
and lemons and the last Gloucester cheese in Philadelphia, 
" hut unless this had been procured You must have waited 
for English Cheese untill the Agreement of our Merchants 
about Non-Importation should he dissolved by a Repeal of 
the Revenue' Act," and tor his inland father nearly every- 
thing from a bottle of red ink to twenty-five gallons of 
molasses, and from salmon to saddle-bags, " Neddy'' gives a 
complete list of Philadelphia booksellers who have not got a 



7 


3 


9 


3 





6 


2 


8 







9 





9 


10 


5. 



Then, in place of Adams Express, we have the receipt of 
Robert Gordon, who promised to cany and deliver to the 
bride's father, " two wooden Chests one Box with a Padlock 
and two Small Boxes without a lock a Gammon of Bacon 
& three Xcats Tungs a Hair Portmanteau Trunk two Small 
Cag3 all which Chests & Boxes are filled with Goods and 
received one Barrel of Malt Beer." 

In truth, " Neddy's'' folks seemed to want everything from 
citron for " minced peyes" to the Bishop of LlandarTs sermon, 
and from basket salt to French newspapers and English 
leather, not omitting water-dogs and black-eyed rabbits. So 
busy was he with these various commissions, and his legal 
studies and law writings, when " 2f>50 Germans were natu- 
ralized at one Court .;" that lie had no time for anything 



412 Life of Margaret Shipjwi, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

copv of " Sententne Pueriles," but says he thinks lie can get 
one with the first two leaves torn out, from a boy ! This boy 
was one who studied his books so hard that there was noth- 
ing left when he got through, for when " Xeddy" went for 
the book two more leaves were crone. ■ J 

Molly Burds marriage to Peter Grubb, the Cornwall 
iron-master, was the occasion of the following message : " In 
the Box Aunt Shippen says she has sent Thread Lace in- 
stead of Blond Lace because it will wash and be very ser- 
viceable — Handkerchiefs She says, are quite out of Fashion, 
in the Boom of which She has sent a Tippet & Tucker, 
which is the present Mode." 

The following account for the bride's trousseau will form 
an interesting subject for comparison with similar accounts 
at the present day. The total was £31 5s. 8d., made up as 
follows : 

"14 Yards Mantua Silk . . . .£880 
1 Ps Irish Linnen 25 Yds at .5/9 

1 Silk Cloak 

3 Yds Cambrick at 16 

A Necklace ..... 

For a laced Cap, Eufiles, Tippet & tucker 



Life of Maryird Shippm, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 413 

else. No, we nre mistaken; he did manage to find time to 
follow a good precedent, and fell heels over head in love 
with Elizabeth Shippen. We think that this fact had some- 
thing to do with the pleasing alacrity with which he exe- 
cuted commissions which sometimes have an irritating effect 
upon the masculine temper. For when Granny's quilted 
silk petticoat was sent to him to he dyed yellow, it was of 
course necessary to hold various consultations with " Aunt 
Shippen/' which always gave him an excuse to see "Betsy." 
That silk petticoat lias quite a history in "Neddy's" letters. 
First, "Aunt Shippen says that there is a very good Dyer 
in Town lately from 'Scotland that she has seen Things dyed 
by him Green & blue but has never seen any Tiling dved 
yellow by him — that she thinks he excels in dying (?) green 
And that he also dyes a very good blue." Next we hear 
that the dyer has no yellow dye. Then Aunt Shippen 
orders it to be dyed blue, as a compromise. But that dyer 
has the failing (not yet wholly eradicated in his trade) of 
not being as prompt as his word; for, a month later we arc 
told: "Notwithstanding the promises of the Dyer, he has 
not dyed it yet." It is while "Neddy" is wrestling with this 
not living but dyeing question that we hear the first words 
of little Voggy. He is writing to his grandfather, Edward 
SMppen, and says: " Cousin 1 y cggy Shippen stands over my 
Shoulder & particularly desires her Love to Grandmama & 
yourself." 

During these passing years " Peggy" Shippen was not 
idle. She had become an expert with her needle; had 
been instructed in drawing, dancing, and music; which 
merely constituted her accomplishments; in addition to 
which, we have her own words, written when she was forty- 
two, that she had received " the most useful and best educa- 
tion that America at that time afforded." 

Though our opportunities of examining the correspondence 
of ladies who were contemporary with her are limited, 
yet we can without hesitation say, that for beautiful penman- 
ship, correct expression, and literary style and interest the 



414 Life of Margaret Shippen, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

letters of Margaret Arnold are far superior to those of her 
sisters and cousins, or "Becky" Franks and Ann Penn. 

Mrs. Gibson says (Shippen Tapers, li.) : " I inay add iny recollections 
of my mother's general opinion of Mrs. Arnold, often expressed to others 
as well as to myse.f. Being intimately acquainted with Mr. Shippen's 
family, she well understood their several characteristics, and would dwell 
with pleasure on the affectionate and exemplary conduct of Mrs. Arnold, 
both before and after her marriage. She used to say that Miss Veggy 
Shippen was particularly devoted to her father, making his comfort her 
leading thought, often preferring to remain with him when evening par- 
ties and amusements would attract her sisters from home. She was the 
darling of the family circle, and never fond of gadding. There was 
nothing of frivolity either in her dress, demeanor, or conduct, and though 
deservedly admired, she had too much good sense to be vain. ... I 
have often heard her speak with deep feeling of the sad fate of this most 
excellent woman ; of her great purity of mind and principles, &c. M 

In this eonstant companionship with her father she in- 
sensibly imbibed correct principles of business which were 
of the greatest use in the settlement of her husband's estate. 

Xext to her father, her sister Elizabeth exercised most 
influence over her. Indeed she seems to have regarded 
Elizabeth as a pattern for her to follow, and in one letter 
she writes to her sister, "I can never do better than to 
follow your example." 

The clouds of the devolution had gathered, and soon the 
6torm was to burst. The first Congress had met, and great 
was the hubbub and controversy. On September 2S, 1774, 
Edward Shippen brought home to dinner a tall, grave pro- 
vincial officer, who was a delegate from Virginia, and thus 
Mistress Peggy, then in her fifteenth year, first met that 
great man of whom she afterwards wrote : M Nobody in 
America could revere his character more than I did." And 
we may be sure that the beautiful girl, in the bloom of 
opening womanhood, listening attentively 'to the conversa- 
tion, attracted the notice oi' George Washington, for he was 
the guest at that "Wednesday's dinner. It was her grace 



Life of Margaret Shtppen, Wfc of Benedict Arnold. 415 

awl loveliness thai, six years later, drew forth one of the 
pleasantries lie so seldom uttered. " Ah, marquis P* said he 
to Lafayette, "you $6ung men arc all in love with Mrs. 
Arnold. Go you and breakfast with her, and tell her not 
to wait for me." 

Soon the news of Lexington and Concord inflamed the 
spirit of the people, and Betsy Shipper) 's lover shared the 
enthusiasm. In an answer to his request for a drum from 
the Lancaster Barracks, Jasper Yeatcs replied that " there 
were hut three or four old Shells here without heads, which 
have already heen made Use of by the Towns People." 

And on June 30, 1775, Edward Shippen wrote to his 
father at Lancaster: 

"I find Neddy Burd has taken a Resolution to go Lieutenant to one 
of the Conipanys of Riflemen to Boston. I wrote him my Sentiments 
upon this step the other day, and represented to him that not having 
been used to the "Woods; nor to bunting, nor the Use of Rifles, he 
would be deemed a very unfit person fcr that Service, and that it would 
appear to all the world a ridiculous thing for a young Man bred in an 
Office to attempt to command Riflemen, who are expected to be men 
bred in the Woods and enured to Hardships. I suppose however Neddy 
will consider himself as too far engaged now to retract." 

In spite of ridicule, so hard for a spirited young man to 
bear, "Xeddy" stuck to his determination, and joined the 
army. No doubt Betsey thought of liim as a knight of old, 
and Peggy regarded him as a veritable paladin. If he had 
performed unheard-of feats -of bravery, and put the whole 
British army to Hight, it would have heen no more than the 
fond hearts of Peggy and her sister had hoped. 

But alas! for their hopes, the fatal battle of Long Island 
sent dismay throughout America. Then came the report 
that " Xeddy" had been killed, and we may imagine how the 
sisters wept together. Later tidings raised their hopes once 
more, for a message was received that he had been captured 
by the British, and was uninjured, though in prison. After 
a little more than three months' captivity he was exchanged, 
and we may be very sure that he received a hearty welcome 



41G TJfe of Margaret Shippen, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

wlicn he arrived in Philadelphia. Hardly 'had the excite- 
ment caused by "Noddy" Bard's return subsided before the 
capture of young Edward Shipper, in the British lines caused 
another season of disquietude. 

These constantly recurring scenes of anxiety and danger 
developed in Peggy Shippen a susceptibility to fuinting- 
spells, to which she was subject whenever perturbation of 
mind reacted upon a delicately organized body, and which 
continued all through her life. Otherwise, Peggy Shippen's 
early life would have been considered an uneventful one. 
We have found no account of her leaving Philadelphia 
prior to her marriage. But this, perhaps, is not to be 
wondered at, when we reflect that travelling in the country 
was accompanied by danger. Even the pleasures of travel- 
ling would be greatly lessened by accidents such as Miss 
Kitty Ewing (afterwards married to General Edward Hand) 
describes in her letter to her aunt, Mrs. Jasper Yeates, viz.: 

"DeakAuxt 

" I bad not longlyt out of the Chaire before I received your accepttable 
favour for you must know that 1 am grown a greate traveller since I 
left Lancaster. Mr. Johnston took us up to Carlile ec whe had a very 
pleasant ride of it. Mr. anders & I whare in one Chaire Fanny & her 
dady in the other, our Chare only overset twiste the first place that 
Mr anders overset in was as even as the flower I now stand on Fanny 
& I whaire obligd to walk the fore miles as that was all whe had to go. 
our Chare was brokall to pcaccss & Mr. Johnstons hors whas forste to. 
carry all all the burden that was in our Chaire. whe took pitty on the 
poor hors & would walk. I entende to write to you aga when I can get 
a better pen for this is so bad I could hardly write." 

Heading matter likely to interest young ladies was limited 
during the revolutionary epoch, for Sarah Shippen says : 

"I can not have the pleasure of sending Miss John-ton any boob 
that she will like, she may read the 1st vol of Ricoboni till we can get 
the 2nd which she shall have immediately as we i.rt.t it she may diver: 
herself with the memoirs of a Lady of Quality which if .-he has never 
read will not he unentertaining. Adieu and that a couple of smart 
Hcaus may drop in to amuse you is the wish of Yours, S. S." 



IJfe of Margaret Sfiippcn^ Wife of Benedict Arnold. 417 

"Who reads Iiiccoboni now ? Is there any one wlio desires 
to peruse his second volume? And we fancy that the 
" Memoirs of a Lady of Quality" arc not of such a nature 
as to be specially recommended for perusal by young ladies 
nowadays. 

As books were scarce, it is not surprising that the beaux 
were in great request, and dull indeed must it have been at 
times, when even so sprightly a maiden as "Becky" Franks 
writes to Miss E. Shippen, "Wliats become of all our Beaux ? 
Fm airraid they've quite deserted this road." 

After the British army evacuated Philadelphia, she wrote 
as follows : 

"Poor Nancy I know how she must have felt. I should have lov'd 
of all things to have seen her she shou'dent have staid up stairs till the 
company assembled had I been with her. I wonder if she looked 
Handsome. I forgot to ask Mr. White, you desire to know when he 
returns I believe that is quite uncertain but a Gentleman (who he is 1 
dont know) goes a Saturday I have wrote to Mrs. Paca by him & if 
you'll write 111 send y'r letters with mine to Mr. White to go with him. 

"Joesy must have looked perfectly Cha'ming in the Character of 
Father. I wish he'd pay us a Vis as I make no doubt he's much im- 
proved l>y being so long in Maryland. Mr White tells me his present 
flame is a Miss Teggy Spear of Baltimore you may remember her she 
lived at Mrs Smith's a pretty little girl enough. What think you of 
the Weather, wont it be a bar to our Hopes? I much fear it will Hi 
Ho I cant hip sighing when I think of it. Oh! the Ball, not a lady 
there the Committee of real Whigs met in the Afternoon & frightened 
the Beaux so much that they went round to all the ladies that meant to 
go to desire they'd stay at home, tho' it seems the Committee had no 
thoughts of molesting being all of their own Kidney. I'm delighted 
that it came to nothing a-* they had the impudence to laugh at ITS." 

VFc have omitted au incident which took even Miss 
Becky aback, and also her complaint about her pen, which 
must have been very bad, for it even affected her spelling; 
and give the conclusion as follows: 

11 1 heard Mr. Imlay say he intends paying you a Vis soon, so look 
out for him th first tine day. when the ro:wls will permit my return 
God knows. I begin to grow Home sick lis very dull such Weather lor I 
hant a soul to speak to except Aunt nor a Hook to read. I'm determined 



418 Life of Margaret Shippen, Wife of Benedict A 



mold 4 



to send to Imlay for one this Afternoon. I bant seen a Beau since the 
day before yesterday where can the Wretches keep. I'm tired, so Adieu. 
love to all frieiuls. write me to Morrow. 

"B. Franks. 
"Union Castle Thursday noon, 
does Moses often pay you a Vis. 

for my part tis so long since I've • • a 

seen (him I) hardly think I 
sho(uld know) him 
"To Miss Ship pen 

"at The Cottage." 

.ITICAL SENTIMENTS AND ENVIRONMENT. 

• 

As it has been asserted (though never proved) that Mar- 
garet Shippen had imbibed from her father sentiments dis- 
loval to America, we deem it advisable to define as well as 
we can Edward Shippen's political sentiments prior to and 
during the eventful period of the Revolution, together with 
some of the circumstances which influenced his conduct. 

Iii the first place, we must remember that he received his 
legal education in England, and the idea of resorting to 
armed resistance to acts of Parliament was repugnant to 
every principle which he had learned. In addition, he. knew 
that, in the grant to William Penn of the Province of Penn- 
sylvania, Charles the Second had expressly reserved the right 
and power to collect the duties and taxes levied by act of 
Parliament. The Charter of Pennsylvania is to be found 
in volume first of the Colonial Records, published by the 
State of Pennsylvania, and some sentences pertinent in this 
connection are as follows, viz. : 

"WEE DOE grant unto the said William Penn, his heirs and assigns 
may . . . forever, have and enjoy the customs and subsidies . . . rea- 
sonably assessed, . . . saveing unto u?, our hcires and successors, Bach 
imposcons and custom es as by act of parliament are and shall be ap- 
pointed." [/ Col. Ita. jrif.] 

. "WEE doe Covenant . . . with the said William I'enn, and his 
heires and assigns, that WEE, ... shall att no time hereafter sett, or 
make, or cause to he sett, any imposieon, custome or other taxaoon, rate 
vt contribution .whatsoever, . . . units the same be with the consent of 



Life of Mar t j are ( Shippeft, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 419 

the pprietary, or ehiefe Governor and Assembly, or by act of parliament 
in England.'" [/</. afiittJ] 

If liis legal training interposed such obstacles to violent 
measures, we must remember that bis position as a member 
of an old and honored family, and as an ofiice-hoklcr who 
had taken an oath of allegiance to George the Third, also 
exercised an influence no less potent over him. 

Such were the reasons (and who shall say they were not 
valid?) which prevented him from countenancing aimed re- 
sistance to the Crown. 

But, on the other hand, he was a native American rejoicing 
in the achievements of the colonists, while he deeply felt 
the hardships of the British rule. The following extracts 
from his correspondence will clearly show this. In a letter 
to his father, of March 13, 1755-56, 1 he says: 

"The New England men are now esteemed the champions of the 
American world." 

In a letter to his father, of September 10, 17G5, he says: 

" You observe by the public papers that great Kiots & Disturbances 
are going forward. in New England in Opposition to the Stamp Act & 
Stamp Oflicers. I think the Act an oppressive one, and I wish any 
Scheme for a Repeal of it could be fallen on ; but I am afraid these 
violent Methods will only tend to fix Chains upon us s-ooner than they 
would otherwise come. There is a general Threat thro' out America of 
destroying the Stump Paper as soon as it shall arrive ; what will bo the 
Consequence of such a Step I tremble to think of. Two Gentlemen in 
Khode Island, whose Houses were pulled down (for maintaining in Argu- 
ment that the Parliament had a right to tax us) are gone home to Eng- 
land to make their Complaint. Poor America! It lias seen its best 
days." 

In another letter, of October 17, 17G5, he says: 

"On the 0th Inst. Peggy presented me with a Son, born just time 
enough to breath about three weeks the Air of Freedom ; for after the 
first of November we may call oursclvi's the Slaves of England. 

"The Lawyers <fc Officers had a Meeting last night to consult on the 
Steps they must tike if no Stamps are to be obtained ; A Variety of 

1 Ship pen Papers, p. 31. 



420 Life of M'.irrjarct Skinpin, Wfe of Benedict Arnold. 

Sentiments at first appeared, but after some Debate it was carried by a 

Majority That tho' we might perhape be justified in America in prac- 
tising in our usual nay without stampt Taper when none is to be ha-:! ; 
Yet if the Parliament of England Should determine to force the Act 
clown our Throats, tliey would immediately set "Prosecutions on foot 
against the principal Civil pincers who had ventured to risque the 
Penalties, in order to strike a Terror into the other Inhabitants ; and in 
that Case they would undoubtedly make Equity & Law give way to 
Policy in their Determinations. And what American Fortune could 
withstand them? So that upon the whole we determined to do no Act 
whatsoever after the first of November in our several Offices to hazard 
the penalties. However we are shortly after that to have another 
Meeting, When we cannot say what the Distresses of the Country may 
oblige us to." 

On April 6, 1766, lie writes: l 

"I am stopt with the joyful news of the Stamp Act being repealed. 
I wish you and all America joy." 

On April 8, 1766, lie writes: . 

"Our Joy on the News of the Stamp Act being repealed is dampt by 
Letters from Virginia giving an A.ccount of the Arrival of a Vessel 
from London in five weeks bringing News that the Stain}) Act will either 
not be repealed, or else on such terms as will be grievous for America." 

On April 16, 1766, he writes to bis brother : 

. "The bad Acc't from Virginia proves not to be true, as the Vessel 
which was said to have brought it left England the 3rd Fcbry. A Vessel 
arrived here the day before yesterday in 31 days from Londonderry. 
She brings Irish News Papers of the 7th March and a London Chrouicle 
of the 25th of February, by which it appears that the Debate was 
opened in the Douse of Commons by Secretary Conway who made a 
warm Speech in favour of the Repeal, he was seconded by one Mr. Burke, 
who it seems made a remarkable shining figure; they were answered by 
Chas. Jenkinson, who acknowledged the Imperfection of the Act, but 
contended it should only be altered not repealed, lie was seconded 
by one who?e aame I forgot ;. Then arose in great Glory our Patron 
Pitt, who with his legs muilled in flannels and resting upon Crutches 
delivered a noble and patriotic Harangue in our favour, he payed great 
Compliments to Mr. Conway and Mr. Burke, inveighed vehemently 

1 Manuscript, Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 



Life of Margaret Skipper*, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 421 

against the Stamp Act, said he had many times wished his Frieudd had 
brought him to the House of Commons in his bed (to which he was then 
confined) that tho' groaning in misery lie might have-born his Testimony 
against so impolitic & grievous an Act. Mr. Pitt was answered by G. 
Greenville who tho' against us and in a bad Cause seems to have given 
Entertainment. There were many other Speakers, but upon the whole 
about 2 in the morning the Question was called for, and on the Division 
there appeared 275 Votes for the Kepcal and 107 against it. The next 
day Bow Church Bells as well as many other Bells in the City shouted 
the whole day & in the Evening many Houses were illuminated." 

Sucli were his sentiments, deploring but not resisting the 
aggressions of the British government. But it is important 
to remember the part taken by his relatives in the Revolution. 

His father was Chairman of the Lancaster County Com- 
mittee of Correspondence and Inspection during the Revo- 
lution, 1 and was always devoted to the cause of liberty, 
though debarred by age (born in 1703) from active service. 

James Burd (who married his sister) was a colonel, com- 
manding a battalion of militia, in the army of the Revo- 
lution. 2 

Tench Francis, brother of Edward Shippcirs wife, was a 
captain in the Philadelphia militia. 3 

Edward JUird, nephew and afterwards son-in-law of Ed- 
ward Shippen, was a major in the American Army, and was 
taken prisoner by the British at the battle of Long Island. 

Dr. "William Shippen, " the elder," a member of Congress 
in 1778 and 1V79, 4 was Edward Shippen's uncle; while his 
first cousin, Dr. William Shippen, " the younger," was from 
1777 to 1781 "Director-General of all the Military Hos- 
pitals for the Armies of the United States.'' 5 

Another first cousin, Thomas Willing, was actively as- 
sociated with Robert Morris in upholding the credit of the 

1 See Pennsylvania Archives, Second Series, Vol. XIII. pp. 270, 281, 
2S6, 2S9, and 201. 
5 Ibid., p. 807. 

* Ibid., pp. 550, 000, and 787. 

4 SeeColoniaf lupoids, Vol. XII. p. 172. 

* See Pennsylvania Archives, Second Series', Vol. XI. p. 807. 



422 Life of Margaret Shippen, Wife of Benedict Arnold, 

United States ; and James Willing, Still another first cousin, 
was a captain of marines [ in the American army until 
taken prisoner and confined in a British prison-ship; and 
still another iirst- cousin, Richard "Willing, was captain in 
the Philadelphia Associators iii the Revolution. 2 

Tench Tilghmau, nephew of Mrs. Edward Shippen, was 
aide-de-camp to General Washington from 1T7G to 1781, 
when he was the messenger sent to announce to Congress 
the surrender of Cornwallis. 

Jasper Yeates (married to Edward Shippen's niece, Sarah 
Burd, December 30, 1767) was a captain in the Lancaster 
militia. 3 * 

Peter Grubh (married to Edward Shippen's niece, Mary 
Shippen Burd, November 28, 1771) was a colonel com- 
manding a battalion of Lancaster County militia in 1776/ 

Under such circumstances, we think that the most exact 
account of Edward Shippen's conduct is to say that he 
intended to, and did as far as possible, preserve a strict 
neutrality between the two contending parties in the revo- 
lutionary struggle. • In a letter to his father, dated March 11, 
1777, 5 he says: 

"In tlie.se times I shall consider a private station as a post of honor, 
and if I cannot raise my fortune as high as my desires, I can bring down 
my desirts to ray fortune." 

If this is correct, a comparison with the views of the 
leading American patriots in the earliest stages of the con- 
test will surprise us by showing what a little difference there 
was between their views at that time and his subsequent, 
conduct. Y\ r c quote the following from page 67 of Sabine's 
"American Loyalists," first edition: 

** All, both Whigs and Tories, were born aud h:id grown up under a 
monarchy; and the attract question of renouncing it or continuing it 
was one on which men of undoubted patriotism di tiered widely. Very 

1 See Pennsylvania Archives, Second Series, Vol. XV. p. 0">S. 

1 Ibid., Vol! XIII. p. 50G. 5 Ibid., p. 336. 

^Ibid., p. 340. * Shippen Papers, p. 257, 



Life of Mar gar d Shippen, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 423 

many of the Whiffs came into the final measure of separating from the 
mother country Avith great reluctance, and doubt and hesitation prevailed 
even in Congress. Besides, the "\VIr'g leaders uniformly denied that 
Independence was embraced in their plans, and constantly affirmed that 
their sole object was to obtain concessions, and to continue the connexion 
with England as hitherto ; and John Adams goes- further than this, for, 
8a-ys he, 'there uas not a moment during the revolution, uhen J would not 
have given everything I possessed for a restoration to the state of things 
before the contest began, provided we could hare had a sufficient security for 
its continuance. 1 " 

If 2vlr. Adams be regarded as expressing the sentiments 
of the Whigs, tltey were willing to remain colonists, provided 
they could have had their rights secured to them; while 
the Tories were contented thu-3 to continue without such 
security. Such, as it appears to me, was the only differ- 
ence between the two parties prior to hostilities, and many 
Whigs, like Mr. Adams, would have been willing to rescind 
the Declaration of Independence, and to forget the past, 
upon proper guarantees for the future. This mode of stating 
the question, and of defining the difference between the two 
parties — down to a certain period at least — cannot be ob- 
jected to, unless the sincerity and truthfulness of some of 
the most eminent men in our history are directly impeached ; 
and if any are prepared to dispute their veracity, it may 
still be asked whether the lories ought not to be excused for 
believing them. What, then, has been said by men whom 
we most justly reverence ? Franklin's testimony, a few days 
before the affair at Lexington, was, that he had " more than 
once travelled almost from otic end of the continent to the 
other, and kept a variety of company, eating, drinking, and 
conversing with them freely, and never had heard in any con- 
versation from, any person } drunk or sober, the least expression of 
a wish for a separation, or a had that such a thing would be 
advantageous to America.'" Mr. Jay is quite as explicit. 
"During the course of my life," said he, u and until the 
second petition of Congress, in 17To, / never did hear an 
American of any class or any description express a wish for the 
Independence of the Colonies:' ki It has always been, and still is 



424 JJft ' • . M ' L 

vtf+ that tmt eoontrv wa»pmif leii 
lence bj: PKrostf/, -and not bf c£- 
Mr. J it, a&twzrd of Xcw York, 

-. . . ?! . . 

pnmOM f hostilities, I know not ; bat Jt/*rr Ibrf 

er beard a whisper of a 
Great Bri 

aington, in I ilhr rarfjii 

'■■"■"■ - : . ' ~ ■ ~ . 

gated .■'... '.''_'- 

u yari id : a/* i&L*V'ju U the America* GJomes 

Mr. ^Madison was sot in 
public II:. 177 

: ~ • ~ 

y,as tktj it en. jgnrkms to ike ecatro- 

lz=\ ': . ' .:..!-:: 

If neb v or : - /intents of tbc leading American 

; I 

neutrality, and not becoming a 
in of r However, bis office as Judge of 

tL -."":..-__". 

: : L : : : T ; : ■ . 

In a pamphlet entitled m Ob- 

set - ; . . . 

"The 1 1 :~jd S.r^eiiaris i iiiwl krre are to be liAicmi in. 

any court or is any coart or" ^tairilty, cr Tice-atonc 

tb. -:'. . .:: r. .: :'_-: :~.:\ :.-.. - :-..:: 

" Tbe i_ tkesc cainMMT, uifilto,, is Ae jrrsdee of Great 

I : .- 

i . :":.: r.:b . ; r :* :_-? : .z -"""-- ...:••- .c -::■_ :. r_ : .- :L_i 

■ - - 

power of Lining its, and exttf*Ixn_r tW ju. :i- Lct>» of unb of : 



IJfc of Mar yard Shippcn, Wfe of JBenvdict Arnold. 4*25 

and vice-admiralty in the colonies to matters arising within the body of 
a county, and directed the numerous penalties and forfeitures thereby 
inflicted to be recovered in the said courts." 

On December 7, 177G, the Council of Safety passed the 
following resolutions: l 

" Resolved, That it is the opinion of this Board, that every person who 
is so void of Honor, virtue and Love of his Country as to refuse his 
assistance at this time of eminent public danger, may justly be suspected 
of designs Inimical to the Freedom of America ; And, Where such 
designs are very apparent from the Conduct of Particular persons, such 
persons ought to be confined during the absence of the Militia, and the 
Officers of this State to have particular regard to the above resolve and 
act accordingly, with vigour, Prudence and discretion, Reserving appeals 
to this Council, or a Committee thereof, where the same is requested." 

In consequence of this or some other order, Edward 
Shippcn must have been compelled to give some parole to 
stay within a certain district, because we find that on August 
15, 1777, 2 the Supreme Executive Council, " On Motion, 
Agreed, That James Hamilton, John Lawrence, Edward 
Shippen, junr," and others, "have the hounds prescribed in 
their respective Paroles enlarged to the whole State of 
Pennsylvania." 

After this lie seems to have lived undisturbed, though a 
great deal of anxiety was caused by an escapade of his son 
Edward, the particulars of which are thus related in a letter 
to his lather, dated January 18, 1777 : 3 

"My son Neddy was sqnt on an errand by his master into Jersey, 
where he' stayed longer than his business required. In order to avoid 
being pressed into the militia service, when CJeneral Howe had advanced 
as far as Trenton, and it was thought he was making his way to Phila- 
delphia, Neddy (aged IS) was prevailed upon by Johnny, (aged SS) 
Andrew, (aged 37) and Billy Allen (agrffd about :!•">) to go in with them 
to the British army, which he accordingly did, and was civilly received 
there by General Howe and the British officers. His companions soon 
after went to New York, and Neddy remained at Trenton. When the 
attack was made on the Medians there, lie was accordingly taken 

1 See Colonial Records, Vol. XI. p. 33.. 

* ibid., p. *j*;o. 

3 Shippen Papers, p. -<")•">. 



426 Life of Margaret Shippm, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

prisoner by our army, and carried, with others, to General Washington, 
who after examining his ca>c, and finding be had taken no commission, 
nor done any act that showed him inimical, very kindly discharged him, 
and he is now with us. Though I highly disapprove of what lie had 
done, yet 1 could not condemn him as ranch pa I should have done, if 
be had not been enticed to it by those who are much older, and ought 
to have judged better than himself." 

Calling Washington's force "our army" in this letter 
eeems to indicate that his feelings were decidedly in favor 
of the success of the Americans. 

One circumstance, showing that the Shippens enjoyed no 
particular favor from the British, is related in a letter dated 
November 1, 1780, from Itichard Peters to < 4 Neddy" Bard, 
as follows : 



"You may remember I spoke to you on the subject of the Repairs 
necessary to be done to Mr. Shippen's Stable. I find these Repairs are 
more considerable than I at first Considered. The whole Roof of the 
Front Stable is every M^oment in Danger as the British cut away the Ties 
which bound the Rafters together. I wish you to view the Stable and let 
something be done." 

It must be borne in mind that no act of disloyalty to 
America has ever been charged against Edward Shippen ; 
but, on the contrary, he was called upon early to assist in 
the administration of public affairs, and was made a judge 
in Pennsylvania in less than eight months after the treaty of 
peace with Great Britain was signed in France. 

From what has been said we feel justified in stating that, 
though Edward Shippen took no part in the revolutionary 
contest, ho was not a Loyalist; but, on the contrary, when 
there was no alternative between abject submission and in- 
dependence, he preferred the success of the Americans. 

And we have the recorded testimony of Thomas McKcan, 
one of the most sterling and uncompromising patriots 
among the signers of the Declaration of Independence, that 
be had " special trust and confidence" in the patriotism ot 
Edward Shippen. 



- 



Life of Margaret Shfppat, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 427 

THE MESCHIANZA. 

The Meschianza was a fete given by the British officers 
in Philadelphia to General Howe upon the occasion of his 
retiring from command. From the accounts which have 
come down to us, it seems to have been the most elaborate 
celebration ever held in America up to "that time. 

It has been stated that Margaret Shippen, as well as her 
sisters, took part in the performance as Ladies of the 
Blended Hose and Burning Mountain; and, as Andre was 
mainly instrumental in getting up the Meschianza, it has 
also been alleged that this fete formed in some way a link 
in a chain of evidence that was to show that Margaret 
Arnold participated in her husband's treason. Though we 
cannot see how this matter can have any weight whatever 
upon the question, yet, for the information of those who 
might think otherwise, we deem it right to call their atten- 
tion to the fact that it has been stated on good authority 
that these ladies did not take the parts attributed to them.. 

In a paper read before the Historical Society of Pennsyl- 
vania on May 5, 1879, it was slated that "Peggy" Shippen 
and her sisters had been "Ivnight's Ladies" at this festival. 
When the paper was published l the following note was 
appended : 

11 In making the statement that the Miss Shippcns were present at the 
Meschianza I followed the accounts written by Major Andre and others. 
Since the paper was read I "have received a letter from Mr. Lawrence 
Lewis, Jr., from which I extract the following, that will be new to those 
interested in the history of that celebration: .'1 would like to communi- 
cate to you a suggestion in reference to one part of your address. You 
stilted that Mrs. Arnold and her two sisters (daughters of Shippen, C. J.), 
were present at the Meschianza. Although all the printed and pub- 
lished accounts of that festivity have made a similar statement, the 
tradition in the Shippen family has always been to the contrary. The 
young ladies had been invited, and had arranged to go ; their names 
were upon the programmer, and their dresses actually prepared, but at 
'the last moment .their father was visited by some of his friends, promt- 

1 Pi:nna. Mag., Vol, 111, p. 866. 



428 L'Jc of Margaret Sktppcn, Wife of Benedict Arnold. 

nent members of the Society of Friend-, who persuaded him that it 
would be by no means seemly that his daughters should appear in 
public in the Turkish dresses designed for the occasion. Consequently, 
although they are said to have been in a dancing jury, they were obliged 
to stay away. This- same story has, I know, come down independently 
through several branches of the family, and was told me repeatedly, the 
last time not more than two years ago, by an old lady of the family, 
who was the niece of Mrs. Arnold and her sisters, aud who has since 
died.' " 

In Keith's " Provincial Councillors of Pennsylvania," 
page 57, it is positively stated that Margaret Shippen and 
her sisters were not present at the Meschianza. 

In further corroboration of this statement, and as explain- 
ing how the report of their presence probably arose, we 
quote the following sentences from an article called " Major 
Andre's Story of the Misehianza," by Sophie Howard Ward, 
published in the Century Magazine for March, 1894. "We 
quote from Vol. XL VII. pages 68-1 and 685 : 



"Mr. Fiske tells us in his History of the American Revolution : 'It 
was a strange medley, combining the modern parade with the mediaeval 
tournament, and was interesting on account of the prominent parts 
having been taken by the ill-starred Major Andre, c^nd the beautiful 
Margaret Shippen, who so soon afterward became the wife of Benedict 
Arnold.' Strangely enough, Mr. Fiske was unaware of the fact that for 
some reason Chief Justice Shippen had forbidden his daughters to 
appear, and that, although their dresses were prepared, they were not 
allowed to be present. . . ." 

"... In this description Andre is careful to omit the names of the 
Shippen girls, leaving a blank before the name of Mr. Sloper, who was 
to ride for Margaret Shippen, and Mr. Winiard, who should have been 
the knight of her sister. This confirms the story, which Mrs. Wharton 
tells us has come down from the Shippen family, that although in a 
'dancing fury,' they were not in the Mischianza. As Andre includes 
them in his only other description until now printed, which appeared 
in the Gentleman's Magazine, August, 1778, we mu.-t accept Mrs. Whar- 
ton's suggestion that, like the modern reporter, Andre sent off his copy 
before the ball had taken place." 

Watson, in his " Annals of Philadelphia/ 1 gives a good 
description of this celebrated fete. 



Life of Margaret &fuppen % Wife of Benedict Arnold. 429 

Apropos to Watson'si account, a curious incident is re- 
lated in Harpers' Magazine for May, I8K>. in an article called 
" Old Philadelphia." It is there stated that a scene in the 
old Southwark Theatre, representing a woodland glnde, was 

painted and signed by Andre; and that upon one occasion 
when a play founded upon Andre's capture was presented, 
the scene which he had painted was set upon the stage to 
represent the place of his capture hy Paulding, Williams, 
and Van "Wart, near Tarrytown. 

(To be continued.) 



I 

430 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Newsmtt. 



LITHOGRAPHIC PORTRAITS OF ALBERT XEWSAM. 

BY J). MCN. BTAUFFER. 

(Concluded from page 289.) 

Andrew Jackson. 
Half-length, full face. W. J. Ilubard, plnxt Childs k 
Inman, lith., Phila. Title — as above. Size 7 x G.12 ins. 

Ibid. 
Rectangular, full length, seated, front face. W. J. Hub- 
ard, pinxt. Childs & Inmany lith., Phila., 1834. Title- 
Andrew Jackson | President of the United States. Size 
19.2 x 13.12 ins. 

Ibid. 
. Rectangular, bust, face f to left, P. S. Duval, lith. Title 
— Andrew Jackson. Size 6.8 x 3.14 ins. 

. ■ Jamison. 



Three-quarter length, standing, face £ to left. From a 
daguerreotype by J. E. Mayall, and published by him, Phila., 
184G. Title— Signature | Jamison as Macbeth | " The 
Prince of Cumberland " | That is a step, etc. Size 12 x 
9.2 ins. 

Thomas Jefferson. 

Oval, in ornamented rectangular frame, full bust, face J to 
left. Published by C. S. Williams, Phila,, 1846. Title— 
Thomas Jeuerson | 3rd President of the United States. 
Sizo 10.4 x 8.15 ins. 

Ibid, 

Re'ctangular, bust, face J to left. P. S. Duval, lith. 
Title— Th. Jefferson. Size 0.8 x 3.14 ins. 



^s 



%k 



i r . .-■ ~ik>*" ' • 
4* :'.■ 

f 3* 












^A 



<?/. 



S 



/ 



r\ 




S 



£ ort t 



~^ r- 




Lithographic Portraits of Albert Newsam. 431 

Fklix Johnson. 
Half-length, front face. .From an ambrotype. P. S. Du- 
val, lith., for Jos. M. Wilson, Phila. Title— Felix Johnson | 
President of the Bethel College, McLcmoresvillc, Tennessee 
| Moderator of the Gei.h Assembly of the Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church, 1858. Size 5.8 x 4.5 ins. 

Richard M; Johnson. 
Half-length, face f- to right. II. Inman, pinxt. Childa k 
Inman, lith., Phila., 1832. Title— Richard M. Johnson | 
of Kentucky. Size 8.12 x 8.S ins. 

John Johnston. 
Half-length, face § to right. From a photograph. P. S. 
Duval, lith., for Jos. M. Wilson, Phila. Titled-John John- 
ston | Pastor of Tullylish Presbyterian Church, Banbridge, 
Ireland | Moderator of the General Assembly of the Pres- 
byterian Church in Ireland, 1858. Size 6.4 x 4.8 ins. 

William F. Johnston. 
Half-length, face | to left. From a daguerreotype by 
England k Gunn, and published by same. P. S. Duval, 
lith., Phila. Title— Signature | William F. Johnston | 
Governor of Penna. Size 10 x 9.2 ins. 

Walter Jones. 
Half-length, face £ to right. Unlettered proof in New- 
sam collection. Size 6.2 x 5.12 ins. 

Fanny Kemlle. 
Head only, nice \ to right. T. Sully, pinxt. Childs & 
Inman, lith., Phila., 1833. Unlettered .proof from Xew^am 
collection. Size 10.5 x 9 ins. 

Miss F. A. Kemule. 

Half-length, front face. ■ Sir Thos. Lawrence, pinxt. 
Childs k Inman and S. M. Stewart, lith., Phila., 1832. Title 
— Miss F. A. Kemble. Size 8.4 x 8 ins. 



432 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Neicsam. 

J. Iyexxaday. 
Half-length, face § to right. A: Xewsain from life ; pub- 
lished by Thos. S. Wagnc* in IT. S. Ecclesiastical Portrait 
Gallery. Title— Bev'd J. Kennaday. Size G.15 x 5.13 ins. 

Joseph II. Kexnard. 

Half-length, front face. A. Xewsam, from life ; pub- 
lished by Thos. S. Wagner in U. S. Ecclesiastical Portrait 
Gallery. Title— Rev. Joseph II. Kennard. Size 0.12 x 
4.15 ins. 

Henry King. 

Full bust, face § to left. P. S. Duval & Son, lith., Phila. 
Title — Truly yours | Henry King. Size 4.5 x 3.G ins. 

William P. King. 

Rectangular, half-length, face J to left, Unlettered proof 
from Xewsam collection. Size 9.2 x 7.14 ins. 

James Kitchen. 
Half-length, face § to right. Title— James Kitchen, M.D. 
| Professor in Clinical Department of the | Pennsylvania 
Homeopathic College. Size 9.4 x 7.4 ins. 

Madame Lafarge. 
Bust, profile to left; bonnet and veil. A. Newsam, del. 
P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. Title— Madame Lafarge. Size 
4.6 x 3.G ins. 

John Lane. 
Half-length, seated to front, face front. P. S. Duval, lith. 
Title — Yours truly | John Lane. Size 10.8 x S.12 ins. 

"W'jlliam D. Lewis. 
Oval, half-length, face J to right. From a daguerreotype 
by Proadbent. P. S. Duval, lith. Title— Win! D. Lewis, 
Esq.- 1 Collector of Customs Philada., lSf>L Size 0.11 x 
7.6 ins. 



Lithographic Portraits of Alba*t Xcirsam. 433 

Margaret Lisle. 
Half-length, full face, cap on bead. From a daguerreo- 
type by J. Mayall. P. S. Duval, litb. Title— as above. 
Size 10 x 7 ins. 

R. R. Little. 
Full bust, face § to right. A. Xewsam, del. P. S. Duval, 
litb. Title — as above. Size 4.3 x 3.7 ins. 

John C. .Lowber. 
Half-length, face J to left. J. Wood, pinxt. Lehman & 
Duval, lith., Pbila. Title — Jno. C. Lowber. Size 6.3 x 
5.4 ins. 

Charles Lyell. 
Half-length, full face. From a daguerreotype by. J. E. 
Mayall, and publisbed by tbe same, Pbila., 1846.- Title — 
Cbarles Lyell, Esq., F.R.S., F.G.S. Size 12.8 x 11.9 ins. 

John McDowell. 
Half-lengtb, seated, right band on book, face front. A. 
Newsam, del. P. S. Duval, litb. Tbos. S. Wagner's U. S. 
Ecclesiastical Portrait Gallery, Pbila., 1841. Title— Rev'd 
Jobn McDowell, D.D. Size 7.8 x 8.2 ins. 

Ibid. 
Rectangular, balf-lengtb, face } to rigbt. A. Xewsam, 
del. P. S. Duval, lith." for G. F. Gordon, Editor of The 
Christian, Pbila. Title—Rev. Jobn McDowell, D.D. | 
Pastor of tbe Spring Garden Presbyterian. Church | Pliilada. 
Size 5.6 x 4.7 ins. 

ClIARLLS MclLVAlNE. 

Rectangular, half-length, in robes, front face. II. Inman, 
pinxt. Lehman k Duval, litb., Pbila. Title— The Rigbt 
Reverend diaries Mellvaine, P.D. | Bishop of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church | in the Diocese of Ohio. Size 10.13 
x 8.12 ins. 

vol. xxiv. — 23 



• 



434 Lithographic Portraits of Albert X&rsam. 

Donald C. McLaren. 
Half-length, front fate. From a daguerreotype. P. S. 
Duval, for Jos. M, "Wilson, Phila. ' Title— Donald C. 
McLaren | Moderator of tlie Associate Reformed Presby- 
terian Church, 1S58. Size 5.14 x 4.1 ins. 



John McLean. 
Half-length, face f to right, T. Sully, pinxt, Childs ft 
Inman, lith., for Benjamin Matthias, Phila., 1882. Title- 
John McLean | of Ohio. Size 8.13 x 8.10 ins. 

William Macluke. 
Rectangular, half-length, right hand to head, face f to 
right. Thos. Sully, pinxt. P^S. Duval, lith., Phila! Title 
—Win. Maclure | ./Etat GO. Size 4.7 x 3.13 ins. 

James Madison. 
Oval, in ornamented rectangular frame, bust, face j to 
right. Published by C. S. Williams for his " Portraits of 
the Presidents," Phila., 184G. Title— James Madison | 4th 
President of the United States. Size 10. G x 9 ins. 

Ibid. 
Rectangular, bust, face f to right. P. S. Duval, lith. 
Title— James Madison.. Size G.8 x 3.14 ins. 

John X. Mapfitt. 
Full bust, face J to left. From miniature by P. Well- 
more. Title — Rev'd John X. Matlitt. Not signed by Xew- 
sam, but ascribed to "him. Size 5.8 x 5.4 ins. 

Dost Mahomed. 
Half-length, profile to left. Gen. Harlan, del. P. S. Du- 
val, lith., Phila. Title— -Ex Ameer Dost Mahomed. Size 
5.7 x 3.G ins. 






Lithographic Portraits of Albert Xewsam. 435 

Madame Malilrax. 
Three-quarter length, seated, right hand to face, face front. 
Published by Fiot, Meignen & Co?, Phila. Title—The late | 
Madame Malibran de Beriot. Size 7.10 x G.12 ins. 

Joseph Makkle. 
Rectangular, ornamental frame, with residence in base; 
three-quarter length, sword in left hand, face f to left. Pub- 
lished by J. W. Siddall, Phila., 1844. Title—Joseph Mar- 
kle | Democratic Whig Principles | signature. Size 17.3 
x 14.1 ins. 

John Markoe. 
Half-length, face | to right. On stone by A. IsTewsam ; 
Lehman & Duval, lith., Philadelphia. Unlettered example, 
but identified by a photograph of this lithograph in the 
Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Size 6 x 5.2 ins. 

John Marshall. 
Full bust, front face. H. Inman, pinxt. Childs & In- 
man, lith., Phila., 1831. Title— J. Marshall | Prom the 
original portrait painted by' order of the Bar of Philadel- 
phia. Size 12.5 x 10.2 ins. 

Theobald Matthew. 
Rectangular, full length, face f to left. Title—The 
very Pev'd. Theobald Matthew | Administering the Temper- 
ance Pledge | etc. Size 12.11 x 9.11 ins. 

J. Gordon Maxwell. 
Half-length, in robes, face J to left. A. Xewsam, del. T. 
S. Wagner, lith., Phila. Title— J. Gordon Maxwell (signa- 
ture) | Kev'd J. Gordon Maxwell I Rector of the Emanuel 
Episcopal Chur-ch | Kensington, Philadelphia. Size 10.4 x 
10.5 ins. 



436 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Nacsam. 

Robert Camphkll Maywood. 
Half-length, face f to right. T. Sully, pinxt. P. S. 
Duval, lith., Phila. Title— Rob. Campbell May wood | as 
Tarn O'Shantcr. Size 9.9 x 9 ins. 

Thomas Mellon. 
Half-length, cane in left hand, face -f to left. P. S. Du- 
val, lith., Phila. Title — Signature as above. Size 10.1 x 
8.13 ins. 

Santiago Mendez de Vigo. 
Half-length, in uniform, face front. A. IT. Wallace, pinxt. 
P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. Title— El Exmo So* D w Santiago 
Mendez de Vigo | Gobernador Cap* General de la Ysla 
de | Puerto Pico. Size 8.4 x 7.8 ins. 

James Monroe. 
' Rectangular, bust, face £ to left. P. S. Duval, iith. 
Title — as above. Size 6.8 x 3.14 ins. 

P. E. MORIARTY. 

Half-length, in robes, front face. A. ISTewsam, del., P. S. 
Duval, lith., Phila. Title— Very Rev'd P. E. Moriarty, 
D.D. | Pastor of St. Augustine's Church, Phila. Size 6.4 
x 6 ins. 

Ibid. 
Half-length, in robes, face } to right. A. l^cwsam, from 
life. Title— Very Ecv'd P. E. Moriarty, D.D. | Pastor of 
St. Augustine's Church, Philadelphia. Size 9.8 x 10 ins. 

Edward Joy Morris. 
Oval, half-length, face I to right. From a photograph. 
P. S. Duval, lith.; printed with a tint. . Title— Edward Joy 
Morris | with 4 lines from his Speech in Congress against 
Leconipton Swindle. Size 7.15 x 6.1 ins. 



Lithographic. Portraits of Albert Newsam. 437 

NaROLFOX BoXA PASTE. 

Oval in rectangle, bust, face f to right. P. S. Duval, 
lit))., Phila. Title— iS T . | Post Mortem | St. Helena, May 5, 
1821. Size 8.11 x 7.8 ins. 

Henry Xlill. 
Half-length, full face. From a daguerreotype by Tv". k 
F. Langenhcim. P. S. Duval, lith. Title — as above. Size 
11.2 x 7.14 ins. 

Richard Xewtcn, 

Half-length, in robes, hands on open book in front, face 
| to left. From a daguerreotype by McClcfis & Gcrmon. 
P. S. Duval, lith.', for H. E. Howard, Phila., 1850. Title— 
Yrs. affectionately | Pich'd Newton (signature) | Rcv'd 
Richard Xewton,D.D. | Hector of St. Ifcid Church, Pbilada. 
Size 13.2 x 10.4 ins. 

Pagaxini. 

Full bust, face f to right. Published in The Parlour 
Review, No. 3. Title — as above. Size 4.12 x 4.4 ins. 

James Page. 
Half-length, face f to right. H. Inman, pinxt C. G. 
Childs " direx on stone." Xot signed by Newsam. Un- 
lettered proof. Size 4.4 x 4.8 ins. 

Ibid. (?) 
• Full length, in uniform, face J to left; to right a private, 
full length, face front; in background, three privates, tents, 
etc. A. Newsam, "from life on stone.*' P. S. Duval, lith., 
Phila. Title — cut oft", if there was one. Size 9.4 x 9 ins. (?) 

Ely Parry. 
Full bust, face to left. Lith. of P. S. Duval & Son, Phila. 
Ambrotyped by Gutekunst & Brother. Title — (Signature) 
Ely Parry, M.D.. D.D.S., Prof r of Chemistry, Mat Med. & 
Therapeutics Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery. Size 
9x7 ins. 



438 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Xewsam. 

Mme. Pasta. 

Half-length, with harp, face J to left. Published in The 
Parlour Review, Xo. 5, Geo. Carstensen, Editor. Title — 
as above. Size 5.10 x 4.14 ins. 

Pedro I. 
Full bust, in gorgeous uniform and many decorations, face 
|- to right. Childs & Inuian, lith., for S. M. Stewart. Title 
— D. Pedro I | Emperador do Brazil. Size 10.G x 8.8 ins. 

Empress or Brazil. 
Full bust, to left, face front. Childs & luman, lith., Phila., 
for S. M. Stewart, Chestnut St., Phila. Title— Amelia | 
Imperatriz do Brazil. Size 10.2 x 8 ins. 

Jojix Pembeutox. 
Half-length, front face, with glasses. P. S. Duval, lith., 
Phila. Title — as above. Size 8 x 6.14 ins. 

David Pepper. 
Half-length, face J to right. John Xeagle, pinxt. Leh- 
man & Duval, lith., Phila. Unlettered proof from Xewsam 
Collection. Size 5.1.0 x 5.C ins. 

Philip Syxg Physick. 
Half-length, face § to right. II. Inman, pinxt. Childs 
& Inman, lith., Phila., Dec, 1831. Title— Philip x Syng 
Physick, M.D. Size 7.S x G.4 ins. 

Ibid. 
Half-length, to right, face J to right. Inman, pinxt. P. 
S. Duval, lith., Phila. Title— Philip Syng Physick, M.D. | 
signature. Size 5.9 x 4.2 ins. 

A. L. Pickering. 

Full bust, face £ to right, civilian dress. On stone by 
A. Xewsam. Painted by Parker. P. S. Duval, lith., Xo. 7 
Bank Alley, Phila. Title — as above. Size (of figure only) 
9.1-1 x 8.8 ins. 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert Newsdm. 439 

George Pojntdexteu. 
Rectangular, three-quarter length, seated, to right, face J 
to right. C. P. King, pinxt. Lehman & Duval, lith., Phila. 
Title — Geo. Pointdexter. Size 11.13 x 9.7 ins. 

James Pollock. 
Half-length, front face. P. S. Duval & Co., lith., for 
Martin E. Harmstead, 116 Chestnut St., Phila. Title— 
Yours Truly | Jas. Pollock (signature) | James Pollock. 
Size— 9 x G.12 in?. 

David 11. Pouter. 
Full "bust, front face. John F. Francis, pinxt. P. S. 
Duval, lith., for Jno. F. Francis, Phila., 1838. Title— David 
R. Porter (signature) | Gen'l David P. Porter. Size 9.2 x 
8.12 ins. 

Ibid. 

Full length, in uniform, on horseback, moving to left, 
face f- to right. Horse and landscape by A. Koellner; uni- 
form sketched by Iluddy, portrait by Xewsam. Huddy & 
Duval, publishers, Phila., 1811. Title— David R. Porter 
(signature) | Gen'l David P. Porter | Governor of Penn- 
sylvania^ Size 9.10 x 9 ins. 

Porter, U. S. Senate. 



Rectangular, half-length, front face. S. S. Osgood, pinxt. 
Childs & Lehman, lith., Phila. Unlettered proof from 
Newsam collection. Size 9.G x 7.14 ins. 

D. Powell. 
Half-length, full face. P. S. Duval, -lith. Title— Signa- 
tures as above, one written with the right, and the other 
with the left. hand. Size 4.1-1 x 3.14 ins. 

Tyrone Powers. 
Rectangular, half-length, with hat and cane in right hand, 
face I to left. Unlettered proof in Xewsatn collection. 
Size 10.8 x 8.14 ins. 



440 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Newsam. 

John T. Fjiksslt. 

Half-length, front face. From photograph by Geo. W. 
Taylor. P. S. Duval, lith., for Jos, M. Wilson. Title- 
John T. Pressly | Pastor of the First United Presbyterian 

Church, Allegheny City. Pa. | Moderator of the United 
Presbyterian Synod 1858. Size 6.12 x 4.8 ids. 



"William C. Preston, 
Rectangular, half-length, front face. S. S. Osgood, pinxt. 
Childs & Lehman, lith., Phila. Title— Wm. C. Preston. 
Size 9.8 x 7.11 ins. 

Patrick Rafferty. 
Three-quarter length, seated to left, face f to left; tinted 
background. From a photograph by Willard. Title — 
Yours truly | Patrick Rafferty | Pastor of St. Francis Xavier 
Church | and President of the Literary Institute | Fair- 
mount, Philadelphia | Published by the Institute. Size 11 
x 9.8 ins. 

"William Rawle. 
Full bust, front face. H. Inman, pinxt. Childs & Inman, 
lith., Phila., 1832. Title— W. Rawle | From the Original 
Portrait. Painted by order of the Ear of Philadelphia. 
Size 10 x 8.8 ins. 

Charles II. Head. 
Half-length, face slightly to right. From a daguerreo- 
type. P. S. Duval, lith., for Jos. M. Wilson, Phila. ^Title— 
Chas. II. Pead | Pastor of the United Presbyterian Church, 
Richmond, Va. | Moderator of the United Synod, ISoS. 
Size 6.2 x 4.7 ins. 

JPhilip Ricketts. 
Half-length, face J to right. G. Freeman, pinxt. P. S. 
Duval, lith., Phila. Title — as above. Size 5.12 x G.13 ins. 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert Netcsam. 441 

Joseph JIttner. 
Rectangular, full-length, standing with, right hand on 
plow and in his shirt sleeves, front face. J. F. Francis, 
pinxt. P. S. Duval, litii., for J. F. Francis, Phila., 1838. 
Title — Joseph Ritner | Governor of the State of Pennsyl- 
vania. Size 14.15 x 12.4 ins. 

Ibid. 
Full bust, face f to left. A. T. Lee, pinxt. Lehman & 
Duval, lith., Phila. Title — Joseph Ritner | Governor of 
Pennsylvania. Size 8.8 x 8.6 ins. 

Charles Roberts. 

Full bust, front face. From a daguerreotype by R. Cor- 

naro. P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. Title — as above. Size 

10.12 x 7.14 ins. 

Joseph Roberts. 

Rectangular, half-length, seated, with bead resting on left 
hand, face f to right. M. J. do Francia, pinxt. Lehman 
& Duval, lith. Title — Jos. Roberts | Late Actuary of the 
Penn. Company for Insurance on Lives and Granting Annu- 
ities | Born Marcb 22nd 1793, Died A,ig. 25th, 1835. Size 

12.13 x 14.5 ins. 

Solomon "\\ r . Roberts. 
Full bust, face j to right. M. J. de Francia, pinxt. 
Lehman & Duval, lith., Phila. Unlettered proof. Size 8.2 
x 7.8 ins. 

M. B. Roche. 

Half-length, in robes, face J to right. B. Otis, pinxt. 
Childs & Inman, lith., Phila., 1831. Unsigned by Ncwsam. 
Title— Rev'd M. B. Roche. Size 6.9 x G.12 ins/ 

Thomas Say. 
Half-length, front face. Title— Thomas Say | One of the 
founders of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Phila* | 
Born in Philadelphia, July 27th, 1787. Died at New Har- 
mony, Oct. 10th, 1S37. Size 7.5 x 6.12 ins. 



442 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Ncwsanu 

Rorert II. Sayre. 
Full bust, face f to left. From" an ambrotype by IT. P. 
Osborn. P. S. Duval k Son, litli., Phila. Title— Yours 
Respectfully | Robt. II. Sayre | Supt. & Eng. Lehigh Valley 
Rail Road. Size 5.13 x 4.11 ins. 

Lewis de Schweinitz. 
Full bust, face £ to left. A. Newsam, del. Lehman & 
Duval, lith., Phila. Title — signature as above. Size 3.1 x. 
2.13 ins. 

John R. Scott. 

Half-length, race *§ to right. T. Sully, pinxt. P. S. 
Duval, lith., Phila. Title— Jno. R. Scott | as | St. Pierre. 
Size 10.7 x 9.6 ins. 

W. A. Scott. 

Half-length, face ( to left. P. S. Duval, lith., for Jos. M. 
Wilson. Title— W. A. Scott | Pastor of Calvary Presby- 
terian Church, San Francisco, Cal\ | Moderator of the Gen- 
eral Assembly, 1858. Size G.12 x 5.8 ins. 

Joiix Sergeant. 
■ Half-length, face f to right. Ohilds & Inman, lith., Phila. 
Kot signed by Xewsam, but ascribed to him. Title — as 
above. Size 4.2 x 3.14 ins. 

Francis R. Shunk. 
Full bust, face I to right, Thos. Sully, pinxt., Pittsburg, 
1844. Published by a Committee of his friends in the 
City and County of Phila. Title — signature as above. Size 
10.12 x 10.G ins. 

Adeee Sigoigne. 

Rectangular, three-quarter length, seated to right, face J 
to left. Lehman & Duval, litiu, Philau Title— The Misses 
Delia Costa, as a mark of gratitude to | Miss Adele Sigoignc 
| present her with this portrait taken from one painted 
by M. Riboni, in the possession of Dr. Le Roche. Size 
12.9 x 10.3 ins. 



Lithographic Portraits of A Her i Navscm. 443 

J. S. Silsbee 
Half-length, seated to right, front face. From a daguerreo- 
type. P. S. Duval, litli., Phila. Title — Signature as above. 
Size 9.8x9.4 ins. 

Ibid. 
Full length to front, eap in left hand, face § to right. 
P. S. Duval, litli. Title— J. S. Silsbee j in the character of | 
Sam Slick, the Clockmakcr. Size 12 x 8.6 ins. 



Thomas IT. Skinner. 
Half-length, front face. T. Sully, pinxt. Childs & Inman, 
lith., Phila. Not signed by Newsam. Title — -Rev. Thos. 
II. Skinner. Size 8.8 x 7.14 ins. 

Jonathan Smith. 
Full bust, face f to left. Unlettered proof from Newsam 
Collection. Title — Jon'a Smith, signature. Size 9.14 x 
7.8 ins. 

Jaeed Sparks. 
Half-length, face £ to left. T. Sully, pinxt, From Childs 
& Inman Press. Xot, signed by Xewsam, but ascribed to 
him. Unlettered proof. Size 7.8 x 5.8 ins. 

Charles Stewart. 

Half-length, face £ to left. A. Xcwsam from life. P. S. 

Duval, lith. Title — Signature | Commodore Ch's Stewart | 

below is a view of the " Capture of II. M. Ships Cyauc & 

Levant by U. S. Frigate Constitution." Size 13 x S.14 ins. 

Dugald Stewart. 
.Rectangular* three-quarter length seated to front, face J 
to left. ' Sir II. Racburn, pinxt. C. G. Childs, lith., Phila., 
Sept. 1, 1830. Title— Dugald Stewart | Drawn from the 
original picture presented by Dr. Tidyman to the Penna. 
Academy of the Fine Arts. Si/.e 12 x 0.10 ins. 



444 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Ncwsam. 

William Strickland. 

Half-length, face § to right. J. Neagle, pinxt. C. G. 
Child?, dircx., Phila. Xot signed hy Xewsam. Title — 
William Strickland, Esq. | Architect. Size 4.12 x 5 ins. 

Samuel A. Talcott. 
Half-length, nice f to right. C. G. Chikls, direx., Phila. 
Title — Samuel A. Talcott, Esq. | Attorney General of New 
York. Size 3.10 x 4 ins. 

Maurice de Tallayraxd. 
Bust, front face. JollVoy, del. Chikls k Inman, lith., 
Phila. Title — as above. Size 4.15 x 4.8 ins. 

Talma. 

Full bust, with furs and cap on head, lace f to left. P. S. 
Duval, lith., for The Parlour Review, Phila. Title— as 
above. Size G x 5.11 ins. 

David Thomas. 
Half-length, full nice. A Xewsam, del. P. S. Duval k 
Son, lith., Phila. Title— Yours truly | David Thomas. 
Size 4.5 x 4 ins. 

M. L. P. Thompson.. 
Half-length, face £ to left. From a photograph. P. S. 
Duval, lith., for Jos. M. Wilson, Phila. Title— M. L. P. 
Thompson | Pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, 
Buffalo, New York | Moderator of the General Assembly, 
1858. Size 6x5 ins. 

Ibid. 
Half-length, face J to right. From an ambrotype. P. S. 
Duval, lith., for Jos. M. Wilson, Phila. Title— same as 
above. Size G.4 x 4.15 ins. 

Samuel Thompson. 
Full bust, face J to left. Thos. Sully, pinxt. P. S. Duval, 
lith. Title— as above. Size 5.4 x 4.11 ins. 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert Ncwsam. 445 

James Thorn e. 
Half-length, right Lund holding purse to car, face front. 
Joseph Bushc, pinxt. P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. Title- 
James Thome | as Figaro | in the Barber of Seville. Size 
9 x 11.8 ins. 

John Tyler. 

Rectangular, face f to right. P. S. Duval, lith., for Dan 1 
Richardson. Title — as above. Size 6.8 x 3.14 ins. 

Stephen H. Tvxg. 
Half-length, in robe3, face } to left. Thos. Wagner, lith., 
Phila., 1841. Title— Rev d Stephen II. Tyng, D.D. | U. S. 
Ecclesiastical Gallery | Published by Thos. S. Wagner, Phila. 
Size 7.4 x 6.10 ins. 

Martin Van Buren. 
Rectangular, bust, face f to right. P. S. Duval, lith. 
Title— M. Van Buren. Size 6.8 x 3.14 ins. 

Roberts Yaux. 

JIalf-length, face J to left. II. Inman, X. A., pinxt. 
Childs & Lmian, lith., Phila. Title— Roberts Yaux | Drown 
on stone by Albert Newsam, one of the first mutes | edu- 
cated in the Penria* Institution for the Deaf and Dumb. 
Size 4.14 x 5.2 ins. 

Ibid. 

ITalf-'length, face { to left. Henry Inman, pinxt, P. S. 
Duval, lith. Title — I am with groat truth | thy aflcctionate 
friend | Roberts Yaux. Size 5.2 x 4.1$ ins. 

Mr. AVago.aman. 
Rectangular, half-length, face J to left. . S. S. Osgood, 
pinxt, ' Childs & Lehman, lith. Unlettered proof in New- 
eam collection. This is probably George A. Wnggamann, 
U. S. Senator from Louisiana in 1831-35.. Size 9.2 x 
7.11 ins. 



446 lithographic Portraits of Albert Xciosma. 

J AMES WILLIAM WALLACK. 

Full bust, face f to right. Published in Burton's Gentle- 
man's Magazine, Pink. Title— J. W. Wallaek. Size 4.14 x 
4.4 his. 

Reuben IL Walworth. 

Half-length, face f to right. Rem. Peale, pinxt. P. S. 
Duval, lith., -Phila., 1842. Title—Reuben IL Walworth | 

Chancellor of the State of New York. Size 11.8 x 10 ins. 

Robert Walsh, Jr. 
Full bust, left hand to head, face § to left. T. "Sully, 
pinxt. C. G. Cliilds, direx. Not signed. by ISewsam. Title 
— R. Walsh, Jr. | Philad*. Published by C. G. Childs, 80 
Walnut St. Size 3.12 x 4.14 ins. 

Thomas XL Walter. 
Half-length, seated, drawing-scale in hand, face | to right, 
John Neagle, pinxt. Lehman & Duval, lith., Phila., 1836. 
Unlettered proof, given to the compiler by Mr. Walter. 
Size 6 x 5.4 ins. 

Thomas Wardrope. 
Half-length, front face. From an ambrotype. P. S. Duval, 
lith., for Jos. M. Wilson, Phila. Title— Thomas Ward- 
rope | Pastor of the Knox Presbyterian Church, Ottawa, 
Canada West | Moderator of the Presbyterian Church of 
Canada, 1858. Size 6.10 x 4.8 ins. 

George Washington. 
Rectangular, full bust, face j to left. Stuart, pinxt. 
Childs & Inman, Phila., and Peabody & Co., New York, 
lith. Title— Washington. . Size 6.1 x 5.1 ins. 

Tin i). 
Rectangular, bust, face J to left. Stuart, pinxt. P. S. 
Duval, lith. Title— G. Washington. Size G.S x 3.14 ins. 



Lithographic Portraits 'of Albert Newsam. 447 

Ibii>. 
Bust, profile to right. From Iloudon's bust by A. New- 
Barn. P. S. Duval, litli., Phila. On title-page of "Tomb 
of "Washington at Mount Vernon." Phila., Carey k Hart, 
1840. Size 3.9 x 2.7 ins. 

John G. Watmough. 

Ilalf-lcngtli, seated to front, face f to left. Painted by 
Ilenry Inman, N.A. k P.A. ; " Drawan" on stone by A. 
Newsam, a Deaf & Dumb pupil of C. G. Childs. Pub- 
lished for the Proprietors by C. G. Childs, Walnut Street, 
Philadelphia, 1831. Title— Signature Jn'o G. Watmough. 
Size 12.5 x 12.4 ins. 

Thomas "Webb. 
Three-quarter length, in uniform, right hand on breast, 
left on Dible; sword on table, face nearly profile to left, 
patch over right eye. P. S. Duval & Sons, lith., Phila. 
A. Newsam on stone. Title — Captain Thomas Webb | who 
introduced Methodism | into Pennsylvania, Delaware and 
New Jersey. Size 3.8 x 3 ins. 

Francis C. Wemyss. 
Half-length, face | to right. T. Sully, pinixt. Lehman 
& Duval, lith., Phila. Title— Francis C. Wemyss | Mana- 
ger of the American Theatres | Philadelphia & Pittsburg, 
Pa. Size 7.12 x G.14 ins. 

Robert M. Wharton. 
Full bust, face f to left. C. G. Childs, lith. Not signed 
by Newsam. Unlettered proof. Size 4.G x 4.8 ins. 

Daniel Wiikkbeu. 
• Full bust, profde to left. P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. 
Title— Dan'l Wheeler. Size 4.2 x 3.8 ins. 



448 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Newsam. 

Josiah WniTB. 

Half-length, face J to loft. P. S. Duval k Sons, lith., 
Phila. Title— Thy friend | Josiah White. Size 4.10 x 4.8 
ins. 

J. D. AVhite. 

Half-length, face | to left. From a daguerreotype by 
McClees & Germon. P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. Title— Sig- 
nature | J. D. White, M.D., D.D.S. | Professor of Anatomy 
and Physiology in Philadelphia College of Dental Surgery | 
Dr. W. W. Pouch e | C. C. Williams | J. EL M'Quillin | 
to Dr. J. D. White. Size 9.4 x 7.8 ins. 

William White. 

Full-length silhouette, with cane in hand and hat on 
head, profile to right. P. S. Duval, lith., for Thomas Latimer, 
Phila., 1838. Title— R< Rev d William White, D.D. Size 
10 x 7.12 ins. 

Ibid. 

Full bust, in robe3, face | to right. A. IsTcwsam, del. 
P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. Title— 11* Pev J William White, 
D.D. | First President of the Penn. Institution for the Deaf 
& Dumb. | Drawn on stone by | Albert Isewsarn | Late 
Pupil of the Inst n . Size 4.10 x 4.3 ins. 

George Willig. 
Half-length, seated, with cane, face | to right, P. S. 
Duval, lith., Phila. Title— George Willig. (Print cut 
down.) Size about 11.12 x 10.14 ins. 

John G. Wilson. 
Half-length, face f to left. P. S. Duval, lith. Title- 
John G. Wilson, V.D.M. | Age 32. Size G.12 x 5.5 ins. 

William Wilt. 
Full bust, lace \ to right. A. Dickinson, pinxt. Childs 
& Inman, lith., Phila. Title — aa above. Size 7.14 x 6.8 ins. 



Lithographic Portraits of Albert Ncxcsam. 449 

William R dr Witt. 
Half-length, seated to left, front face. J. F, Francis, 
pinxt. Published for Sunday School Teachers of Preshy. 
Ob., Harrisburg, Pa. Title— William K. dc Witt, D.D. 
Size 9.6 x 9 ins. 

Geojrge Wolf. 

Full bust, front face. A, B. Pockey, pinxt. Childs & 
Inraan, lith., Phila., 1833. Title— George Wolf | Governor 
of Pennsylvania. Size 10.8 x 8 ins. 

Ibid. 
Half-length, full face. On a sheet of music. Title — 
George Wolf, Esq., etc. Size 6.4 x 5.2 ins. 

Joseph Wolff. 
Full bust, face f to left. Lehman k Duval, lith., Phila., 
1837. Title— Pev. Joseph Wolff | Missionary | to Pales- 
tine, Armenia, Persia, Khorassaun, Taerkestaun, Bokkara, 
Balkh, Himmalayah Mountains | Cashmear, Hindostaun, 
Abyssinia, Yemen, etc. Size 7.4 x 7.8 ins. 

Mrs. Wood. 
Bust, cap on head, face f to left. Xeagle, pinxt. Leh- 
man & Duval, lith., Phila. Title— Mrs. Wood as Amina | 
in the Opera | La Sonnambula. Size 9.S x 10 ins. 



Andrew Giffokd Wvlie. 
Half-length, face front. From an ambrotype. P. S. 
Duval, lith., for Jos. M. Wilson. Title — Andrew Gilford 
Wylie | Pastor of the Reformed Presbyterian Church, 
Duanesburg, Xew York | Moderator of the Gen. Synod of 
the Reformed Presbyterian Church in X. America, 1858. 
Size 5.15 x 4.7 ins. 

John Young. 
Full bust, face j to left. A. Newsam, del. P. S. Duval 
k Co., lith. Title — Yours sincerely | John Young (signa- 
ture) | John Young. Size 5.G x 3.10 ins. 
vol. xxiv. — 29 



450 Lithographic Portraits of Albert Ncicsam. 

\ 
Ibid. 

. Full bust, face I to right. Gilbert Stuart, pinxt P. S. 
Duval k Co., lith., Pliila. Title — Judge Young | when a 
young man | Prom a painting by Gilbert Stuart. Size 
5.8 x 3.12 ins. 

Some Miscellaneous Lithographs m Xewsam. 

Pennsylvania Institution for the Deaf and Dumb | Drawn 
on stone by Albert Xewsam, a former pupil of the Institu- 
tion. From a daguerreotype by Collins. Size 7.1 x 4.1 ins. 

Frigate Constitution | Bearing the Pennant of Commo- 
dore Jesse Duncan Elliott | Malta, February, 1838. From 
a painting by J. Evans; published in the U. S. Military 

Magazine, Phila. Size 7.7 x 10.3 ins. 

... i 

Banner of the "Repeal Association.'* 5 Published by John 

Kennedy, Xew York, 1842. Size 12.4 x 8.14 ins. 

" The Chinese Collection," in the Chinese Museum, 9th 

and George Sts., Phila. A large colored lithograph, with a 

Chinese scene at top and four others in ovals in the 

ornamented, border. P. S. Duval, lith., Phila. Size of 

whole card 20.6 x 14.8 ins. 



TnE "White Plume. 
Woman with plumed hat, f length, face nearly profile to 
right. C. G. Childs, lith., Phila,' Title— as above. Size 
10.8 x 8.8 ins. 

\ 

Manner of Holding the Guitar. 

Rectangular, a man seated, full length, holding a guitar. 
P. S. Duval, lith. Title— as above. Size 8.11 x 6.6 ins. 

"William Norms Loco. "Works. 

Yie\v of a locomotive. Title — as above. Size S x 
5.3 ins. 



^Lithographic Portraits of Albert Ncwsdm. 451 

Tomi; of "Washington at Mount: Vernon. 
View of tomb. W, Strickland, del. P. S. Duval, lith. 
Title — as above. Size 7 x 4.5 ins. 

" The Sarcophagus, Top view." Size 7.7 x 3.7 ins. 
" Side view." Size 8 x 2.7 ins. 

Clarisse IIarlowe. 
Title to sheet music. P. S. Duval, lith. Figure size 
6.12 x 6.6 ins. 

Blue Eyes. 

Title to sheet music. Female figure. P. S. Duval, lr.h. 
Title— A Mine. Sabatier | Blue Eyes | (Les Yeux Bleus) etc. 
Figure size 5.10 x 6.2. 

■ 

AlLEEN MaVOURNEEN. 

Title to sheet music. Female iigure. Published by A. 
Fiot, Phila. Figure size 5.4 x 5.14 ins. 

Rose Atiierton. 
Title to sheet music. Published by E. Ferrett & Co., 
Phila. Figure size 7.13 x 7.7 ins. 



Julien\s Chimes Quadrille. 
Title to sheet music. Published by E. Ferrett, Phila. 
Size 5.8 x 9 ins. 

Mr. F. E. Marshall, of Philadelphia, has kindly supplied 
the missing title on the I\. M. Bird lithograph, as follows: 

Robert M. Bird. 
" On stone by A. Xewsam. | From a daguerreotype by 
A. M. Root. | P. S. Duval & Co., steam lith. press, Phil. | 
Robert M. Bird (autograph)." 

Mr. AVendell P. Garrison, of Orange, X. .J., gives the 
following description of a Xowsam lithographic portrait oi" 
his father : 



452 LithcK{rapldc Portraits of Albert Newsam, 

William Lloyd G arr esos. 
Vignette, full bust, face slightly turned to right. From a 
daguerreotype by 1\ B. Shew. On stone by Albert Xew- 
sam, P. S. Duval, lith. Title — Win. Lloyd Garrison (auto- 
graph). Size 7 x 4.8 ins. 

Archbishops of Baltimore. 

A large colored lithograph" containing the portraits of — 

Title— The Most Rev: John Carroll, 1st Archbishop of 
Baltimore. Born in Maryland 1735 consecrated on the 
15th of August 1790. died on the 3d Dec. 1815. ' 

Title—The Most Rev: Leonard Xeale 2d Archbishop of 
Baltimore. Born in Maryland the 15th Oct: 174G, suc- 
ceeded Archbishop Carroll in 1815, died 18th June 1818. 

Title — The Most Rev : Ambrose Marechal 3d Archbishop 
of Baltimore. Born in France on the 5th Dec. 17G8, con- 
secrated the 14th Dec. 1817, died the 29th Jany 1828. 

Title— The Most Rev. James Whitfield 4th Archbishop 
of Baltimore. Born in England the 3d of Xov. 1770. Con- 
secrated the 25th of May 1828, died the 19th Oct. 1834. 

Title — the Most Rev. Samuel Eccleston 5th Archbishop 
of Baltimore. Born in Maryland the 27th of June 1801, 
Consecrated the 14th of Sept. 1834. 

Published by John T. Green, Chambersburg, Pa. En- 
tered according to act of Congress in the year 1837 by John 
T. Green in the Clerk's office of the District Court of the 
Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Size 19.8 x 13 ins. 



Colonel Elite Boudinot in New York (%, February, 1778. 453 



COLONEL ELIAS BOUJHXOT IX NB\\ r . YOPJv CITY, 
FEBRUARY, 177S. 

CONTRIBUTED l*¥ IIKT.nX JORDAN. 

[The following interesting journal was kept by Colonel Elias Boudi- 
not, Commissary-General of Prisoners, while sojourning in the city of 
New York, in February of 1778, looking after the welfarcof the Amer- 
ican prisoners and arranging exchanges. The original manuscript is 
among the Boudinot Papers of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. — 
Ed. Pens a. Mag.] 

Tuesday 3 d Fiby. 177 S. — Arrived at sundown k 6ent a 
Sergeant to Gen. KoLinson, 1 who sent him back with a 
demand of my Commission and business. He sent a Ser- 
geant to conduct me to Mr. Loring's: 2 was ree'd very po- 
litely k waited on to Gen. Robinson's, who behaved with 
great kindness & invited me to Breakfast next morning. 
Sent for Lord D 3 [rummond]. Gen. It. and Mr. Loring 
assured me that they wished every indulgence to Prisoners, 
that could consistently be granted. AVas told I might 
Lodge where most convenient, — went to Mr. P [intard's ?] . 
Gen. [Charles] Lee came in k denied having wrote but once 
to Col. Seely about Mrs. 13 [atticr ?] X had received no answer. 

JFhby tth. — Breakfasted with Gen. Robinson, who ap- 
peared candid k polite. Mr. Loring met me here. See a 
Mr, "Webb, 4 who came from Connecticut as a ilag from 
Gov. Trumbull for the exchange of Prisoners, k brought 
some with him. I was much surprised at this measure & 

1 Perhaps it is unnecessary to call attention to the error in spelling the 
name of the British general in command of the city of New York, 
which occurs throughout the journal of Colonel Boudinot, but for 
"Robinson" read Robertson (Major-General James Pobcrtson). 

* Joshua Loring, the British Commissary of Prisoners. 

* Lord Drummoud, s<>:\ of the Karl of Perth, who was in America 
looking after his father's interests. After the peace Colonel Boudinot 
was the attorney of the fam;ly. 

♦Joseph Webb, brother of Colonel Samuel B. Webb, of the Con- 
necticut Continental Line. 



454 Colonel Elias BouHnat in New YorkCify, February, 1778. 

opposed it. Arranged to exchange on Parole, Col. Law- 
rence for Col. HoMen and Col. DoLuncey for Col. Swoop. 1 
Went to two Hospitals & Sugar House, found everything as 
decent as could be expected. Mr. Loring mentioned Camp- 
bell & Haring breaking their Paroles. 101 Prisoners in 
Sugar House; in two Hospitals 10'2 k 109. Prisoners re- 
ceive £d allowance — £1 from Mr. P[intard] twice a week. 
See Mr. [Andrew] Elliott, Mr. Chief Justice [Smith], Mr. 
Kemp. 2 Waited on Mr. Fell 3 at his lodgings & promised 
to hear his story when Mr. Loring could attend. 

Fehry 5. — Waited on Mr. Loring and went to Gen. Robin- 
son, from thence to the Provost. See Col. [Ethan] Allen, 
Major Payne, 4 Capt. Flahaven, 5 Mr. Tan Zant. 6 Col. 

1 Colonel Michael Swope, of the York County, Pennsylvania, Associa- 
lors, captured at Fort Washington November 1G, 177G, and not ex- 
changed until January 26, 1VS1. 

* John Tabcr Kempe, Attorney-General of New York. 

■ 'Judge John Fell, of New Jersey, "the great Tory hunter," who 
was captured near Tappan in April of 1777. Colonel Boudinot, in hi? 
" Observations relating to the prisoners confined in the Provost," states, 
"Judge Fell was refused a Doctor or Medicine when sick," and fur- 
thermore, "the officers make great complaints of the cruelty of the ser- 
geant in locking them up on the most trifling occasion in the Dungeon, 
•where sonic of them have been for several weeks ; one in particular with 
a wound in the leg, which he never could get dressed." 

4 "Major )3. Payne was accused of killing Capt. Campbell at the time 
of his capture, and with having no commission. . . . Major Payne sol- 
emnly denies the charge, and states that he did not hear of his death 
until after he had been taken prisoner, lie has acted under a commis- 
sion and his rank has always been acknowledged by the American army." 
~ -JiowiinoCs Ob.-'.-rvutions, etc. 

i Captain John Flahaven, of Colonel Ogden's New Jersey regiment, 
captured at Amboy April 20, 1777. "The charge against Capt. Fla- 
haven, that he broke the thigh of a soldier with the butt of a gun, after 
he wad shot, is positively denied by him, and D : Loring acknowledged 
the man's leg was broken by a ball. . . . Capt. Flahaven was surrounded 
and did not surrender, and was constantly fighting for fifteen minutes 
after the soldier was struck by the ball." — DmtdiMft (':-•::.'.-. 

• Wynant Van Zant, "a volunteer in active service, accused of rob- 
bing Mr. Wallace and firing on the Asia. . . . denies the whole charge 



Colonel Elias BowUnot in New York City, February 1778. 455 

Allen is confined for going to Xew York contrary to his 
Parole, which he acknowledges, but that it was done br- 
others & lie returned airaiii three weeks before he was con- 
fined; Major Payne for want of Commission & killing Mr. 
Campbell, which he positively denies; Capt. Flabaven for 
breaking a man's thigh after taking him ; this he denies and 
says there is- no proof against him ; Mr. Van Zant, a volun- 
teer, and confined for formerly taking Mr. Wallace's plate. 
They acknowledge they receive proper Provision but, com- 
plain of close confinement & harsh Treatment. Went to 
Commissioner's Stores & see the Provisions dealt out and 
got acc fc of rations — the Pork good, Biscuit rather musty. 
Went to Sugar House 1 & sec the Provisions divided, & 
called up Prisoners & examined them about complaint 
against the Sergeant, sent me in writing. They all denied 
it with great resentment k threatened vengeance on the 
author if he could be found. I am very suspicious that the 
greater part of these fellows are great Villians and rob each 
other. Ordered them a gill of rum a man. 

Mr. Loring informed me that Mr. "W [ebb] came to ex- 
change Prisoners & would take off all from Connecticut; 
that Col. Lawrence was to be exchanged for Col. Ilolden; 
Col. DeLanccv for Col. Ply* -and 13 soldiers brought in for 
bo many taken lately in the Sound. All this I objected to. 
Agreed to let Col. Lawrence go on Parole for Col. Ilolden, 
and also Col. DeLancey for Col. Magaw, 3 Sc directed 13 sol- 
diers longest in captivity to be discharged for those sent in. 

by insisting that he never did anything of the kind, but by express orders 
of his superior ollicer, for which be cannot be held accountable." — 
JjoudinoVs Observations, etc. 

1 The troops captured at Fort Montgomery were confined in the Sugar 
House prison, and not allowed to have victuals or drink for two days 
and two ni^hN, and sixty of them were forced to enlist in the Kritish 
service to save their lives. 

'Colonel Join Ely, of the Connecticut militia; he was not finally 
exchanged until December 5, 1780. 

5 Colonel Robert Magaw, of the Fifth Pennsylvania Battalion, cap- 
tured at Fort Washington, and finally exchanged October 25, 17S0. 



-' 



450 Colonel Ellas BoaJhxot in Nac York City, February, 177 S. 

Mr. Loring promises if Col. DcLnncey is let out for a Lieut. 
Col., lie will accept of a Lieut. Col. for a Col. Have de- 
sired that no Exchange may take place but according to 
order, unless special reason. Must send receipt for 13 
maimed Prisoners to get 13 of ours. Ordered soap to he 
6ent to Sugar House; paid Mr. Canfield 1 a little hag of 
money sent from Nash. Visited Mr. Fell at his lodging; he 
is sickly & begs for his Parole being enlarged. 

Fclry 6. — "Waited on Mr. Loring & went to the Provost, 
visited the rest of the Prisoners. It is acknowledged by 
Dr. Loring that the man's leg charged to be broke by Capt. 
Flahavcn with the butt of a Musket, was broke by a Ball. 
We found Capt, Van Dyke confined on suspicion of aiding 
& abetting the setting fire to the Town. 2 It is agreed that 
he was secreted in a House & found four days before it & 
confined in the Provost, but it is asserted that sometime 
before we evacuated the Town, he said he would burn it — 
this he denies. Capt. Bissel is confined for going 21 miles 
out of his Bounds to court a woman he afterwards married. 3 
Capt. Randall for not having a Commission with him & 
therefore treated as a Robber. 4 Capt. Smock & Whit- 

1 Thomas Canfield, a commissioner for selling Tory property, in Eases 
County, New Jersey. "His office has been mistaken. The property of 
people, who had taken part against us, was in many instances left with- 
out an owner. Proper persons in every county were then authorized to 
take possession of all said property, to sell what was perishable, and 
were thereafter to be responsible for the proceeds. Mr. Canfield is 
known to Mr. Boudinot to be a simple, honest man, of good character." 
— Boudinot' s Observations, etc. 

* "Capt. Van Dyke denies having ever said anything ou this head. 
That when the city was taken, his retreat was cut off; he sought refuge 
in a house, and was employed by the women of it ; and that he tent 
word to Col. Brewerton to come and take him. His confinement has 
been close and severe, and he is now entitled to his exchange according 
to the time of his capture." — B&udinofs Observation*, etc. 

1 "The charge is rather hard, as it is confirmed to the contrary — he 
courted Ids wife near the bounds of his parole. : ' — Boudinoft Ol<<rrva~ 
tions, etc. 

4 Captain Nathaniel Randall, captured at Woodbridge, was not then 
in the service or on command. 



Colonel Ellas Mouiinol ik Ate York City, February, 1778. 457 

lock 1 for taking arm.? after the Oath of Allegiance. Capt 
Traverse of Navy for a suspicion of having wrote a letter by 
a Deserter out of the Sugar House, who charged him with it, 
but now denies it. Lieut, Mercer, 2 not known for what; 
Lieut. .Skinner for taking Up Wallace k others. 3 Lieut. 
Sitcher sent thero for a night & forgot. * Lieut. Foster' no 
Commission. Capt Xathaniel Van Zant for stealing spoons 
— he says he can produce the man he bought them of. 
Capt. John Chatason of a Merchant ship. Dr. Minime for 
going from his parole L speaking against the Government. 
I. found the Prisoners here tolerably comfortable as to pro- 
visions, but they are sickly & complain of the stench of the 
air arising from the close rooms and numbers imprisoned; 
also that they have been formerly cruelly treated by the 
Sergeant, put into the Dungeon for the most trilling things, 
such as insisting on more water than usual in hot weather. 
That many of them have laid 10-12 & 14 weeks in the 
Dungeon without any aid or assistance, particularly Sichem 
who was wounded in the Thigh & left to cure himself in 
the Dungeon. I had the Sergeant before the Prisoners who 
accused him with the Treatment, which he acknowledged, 

1 "Capt. Smock and Whitlocfc acknowledge the fact, and declare faith- 
ful adherence to their oaths as long as they were protected, but when the 
British army left the Jerseys, they took the. benefit of Gen. Washington's 
proclamation." — JiowJinot's Observations, etc. These officers belonged 
to the First New Jersey Militia, and were captured at the Light House, 
February 13, 1777. 

2 Lieutenant John Mercer, of New Jersey, captured near Bound 
Brook, March 7, 1777. "lie is charged with speaking contrary to bis 
parole. This is denied, but as lie has suffered long, it is hardly worth 
while to examine particulars." — IlnudinoC a Observations, etc. 

5 "Lieut. Skinner knows of no accusations against him, and has long 
been confined without any being suggested." — Boudinot't Observations, tie. 

* Lieutenant William Sitcher, of Spencer's New Jersey Continental 
Line. 

* "Lieut. Foster had no commission with him, and is charged with 
oppressing the friends of the Government, lie claims that being an offi- 
cer of that rank, like charges might be brought against every lieutenant 
of Col. Spencer's regiment." — ttoudinot't Observation*, e.'\ 



458 Colonel FJ'cjs Boudimt in New York Cf.ty, February/, 1778. 

aiteclging Provocation. Mr. Loring offered to have him 
tried by a Court Martial if it was thought necessary. There 
was also in the Provost a number of Inhabitants, Committee 
Men & others, all of whom suffer exceedingly & beg for 
relief or they must perish. 

Called on Gen. Lee k Col. Butler; promised Major Grif- 
fith Williams ' to get him permission for going to Canada via 
the Lakes. Called on Mr. Sherbrook. ? Dined with Mr. 
Loring in company of Gen. Robinson, Capt. Murray 3 & 
Major "Weems 4 his Aids, Lord D[rummond] k Mr. Webb 
&c, treated with ^reat civility & candor. In evening see 
Com. Hotham, Lord Kodan [Rawdon] k others. 

Dr. Mallet 5 informs me that he lias received accounts 
from Albany that his Deputy there, is obliged to find every- 
thing for the Hospital or to pay the Cash for it immediately, 
which he complains of as a great hardship. 

"Went to see Lady Mary AYatt, 5 Mrs. Maturin 7 and others. 

Febry 7. — Waited on Gen. Robinson with Mr. Loring & 
related what we had done, expressing my satisfaction with all 
but the Provost. The General declared himself ready to do ^ 

every reasonable thing to soften the rigors of "War; that he 
never should make Prisoners of peaceable Inhabitants & 
therefore did not understand what exchange could be ad- 

1 Major Griflith Williams, of the Royal Artillery, captured with Lur- 
goyne's army at Stillwater. 

1 Miles Shcrbrooke, merchant. Colonel Samuel B. Webb, of the Con- 
necticut Line, was a guest at his house during his captivity. 

5 Captain Murray was the secretary of General Robertson. He was a 
son .of the Pretender's secretary in the rebellion of 1745. 

' N. York 20* Feb.* 7$. 

"Capt. Murray presents his Comp" to Mr Rintard & informs him that 
every paper relative to the Prisoners should be sent to Mr Loring who will 
present it to the General." MS. JJomtinot Paper*, II. S. P. 

4 Major James WemyB, of the Fortieth Regiment of Toot. 

8 Dr. Jonathan Mallet, chief surgeon and purveyor to the hos- 
pitals. 

• Wife of Robert Watts, and daughter of General Lord Stirling. 

1 Mary Living-ton Maturin, a sister of Colonel Livingston, of the 
Continental annv. 



Colonel Ellas Boudinot in New York C'd>j, February, 177S. 459 

mitted of Citizens. I represented thai many of the Pris- 
oners in the Provost were confined as they alledge on unjust 
Charges, many on Charges of facts done by order of proper 
authority & others as oflicers of Justice. He agreed that 
I should reduce the matter to writing & give it to him this 
evening. 1 I mentioned the propriety of my formal appli- 
cation to Gen. Clinton for Gen. Lee's Parole. He alledged 
no necessity, for the answer I would receive would be, that 
he had not received any Instructions on this head from Gen. 
Howe. Consented to Mr. "Webb's sending out a private 
asked by Mr. Loring, for one he takes out. I asked o? Gen. 
Robinson, Mr. Fell being admitted to the Libert v of the 
Town, he agreed, on the Doctor's certificate of the neces- 
sity. Promised Hi*. Mallet to let Br. Minime have what he 
wants on bis Acct. Dined with Gen. Lee & then waited on 
Gen. Robinson. I found him alone & had a long chat on 
American subjects. He alledges that no sensible man in 
England thinks it right to tax us ; all wish reconciliation, k 
that a man would make his Country happy to bring it about 
&c. Mr. Loring & Lord Drummond came in & supped with 
us. Gen. Robinson proposed the subject of Prisoners; 
thinks 1700 ought to be sent in, being admitted to their 
Paroles, at the request of our officers, and therefore at our 
risque. He thinks it right if we find all our & their Pris- 
oners with Provisions, they should find us with Clothing; 

1 Agreeably to the suggestion of General Robertson, Colonel Boudinot 
prepared a report of his investigations at the Provost, the rough draft of 
which is among the Boudinot Papers of the Historical Society of Penn- 
sylvania. The preamble of the report reads: "Mr. Boudinot having 
visited the Provost in the city of New York by permission of Gen. Rob- 
inson & finding the following American Prisoners confined there (some 
of them many months) on the several charges under-mentioned os they 
alledge, begs leave to suggest a few Observation* on each of them in 
hopes that some general line of conduct may be humanely agreed upon 
mutually to soften the unnecessary severities, of captivity." Then fol- 
low the names of the officers, with observations on the- charges against 
them, much of which has been used in annotating the text of the 
journal. 



460 Colonel Ellas Boudimt in Nod York City, February ,177 8. 

consents to pay all arrears of their officers, provided we paid 
the whole Board on Long Island. I gave him my Obser- 
vations on the Prisoners in the Provost — he promises to 
remedy every thing he conveniently can. 

M'bry 8. — Went with Mr. Loring to Long Island & visited 
our Prisoners. They received me with preat Jo v. Found 
them very comfortably situated. Col. Atlee l & Mogaw in- 
formed me of their request to Gen. Howe for the release of 
the sick Prisoners, but that it was first asked by Mr. Loring, 
but that they thought it the best thing that could possibly 
be done, and now wish that some generous compensation 
could he given to settle the matter. They complain heavily 
of partial Exchanges. Col. Ely was sent for last night after 
dark, unknown to Mr. Loring or myself. Promised Col. 
Antile [Antill] to forward his Chest. See Mr. D[avid] 
Clarkson, must remember [torn]. Was sorry to find many 
of the officers had been very extravagant in their Clothes, 
getting Laces &c., by which their Accounts are raised and 
I much perplexed. 

FeWy 9th. — Waited on Mr. Loring & with him on Commo- 
dore Ilotham, to whom I represented the state of Sea Pris- 
oners, k that Mr. Pintard was refused permission to clothe or 
send them additional Provisions. II c informed me that all the 
Prisoners were kept on board Prison Ships ; that they received 
the King's allowance Jd rations; that he could not know 
Mr. Pintard or any other person not of his appointment. 
That if anything was sent from us to his Commissary, they 
should be distributed, but not by Mr. Pintard. Put that he 
could not admit of the distribution of clothes purchased 
here, without Gen. Howe's orders. I proposed the case of 
Capt. Flynri, 2 & offered him in Exchange for Capt Traverse. 
lie said lie being only Captain of a Paquet, Lord Howe 
would not exchange him for more than a Merchantman, 

. ■ Colonel Samuel J. Atl'ee, of the Pennsylvania Musketry Battalion, 
captured nt the battle of Long Island, and exchanged August <>, 177S. 

'Captain Flytan was British "Superintendant of Oralis &c n for the 
city of New York. 



Colonel Ellas Boudlnot in New York City, February, 1778. 4C1 

and that as Capt. Judd was going- home with hhn as a Pas- 
senger for his Health, he could not he considered as a Mili- 
tary man. I then applied to him for the enlargement of 
Capt. Traverse k others in the Provost. lie insisted that 
no Sea Officers could he admitted to their Parole, as they 
had no place to keep them hut on hoard of Vessels. At 
last in Consideration of Capt. Traverse k the others being 
confined so long on Land, he consented to their Parole on 
Long Island. lie also consented to Mr. Pintard sending 
some Beef on hoard. 

Entered into several Exchanges with Mr. Loring, as per 
list. Get liberty from Mr. Loring for Capt. Boyle's going 
home with rne, and Capt. Bissel k Lieut. Sitcher to go on 
Parole on Long Island. I visited Mr. Fell k got a Certifi- 
cate of his want of health from which it became necessary 
to have the liberty of the City. 

Visited Chief Justice Smith, who expressed his pleasure 
at hearing that my conduct since I had been in Town, had 
been greatly approved. Gen. Lee came in the evening. 
Mr. Loring proposes to be charged with French officers k 
to write to Canada for their rank. 

Fabry 10th. — Spent the morning with Gen. Robinson on 
the subject of my Observations and on the whole he sub- 
mitted to my reasoning, except the case of Capt Van Dyke, 
who he said could not he liberated without Gen. Howe, there 
bcin£ full evidence of his bein«' concerned in burning the 
Town. Ethan Allen who having once behaved unworthy 
of his character could not again be trusted, and the People 
were violent; as to the rest, he believed might be enlarged, 
unless ZST. Van Zant who is accused of stealing. See Lord 
Drummond & conversed on subject of Gen. Washington, 

Ftbry 11 tit. — Waited on Mr. Loring and exchanged sev- 
eral Prisoners. Went to Gvn Robinson, who gave me an- 
swers to my Observations as per list. Obtained the discharge 
of Major Payne, Capt. Flahaven, Capt, Bissel & many others 
from the Pr'ovost; obtained John Fell enlargement &c. 
Promised to send to Boston for mate & midshipmen of Capt. 



462 Colonel Ellas Boudinol in New York City, February, 177S. 

[torn]. The Officers admitted to Parole are Major B. 
Payne, Capt Flahaven, Capt Bisse! (exchg'd), Capt. X. Fitz 
Randolph, 1 Lieut. Mercer, Lieut. Sifctier, Foster, A. Q. M., X. 
Kelly, 2 Ensign John Okely, Surgeon Van Zant, a volunteer 
(exchg'd), Mr Kennedy, a volunteer [no charge]. The 
answer to Col. Ethan Allen was, that having broke his 
Parole he was not entitled to, the General could not think 
of letting out a man so disagreeable to the People, without 
Gen. Howe's orders. To Capt Van Dyke, that being fully 
convinced that he had planned and encouraged the burning 
of the Town, altho' he was taken up previously to it, yet 
being found secreted in a house for that purpose, he could 
not admit of his enlargement, lest the remainder of the 
Town should be endangered. To Capt Van Zant, the Gen- 
eral will enquire into the charge. To Capt Smock & AVhit- 
lock, that having broke their faith three times, not to be 
trusted. To Lieut Skinner, that the people look upon him 
iso bad a man, that he is not to be trusted, the Towns people 
would murder him. Caniicld and other Committeemen, 
cannot discharge them without Gen. Howe. 3 

Made application for Lieut. Skinner & Dr Minime, Smock 

1 Captain X. Fitz Randolph, confined for want of a commission. "At 
the time of Capt. Randolph's capture commissions were not granted 
to militia officers, but only certificates of their election, lie has always 
been acknowledged of that rank since his captivity. " — Boudinot's Ob- 
tcrvatioas, etc. 

1 Assistant Quartermaster Kelly had no commission with him. 

* With regard to "Committee men," Colonel Boudinot winds up his 
report to General Robertson as follows : u These are obnoxious from 
their offices. It is rather hard that a man duly appointed to a Civil . 
office should be punished so severely, for the proper excuse of it is that 
every man must support some Government. A Committee man is dif- 
ferent from what it formerly Was, it being now in the nature of au over- 
seer. If public officers in the Civil department, on both sides of the 
question, are all to be made close prisoners, without redemption, it will 
rather anihilatc all Government whatever, -aud the jails everywhere 
must be filled with unhappy men. I cannot uuder>tand why a Civil 
officer should b: more obnoxious than a military officer, if both keep 
within the line of their duty." 



Colonel Ellas Boudmot in New York City, February, 177S. 4C3 

and "Whitlock. Gen. Robinson objects to Skinner, that he 
lias tried to get out and bribe the sentinel. That Dr. Mmiine 
has broke hia Parole bv coming to Xew York and rebel line: 
to make an Insurrection — Minime denies it all. Gen Lee 
mentions the [torn] mode of shoemaking. 

Fcbnj 12th. — Bad weather. 

Fabry lSth. — Went again about Skinner &c. Gen Robin- 
eon still objects and cannot consent to their enlargement, on 
which I left him know that Van Bosk irk and others were in 
the like situation, which lie said he could not help. I imme- 
diately went to Mr. Lormg and objected to the exchange 
of Van Boskirk, which had been proposed by Sir II. Clinton. 

Took Parole of officers from Boston on new agreement. 

Fcbry 14 f h. — Breakfasted with Mr. Loring, and he in- 
formed me of letters being received from Gen. Howe, 
Took Hugh Campbell's Parole and discharged him from one 
given to Council. Exchanged two officers. Went to Gen. 
Robinson who informed me of letters from Gen. Howe, 
show them and objected to impropriety of preventing their 
purchasing provisions. I stated the question and he assented 
to propriety of a mutual Barter, but said those tilings should 
be settled by the two Generals. He was afraid matters 
would be perplexed at one place while we settled them at 
another. I promised him that all would be well if a mutual 
interchange of these civiliucs were admitted. He allcdircd 
the rectitude of supplying our Prisoners with bare neces- 
saries to make them comfortable, but not to fit them for a 
campaign. I again pressed him on tbe subject of the Pris- 
oners in the Provost, but he did not think it right in him 
to agree to their discharge — assured me that at any time he 
would do every civil thing to oblige me and offered me any 
assistance to forward me borne. He mentioned tbe Board 
of the Officers agree and I assured him of my paving it 
with the deduction of our charge witb their officers. 

Went again to Mr. Loring and settled Exchange again 
and received copy. Left witli him a copy of officers appear- 
ing to be due on my Books and desired him to furnish 



4G4 Colonel Ellas Boudinoi in New York Ccly, February, 1778. 

the Canada prisoners out of them. Promised to send his 
Brother in as soon as possible. He waited with me on the 
Commissary of Sea Prisoners, Mr. [Titus] Levy, who con- 
sented to let Provisions go aboard, but informed me that 
the Commodore would not consent to an exchange of Capt 
Mauley for Capt. Furnum or Capt. Traverse for Capt. 
Fly'nn. The Commodore agreed to the enlargement of 
Capt, Traverse, Capt. Chetham, Lieut Kempt, and Master 
Buret. Gen. Robinson also agreed to it. The Commissary 
of Sea Prisoners promises to send me return of them, and 
also to exchange merchant captains and sailors as fast as 
we can send them in. I offered Capt, Zoodnet for Capt. 
Traverse, but was refused. 

Gen. Pobinson informed me that Gen. Howe had sent 
orders to send. Gen. Lee by first man of war to Philadel- 
phia, that he might take his Parole. I objected to this 
Sea passage, but he alledged the GeneraFs order — proposed 
writing to Gen. Howe by me. 

Sec Gen. Lee, Lord Drummond and others. Promised 
Lord D. to pay bill. In the evening sent to Mr. Loring for 
Capt, Traverse's discharge; received answer some difliculties 
prevented and believed it would not be done. Mr. French 
and Mr. Miller called. 

This morning met Mr. Troup at Gen. Pobinson before 
Mr. Loring who acknowledged what I had said, but ascer- 
tained his narrative did not amount to what I supposed — of 
dead in one Hospital 120 from November 2d. 

Fcbry 15th. — Waited on Mr. Loring and got returns. lie 
promises oflicers names by first opportunity. Got Lev. Mr. 
[Hubert?] Keith on parole. Went to Gen. Kobinson, who 
informed me he was writing to Gen. Clinton his opinion on 
Gen. Howe's letters. Tie was convinced Gen. llowo was 
wrong in his supposition uf Gen. Washington's order extend- 
ing East of Pennsylvania. He wrote his letter to Gen. Clin- 
ton while I was by and read each sentence as it was wrote. He 
supposes the whole a mistake and tint matters may be easily 
settled if rightly understood. Thinks if neeessarv clothing 



Colonel EUas JJoudinot in New York City, February, 1778. -1G5 

only is only purchased by us, it is but reasonable Barter 
especially if the Blankets are not taken away but left with 
American agent. He supposes it possible Gen. Howe may 
permit the scheme, but thinks it highly improbable if rightly 
understood. He proposed a matter relative to the Board, 
and I repeated what I had often mentioned before, that all 
the Board since they left the Prison Ships, I looked upon 
mj'self bound to pay, but before that time, it must be set- 
tled mutually. After the General had finished his letter, I 
proposed stating the facts in my own way, that no mistake 
might be occasioned and that Gen. "Washington might have 
a copy to know what I have done. I immediately went 
home and when finished sent it to the General. Waited on 
the Commodore and again solicited the enlargement of Capt. 
Traverse and several other Sea Oilicers from the Provost, 
which I at last accomplished and agreed to the exchange 
of a midshipman and 9 seamen from Monmouth, belonging 
to the Mermaid. Obtained permission to see Capt. Manley on 
board the Preston, man of war. Went on board k see him. 
He appears dejected and longs for an Exchange. He 13 kept 
close, except walking the Quarter Deck at times. See Gen. 
Lee who proposes writing to Gen. Howe and Washington. 

Promised Mr. Loving to send evidence of the man who killed 
J. Richard.?, being a soldier and on duly. J. Troup to be 
charged. See Lord Drummond who gave me state of facts 
which I am to copy. 

FebrylGth. — Waited again on Gen. Robinson who called 
me into his chamber and informed me that he had some 
business of importance with me. That Mr. Wallace and 
others had been to Sir H. Clinton, and objected to Mr. Yau 
Zaut's exchange, he having been guilty of stealing Mr. Wal- 
lace's plate, and that he had no other security for it, than 
keeping him a Prisoner. lie said he could wish to have 
this matter settled, if I would send in the Plate, then he 
could be sent out, and in the mean time he' should be on 
parole. In answer I informed him, that Mr. Wallace had 
been a prisoner, was admitted to his Parole in a generous 
vol. xxiv.— 30 



4G6 Colonel Ellas Bond: not in New York City, February, 1778. 



manner, and bad refused to keep it or being Bummoncd. 

That previous to this an order was given to send the Plate, 
but on the breach of his Parole, it was countermanded. 
That what Mr. Van Zant did was by orders from his com- 
manding officer, he being a Volunteer. That I considered 
him as regularly exchanged by a proper officer, and if private 
people were allowed to intervene or their clamours attended 
to, we would do the same, and then there would be no end 
to it. That I could not undertake that the Plate would he- 
returned unless Mr. ."Wallace returned to his Parole. That 
I know no crime in taking goods according to orders, and 
that I did not desire Mr. Van Zant should be admitted to 
his Parole, as I knew he would be immediately locked up 
again, as he would speak his mind to any man living. That 
I insisted on his exchange. Gen. Eobinson told me that 
lie thought the taking of the King's goods a much higher 

O O C CD • O 

crime (if any) than taking Mr. "Wallace's, lie told me he 
would send for Mr. Wallace. 

I again called on him, when he gave up the point, but 
told me as a friend he would be^ the favour of returning 
the Plate and absolving Mr, "Wallace from his Parole, he 
would in some way or other discharge Mr. Fell. I answered 
that I could only represent the matter and let him know the 
issue. He politely offered " me Sea stores and gave me a 
special Passport- at my desire. 

I waited on the Commodore and exchanged Capt, Tra- 
verse, two Prize Masters and 9 seamen for 2 midshipmen 
and 9 sailors of the Mermaid, to be sent in, and a promise 
in writing to send in Capt. Goodrich to Philadelphia. See 
Gen. Lee who presses an answer from Gen. Washington and 
Gen. Howe. Set oil* for home in company with the officers 
and privates exchanged and on Parole. Bv means of the 
ice, obliircd to remain at Boskirk's Point all night. 

Fiin/ 17th. — Set off up the lulls, and after beating some 
time, with the wind boisterous and ahead, and after loosing 
an anchor and cable with the ice, returned back to our last 
lodging. Gen. Campbell sent us a Passport to go on. 



letters of Ike. Rkkard JjjcIx and Mev. George Cnvfj. 4G7 

i 

LETTERS OF HEY, RICHARD LOCKE AED JiEY. 
GEORGE CRAIG, MISSIONARIES IX PENNSYLVANIA 
OF THE " SOCIETY FOE PROPAGATING THE GOSPEL 
IN FOREIGN PARTS," LONDON, 174G-1752. 

BY BENJAMIN F. OWEN. 

[The Rev. Richard Locke, who succeeded the Rev. William Lindsay 
as missionary of the " S. P. G." in Pennsylvania, resided most of the time 
at Lancaster. In a letter to the secretary of the society he describes 
some of his experiences prior to and after his arrival in the province. 
"I was sent/' he writes, "by my L d B? of London to Bar mu das under a 
notion of £100. a year — when I came there it was but £50. & perquisites & 
all about £G0. their currency w ch is about £40 stg. — they have neither 
Bread nor Water only Rain Water & we gave 5d p r p d for coarse Sea 
bisquits & every other thing in Proportion. I staid there 8 montlis and 
scarce got enough to pay my Passage. By advice of y e Governor, I took 
my passage to Charle's Town in South Carolina. — have a Letter of En- 
couragement from the Secretary there, a former acquaintance, with a Letter 
of Recommendation from y e Governor to the Governor of that Province, 
but the Captain a villain carryed me to Philadelphia — the French Wars 
breaking out, and my wife being a weak woman, would not be pursuaded 
to go home— she was born in London, her mother was a Clavering, first 
cousin to Robert 1/ B p of Peterbu rough, and had it not been for this 
most charitable assistance of the Society, we must have been expus'd to 
great ])i faculties, the Jesuits, New Lights, Quakers, Moravians, Cove- 
nanters, Dutch and Irish prevail for much here, that an English Clergy- 
man meets with very little Protection & much less Charity. I preached 
in the Court House in Lancaster even- other Sunday for 3 years A have 
not received £20. & have had neither surplis or Common Prayer Book, 
but what I carry in my pocket." 

In a postscript lie states, "I hope it will not be an unacceptable curi- 
osity to you to have an account of the Eclipse of the Moon, that was; 
here the 13th day of February last. I was very exact in the Observa- 
tion ; it began just in the same nufnner at 10 h. p.m. as it ended at 2 
the next morning, that as near as was possible tot Observation to be 
made; the Opposition or full moon was within a minute of 12 a clock, 
and by the Tables made fory tf meridian of London, I find the Opposition 
or full moon was'Feb 14, 2G''' a . . .4 by 34™ in Time = S l 30 ,ri for 
that reckoning is 5 hours = 75 4 that in u str.iit line Lancaster from 
Jyondon by this eclipse is 2 ■'»."> 2 mihs distant." 



4G8 letters of Iicv. Richard Locke and Jle\\ George Croig. 

The Rev. George Craig, the Accessor of 5fr. Fi&ekc, arrived fit Phila- 
delphia May 17, 1751, and before taking up his residence at Lancaster, 
visited the congregation at Trenton, l\c\v Jersey, which lie found in 
charge of a "Frenchman from Canada," and preached there June 2J.] 

May it fle&se the Society : 

I return my humble thanks for the favour you have done 
me in appointing me one of your Missionary's, whose Letters 
I received the 21 of July 1*746, and as you have been pleased 
to appoint me Itinerary Missionary of Pcnsilvaiiia and ye 
Jerseys I obey the Order of the Society in reading ye Letter, 
that was sent to me at Trent Town, tho it was 100 miles 
distant from the place where I lived. 1 read the Service of 
the Church of England and preached there the 23 of July, 
where there had been no Sen-ice for 2 years before, nor any 
Church "Wardens, for they have no Church there, in any 
part of that Mission, since Bristol is taken away, I was in- 
formed that a thirds of that Town were Dissenters, they 
have a Presbyterian Ter.cher bred in Xew England, as well 
as Teachers of all other Dissenters, who have all the Same 
Power to Marry by ye Governor's License that any regular 
Clergyman hath for they arc directed in General to any 
Protestant Teacher, tho they have opportunity's of Assists 
ance as they have Clergy very near them ; the expenses are 
so extravagant to a stranger and no offer of assistance, that 
I am not able at present to settle there, but as the Mission 
is in general for Pensilvania and the Jerseys, I hope I shall 
not be thought to disobey y e Order of the Society, by re- 
siding for some time at Lancaster who have not a Clergy- 
man within CO or 70 miles of them, before I hear the further 
pleasure of the Society. 

As for the Xotitia I'arochialis, I shall give the best 
account I can of the Place where I have resided, for more 
than two years, it was a new County in Pensilvania called 
Lancaster, the County Town goes by the same name, of 
about 15 years standing & 05 miles to y* West from Phila- 
delphia; the Inhabitants are mostly Dutch, reckoned about 
a thirds, k about 300 houses, which increase to near 20 



Letters of llec. Richard Locke and Bee. George Craig. 469 

every year, here are about 30 familys English & Iris}), mostly 
poor, their . Subscriptions will amount to .-€5. a year they 
have no Church here of any Denomination.. I have con- 
stantly read Prayers and preached once a fortnight in the 
Court house they have begun a Church, but by mismanage- 
ment y* leading men heing too much inclined to the new 
Lights, that they have run the Parish in Debt, for we have 
21 Justices in this Country who are either Presbyterians, 
New Lights or Moravians & but 2 or 3 who profess the Be- 
ligion of the Church of England the Dutch have two 
Churches here, a Lutheran and Calvinist besides private 
Conventicles of Menists and Moravians; here is a Popish 
Chappel commonly supplyed once a month by a Jesuite, & 
a great many Papists about the country. I have had nine 
Communicants at one time, and have baptised abundance 
brought from y e Country, several whole Families, 8 negros 
in one Family; but we have no Pegister. From the Oppo- 
sition, about 20 miles to the N. E. of this Town I have sup- 
plyed once a fortnight, a Congregation of mostly Welsh 
very regular, & I believe near 100, I have commonly 20 
Communicants 3 times a year, but we have neither Church 
Bible nor Common Prayer Book, and for the number of 
baptized we have no Register tho I have several times 
mentioned it, but I believe near 100, there arc 50 Acres of 
Land purchased for the repairing of y e Church w ch is built 
of square Logs, and I am informed 100 more hath been left 
for a Clergyman, their Subscriptions will amount to between 
£20. & 15. a year, there is another larger Congregation 
mostly of Irish about S miles to the South of the AVelsh 
church or Bangor, & about 20 miles E from Lancaster 
called Pickquay & I am told by some of y* heads of the 
Parish that there Subscriptions might arise to about jC20 a 
year, this place may very well be supplyed by the Parson 
who supplys the WeWh; but Mr. Backhouse supplys it at 
present tho forty miles distant from them, some times on 
•Week "Days. 

I had not been long in Lancaster, before there came a 



470 Letters of Rev. Richard Locke and Rev. George Craig. 

Pqr$on from Contwagcr, about 50 miles to the westward 
from Lancaster telling me how much they stood in want of 
a Clergyman, and that they were about 100 miles distant 
from any, tliey bad made a purchase of 180 Acres of Land 
for the maintainance of a Clergyman, after some time I con- 
sented to go with him, and at the first Sermon, they 
reekoned about 150, but there were general Dissenters, 
they count about 100 for some miles round that belong to 
the Church of England, we choose Church "Wardens k 
settled, a vestry, they immediately fell to work to raise a 
Log house Church k, the third time, I administered the 
Sacrament to 13, having baptized 3 Infants & Adults the 
first time and several since, they have neither Church Bible 
or Common Prayer Book k I believe very poor, for they 
could not raise 20s to bear my expenses for mony is very 
scarce in those Parts, 10 years ago there was not a white- 
man in all those parts, but all Indians, w ch are all gone back, 
& tis surprizing to them how the white People have since 
increased, that there is little or no Land now to be taken 
up at the first Purchase, there is a publick Popish Chappel 
supplied by the same Jesuite as supplys Lancaster with 
abundance of Papists, but as the whole Country is one con- 
tinued w T ood, tis impossible to find out the numbers of y m 
I went to a place from thence about 25 or 30 miles to the 
ivT.E. where are several Church of England People, but 
the Country is so overrun with Presbyterians, Xew Lights 
and Covenanters, that they are .very much fallen off 
from their Principles. I have preached twice there to 
about 30 or 40 People, and baptized a father and six chil- 
dren besides several others, from, thence I went to a place 
called Paxton about 9 miles further to the E. upon the 
Pivcr Susquehana, where I preached to about 40, but 1 was 
told there were about 30 familya ofy* Church of England, 
but for want of proper assistance they were much fallen 
away. I have been at two places besides just over y 9 great 
River Susquihana about 14 m